Monthly Archives: May 2020

Ward 8 Update: Andrea Jenkins, City Council Vice President

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Dear Neighbors,

I hope this newsletter finds you and your loved ones healthy and safe. The City of Minneapolis has currently recorded 2,339 positive cases of COVID-19 and has seen 108 related deaths. My condolences go out to all of those families, friends and loved ones.

On Thursday May 21st Mayor Frey issued the 12th Emergency Regulation since the onset of the pandemic requiring Minneapolitans and visitors to wear masks or facial coverings in indoor public spaces. These can be simple cloth masks as long as they cover your mouth and nose, the city is working to provide masks to low income communities, residents in high density residential settings and congregate living facilities. Additionally, we are kicking off the #MaskUpMPLS campaign to promote awareness and encourage donations of handmade masks to distribute throughout the community. More details regarding this are below in the newsletter.

My team along with community members and neighborhood organizations continue to work on planning events that build on the work that we’ve been doing throughout the term, including the 38th St. Thrive Small Area Plan, the Building Bridges, Breaking Bread event, which we will do again this year, but likely in a virtual format. We are also developing a summer safety plan to address some of the community safety concerns along the 38th street corridor.

As a member of the City leadership team and the Policy Group that has been formulated in response to COVID-19, I have been involved in the discussions to amend the 2020 Budget to address the significant loss of revenue which is estimated to be in the area of $165 million dollars. My commitment is to center equity in these conversations and to work to maintain the level of services and attention to our core city services to ensure that Minneapolis remains a city that we can all be proud of. That said every level of government will be faced with some very difficult decisions in the coming days and weeks. I for one commit to remain relentlessly optimistic about the future, I know that this community has and will continue to rise to these challenges with generosity and grace.

Lastly, I want to offer my Congratulations to all of the 2020 Graduates, be it Kindergarten, Middle School, High School or college. We are very proud of your accomplishments and though we can’t celebrate you in all the traditional ways with Pomp and Circumstance know that your hard work does not go unnoticed or unappreciated.

Stay well friends, look out for your elderly and vulnerable neighbors and support local restaurants and businesses when you can.

Happy Memorial Day!

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Join us for a community input session on the 38th St. Thrive! Cultural District & Strategic Development Plan, Thursday, June 4th from 4:30 pm to 6 pm

38th st thrive! event image

If you live or work along the E 38th Street Corridor, you may be familiar with or have heard about the 38th St. Thrive! project from your neighbors, friends, or colleagues that my office has been working on since the beginning of 2019. For over a year now the Ward 8 office, with support from the City’s Community Planning and Economic Development (CPED) department and with the incredible dedication of community leaders from our neighborhood organizations, cultural centers, community organizations, and businesses, have worked to co-create a comprehensive strategic planning document that centers the community’s vision for the future of the 38th Street Corridor and our shared community.

Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins and the 38th St. Thrive! planning committee would like to provide an additional opportunity for you to engage with this project in its entirety. At this virtual community event, you will be presented a detailed overview of the plan and asked to share your feedback. We hope that you can participate with us!

When: Thursday, June 4th from 4:30 pm to 6 pm

How to participate: Join this virtual event on Thursday, June 4th at 4:30 pm via Skype using the instruction below:

Join Skype Meeting

Trouble Joining? Try Skype Web App

Join by Phone: +1 612-276-6670, meeting passcode: 651983355# (Dial-in Number)

Facebook event link: https://www.facebook.com/events/286651322731432/

At the virtual community meeting you can expect to:

  • learn about the origin of the 38th St. Thrive! project and understand the community engagement process.
  • review a condensed presentation of the strategic development plan, you can read the full draft plan here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1qs3AQhkcCu7sMZXhIw71s7TRkxM8BnWQ.
  • provide input and feedback on the strategic development plan.

Background on the 38th St. Thrive Project

In 2015, the community held a series of meetings titled “The Future of East 38th Street,” hosted by then Ward 8 Council Member Elizabeth Glidden. Those meetings led to the generation of several ideas, priorities and recommendations from community members.

In February 2019, Ward 8 Council VP Andrea Jenkins reconvened community members to co-create a strategic development plan by the residents, business owners, and neighborhood organizations in the E 38th Street community, in collaboration with the City of Minneapolis’ Department of Community Planning and Economic Development.

In March 2019, a smaller planning committee was formed with community members who expressed interest in driving the planning process from the initial February event, to conduct community engagement and to draft a proposed plan together to share with the larger community.

This planning committee met five times to craft the district’s vision, assets, and strategies based on priorities identified by the broader 38th Street community and a draft plan has been developed to share with you all.


Mayor Frey issues policy requiring face coverings for indoor public locations

mask up image

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey signed Emergency Regulation 2020-12 requiring people in Minneapolis to wear cloth face masks or coverings when they are in an indoor place of public accommodation including grocery stores, recreation centers, hotels, retail businesses, the skyway system and government buildings. The emergency regulation will take effect Tuesday, May 26.

In the lead up to the May 26 effective date, Frey is encouraging Minneapolis businesses and residents to help boost public awareness by participating in the City’s social media campaign #MaskUpMPLS.

Medical research has indicated that COVID-19 may have a high rate of transmission through respiratory droplets, particularly while indoors, and that wearing a mask can help reduce the risk of community spread. Research has also shown that people who are asymptomatic or yet to show signs of the virus can still transmit it without knowing they have contracted it.

Businesses will not be required to provide masks to customers or employees themselves, though employers shall be required to mandate the use of masks by their staff. The city will be launching a Memorial Day mask drive in the coming days to help get masks to those who need them before the regulation takes effect.

Non-compliance should be reported through 311.

Find more information here.


Free COVID-19 Testing this weekend information available in both English and Spanish

free testing logo

You can download and share this graphic in both in English and Spanish.

Any Minnesotan who wants to be tested for COVID-19 is encouraged to get tested this weekend. There is no charge for the testing and you will not be asked for insurance cards or ID. Everyone will be required to social distance and wear a mask at the testing locations.

When: Saturday, May 23 – Monday, May 25

Time: 10 A.M. – 5 P.M. daily or until supplies are exhausted

NO Appointment Needed

Testing Locations:

  • East St Paul – 1530 Maryland Ave E, St Paul, MN 55106
  • Minneapolis Armory –  1025 Broadway St. NE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55413.
  • Moorhead Armory – 1002 15th Ave N, Moorhead, MN 56560
  • Duluth Armory – 4015 Airpark Blvd, Duluth, MN 55811
  • Faribault Armory – 3000 W Airport Rd, Faribault, MN 55021
  • St. James Armory- 521 Armstrong Blvd N, St James, MN 56081

The sites are hosted by the Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota National Guard, the State Emergency Operations Center, and the Community Resiliency and Recovery Work Group.

Pruebas gratuitas para COVID-19 este fin de semana

Cualquier persona en Minnesota que quiera hacerse una prueba para COVID-19 puede conseguirla este fin de semana. No se cobra por la prueba y no se le pedirá información acerca de seguro médico o documento de identidad. Se le requerirá a toda persona mantener el distanciamiento social y usar tapabocas en el lugar de las pruebas.

Cuando: Sábado, 23 de mayo – lunes, 25 de mayo

Horario: 10 A.M. – 5 P.M., todos los días o hasta agotar los materiales.

NO se requiere una cita previa

Lugares de prueba:

  • East St Paul – 1530 Maryland Ave E, St Paul, MN 55106
  • Minneapolis Armory –  1025 Broadway St. NE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55413.
  • Moorhead Armory – 1002 15th Ave N, Moorhead, MN 56560
  • Duluth Armory – 4015 Airpark Blvd, Duluth, MN 55811
  • Faribault Armory – 3000 W Airport Rd, Faribault, MN 55021
  • St. James Armory – 521 Armstrong Blvd N, St James, MN 56081

Los lugares para la prueba funcionan bajo el auspicio de los siguientes organismos: Departamento de Salud de Minnesota, Guardia Nacional de Minnesota, Centro de Operaciones Estatales para Emergencias, y el Grupo de Trabajo Resiliencia y Recuperación de la Comunidad.


Donate homemade face masks on Memorial Day

cloth masks

Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Memorial Day, Monday, May 25.

Remember to stay 6 feet away from others when dropping off your donation. Note: fire stations are not equipped to take any other donations at this time.

The City plans to distribute the donated masks throughout Minneapolis to residents, organizations and businesses that are most in need including food shelves, congregate living facilities, small corner stores and shelters.

Find face mask design patterns and instructions online.

  • Build a mask that tightly encloses the area around the nose and mouth from the bridge of the nose down to the chin, and extending onto the cheek beyond the corners of the mouth, so no gaps occur when talking or moving. Use an accordion fold to mimic a hospital mask as much as possible.
  • Use mask material that is tightly woven but breathable. Double layer the fabric if possible. Masks must be made from washable material such as fabric. Choose a fabric that can handle high temperatures and bleach without shrinking or otherwise deforming.
  • The mask should tolerate moisture from breathing.
  • Suggested materials:
    • Outer layer: tea cloth.
    • Inner layer: microfleece to wick away moisture.
    • Use a fat woven shoelace-type material to bind the sides (such as quilt binding).
    • For straps, use elastic straps that loop behind the ears.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends wearing cloth face coverings to help protect others from COVID-19. Cloth face masks can help prevent the wearer from infecting others – especially in situations where they can spread the virus without having any symptoms.


Sign up online to vote early by mail this election year

Request an Absentee Ballot Now

With health officials advising everyone to reduce contact to keep each other safe during the pandemic, the City of Minneapolis is recommending voting early by mail this election year. Voters can sign up now to get ballots for the August primary and November general election mailed to them. Ballots will arrive approximately six weeks before those elections, along with postage-paid envelopes for return.

All Minnesota voters are eligible to vote early by mail. Ballot applications should be made no later than 10 days before an election so the ballots can arrive in the mail with enough time for voters to return them.

Although voting early by mail is recommended, voters will still be able to cast their ballots in person at the City’s Early Vote Center, 980 E. Hennepin Ave., or at their polling places on the day of the election.

Making voting safe during the pandemic

The City of Minneapolis is working closely with the Minnesota Department of Health and Hennepin County to be prepared and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging voting early by mail, and Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services supports this and other CDC and Minnesota Department of Health recommendations to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballots this election year.

Video

Watch this video about voting by mail.

Sign up to vote by mail at vote.minneapolismn.gov.


35W@94 Downtown to Crosstown Construction Updates

mndot logo

Rescheduled: Midtown Greenway closure May 22 and May 26

Because of the weather, the Midtown Greenway closure has been rescheduled. The Midtown Greenway will be closed from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow, May 22 and on Tue, May 26. The detour routes include:

  • Westbound bicyclists: Northbound 5th Ave. to westbound 26th St. to southbound Blaisdell Ave. to eastbound 29th St.
  • Eastbound bicyclists: Northbound Nicollet Ave. to eastbound 28th St. to southbound 5th Ave.
  • Pedestrians: Nicollet Ave., 28th St. and 5th Ave.

Rescheduled: Lake Street closure May 26

The bridge deck pour of the new northbound I-35W bridge over Lake St. has been rescheduled. On Tue, May 26, Lake St. will be closed from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. between Stevens Ave. and 2nd Ave. Motorists will be detoured to 31st St. During this time, 2nd Ave. will also be closed between 31st St. and Lake St.

Reminder: Lake Street closed May 26 through early July

Because of the City of Minneapolis’ purchase of the Kmart property, some additional utility work is needed on Lake St. Beginning Tue, May 26, Lake St. will be closed between Blaisdell Ave. and 1st Ave. through early July. The detour routes include:

  • Eastbound detour: Southbound Blaisdell Ave. to eastbound 31st St. to northbound Park Ave.
  • Westbound detour: Southbound Portland Ave. to westbound 31st St. to northbound Lyndale Ave.
  • Pedestrian detour: Blaisdell Ave., 31st St. and 1st Ave.

Lake St. will remain open to 1st Ave. for westbound traffic, and all business access will be maintained.

All closures are weather permitting and subject to change.

Please drive with care in the work zone:

  • Slow down when approaching every work zone, then navigate through with care and caution
  • Stay alert; work zones constantly change
  • Watch for workers and slow moving equipment
  • Obey posted speed limits. Fine for a violation in a work zone is $300.
  • Minimize distractions behind the wheel
  • Be patient; expect delays, especially during peak travel times

Stay connected

For real-time travel information anywhere in Minnesota visit 511mn.org or dial 5-1-1.


Learn about the City’s new renter protection rules

city of minneapolis banner

The City of Minneapolis passed new renter protection rules that go into effect soon. Starting June 1, there will be caps on security deposits and limits on what a rental property owner can use to deny rental applications.

  • Inclusive screening criteria will set limits on what information in a renter’s criminal, rental and credit history can be used to deny a rental application. Landlords who don’t use the inclusive screening criteria will have to specifically state why an application is denied and provide an opportunity for the applicant to add more context to their history.
  • Security deposits will be capped at one month’s rent, or one-half month’s rent if the landlord requires first and last month’s rent to be paid in advance. If they require the first and last month’s rent to be paid along with the security deposit, renters must have the option to pay the security deposit in installments over three months.

The ordinance goes into effect June 1 for owners with more than 15 rental units. The effective date for property owners with 15 rental units or fewer is Dec. 1. Enforcement will be through the City’s housing maintenance code.

This follows previous renter protection efforts adopted recently, including relocation assistance for displaced renters and a requirement that owners of naturally occurring affordable housing rental property give the City 60 days’ notice before selling their units.

To learn more, visit minneapolismn.gov/renterprotections.


Census results affect federal funding for mental health care

we count census

Data from the census is used to not only determine political representation and redistricting for states, but it is also used by local governments to determine federal funding for many services and programs, including mental health care.

Mental health issues are common and affect tens of millions of Americans, but only half of individuals with mental illnesses receive adequate treatment. Without accurate census data, the funding that communities receive for necessary mental health programs may not represent the population that relies on such services. Completing the census allows communities to receive the funding that truly reflects their needs.

Don’t hesitate, complete the census now: my2020census.gov.


Neighborhood organizations respond to COVID-19

image of neighborhood organizations

The City’s Neighborhood and Community Relations (NCR) Department has collaborated with several neighborhood organizations to launch the Neighborhoods Respond to COVID-19 Fund (NRC-19) to provide a meaningful and efficient way for neighborhood groups to assist with the City’s COVID-19 response.

The fund has paid for 2,500 face masks and 4,800 bottles of hand sanitizer (more than 3 million doses of hand sanitizer) for the city’s most vulnerable residents.

Connecting resources with need

The City’s Health Department has established an online portal to connect resources with community organizations and individuals in need of resources (not personal protective equipment) during the pandemic. Requests that cannot be covered with City funding but can be covered by Neighborhood Revitalization Program dollars will be considered for the fund.

The neighborhoods contributing to the fund so far include West Calhoun Neighborhood Association with $25,000; Jordan Area Community Council with $3,500; ECCO with $3,000; and the Cleveland neighborhood with $1,000.

Photo: Members of the West Calhoun Neighborhood Association join NCR director David Rubedor (right) in preparing facemasks and hand sanitizer for residents.


MnDOT to host two virtual events on the Public History of 35W

public history of 35w event banner

Take part in MnDOT’s upcoming virtual events with the Hennepin History Museum and the Heritage Studies and Public History Program at the University of Minnesota. These events will give you the opportunity to connect with public historians, the project team, and learn more about the history of I-35W. Join through a device or call-in by phone to participate in the events.

Wednesday, May 27, 2020 Virtual Art Workshop

This virtual program will invite participants to develop a creative response to a presentation on the history of 35W in South Minneapolis. No prior artistic experience is required and all skill levels are welcome. This artistic response is simply meant to be fun and encourage a creative way of looking at the freeway and its history.

A piece of paper and a writing utensil are suggested for this event. Markers, crayons, and your other favorite art tools are also beneficial. All are welcome at this workshop and students (middle-school or older) are encouraged to participate!

Link to Virtual Event: https://bit.ly/35WVirtualArtWorkshop
Call-in Option: +1-408-418-9388,,*01*963703595##*01*
Access Code: 963 703 595

Thursday, May 28, 2020 Virtual Story Share

This interactive virtual event will share preliminary histories about opposition to the freeway, its impacts on communities of color, and concerns over equity and environmental justice. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and express interest in sharing their own perspectives and stories.

Link to Virtual Event: https://bit.ly/35WVirtualStoryShare
Call-in: +1-408-418-9388,,*01*965154459##*01*
Access Code: 965 154 459

These events are part of an ongoing partnership with Hennepin History Museum, the Heritage Studies and Public History Program at the University of Minnesota, and Minnesota Department of Transportation.


How to help animals while the Minneapolis Animal Care & Control shelter is closed

stray animals graphic

Minneapolis Animal Care & Control needs your help so it can prioritize its work for animals requiring immediate attention. The shelter is currently closed to the public during our COVID-19 response, but staff are still caring for animals.

Follow guidelines if you find stray or lost animals

Please review our guidelines on what to do if you find a stray animal before calling 311. Often the best thing to do for kittens or cats in your neighborhood is to leave them alone. And most lost dogs are found very close to their home, so walking around your neighborhood or posting on neighborhood social media sites frequently results in faster reunions.

Make a preparedness plan for your pet

It’s important to have a plan for your pets if you’re unable to care for them. Minneapolis Animal Care & Control has helpful tips on how to include your pets in preparedness planning for pandemics, severe weather and other emergencies.

Adopt a pet from a rescue partner

Rescue partners play an important role in placing healthy and treatable animals. Each year, Minneapolis Animal Care & Control places hundreds of animals with rescue partners. While there aren’t adoptable animals in our shelter right now, check out our rescue partners if you’re ready to adopt.

Contact Animal Care & Control

Animal Care & Control is closed to the public until further notice because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our officers will continue to respond to emergency calls when the lives or safety of people or animals are in imminent danger. Please call 311 or 612-673-6222 with questions or 911 in an emergency.


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

Jeremy Schroeder: Ward 11 Bulletin

Jeremy schroeder

jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov

(612) 673-2211

Greetings, Ward 11!

I hope this finds you and your family healthy and safe. This Ward 11 Bulletin includes a number of updates on the City’s ongoing COVID-19 response as well as other news and resources that may be helpful to you during this time. While this global crisis and its growing impacts continue to be a primary focus, we also continue our work on other important programs and initiatives. As always, I hope this newsletter is a useful digest of what’s happening on all fronts at City Hall and in our Ward 11 community.

Please continue to check the City’s COVID-19 website regularly for information on essential services, resources to help during the pandemic, and updates on emergency regulations. If you have questions or concerns, reach me at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov or 612-673-2211. I also continue to provide real-time updates between newsletters — on our pandemic response and other things — on my official Twitter feed and my Facebook page.


Staying Home Still Safest Option as State Eases Rules

Governor Tim Walz last week announced his Stay At Home order, which officially expired Monday, would be replaced with an order continuing to encourage Minnesotans to stay close to home but allowing some additional flexibility in limited circumstances. Retail stores and other local businesses are now allowed to open if they have a social distancing plan and operate at 50% capacity. Additional guidance is available from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, including a template plan and checklist for businesses. I ask that all businesses follow these rules to the letter if they choose to open, and totally respect if businesses wish to continue more limited service until they feel safer.

While the governor’s new order also permits gatherings of 10 people or fewer, I can’t stress enough that anyone coming together must continue to stay at least six feet apart. Please continue to wear masks, wash your hands often, and keep up all the safety measures you’ve been practicing for the last several weeks. We will all be safer and our community healthier if we continue to stay home whenever possible, cover our faces in public, and limit travel to only what is essential. We are not through the worst of what COVID-19 will bring yet. The number of cases and deaths continues to grow by the day, in Minneapolis, in Hennepin County, and statewide. This is still a very serious situation, and I am grateful for the way our community continues to come together to follow the rules and keep each other safe. Remember, you could spread COVID-19 to others even if you have no symptoms. The CDC website offers simple instructions for making homemade cloth masks with or without sewing.

In addition, Governor Walz last week signed executive orders strongly encouraging Minnesotans at greatest risk of serious illness to continue staying home, ensuring workers can raise concerns regarding the safety of their work environments without fear of discrimination or retaliation, and protecting workers from loss of income if they refuse to work under unsafe or unhealthy conditions. Following the guidance of public health officials, the governor will track indicators that could trigger a decision to re-impose restrictions to slow the spread of the virus if or when necessary. These indicators include the number of new COVID-19 cases, the percent of COVID-19 test that are positive, and the percent of COVID-19 cases for which the source of infection is unknown.

Track state data on the COVID-19 pandemic using this dashboard powered by the Minnesota Department of Health. The City continues to track the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Minneapolis using this online dashboard that shows the total number of confirmed cases in our city, how many people needed hospitalization, how many have recovered, and how many people have died.


City Amending Budget Due to COVID-19

Financial stresses caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, including a projected revenue shortfall between $100 million and $200 million, are forcing the City of Minneapolis to reassess its budget. As with other governments across the nation and globally, this sudden crisis is quickly transforming our City’s fiscal future – a dramatic enough change that we will revise our 2020 budget midway through the year. Mayor Frey will present his recommended revised 2020 budget to the City Council on June 12. The City Council will hold a series of meetings in mid- and late June to hear from City staff about the impacts of the recommended revisions and make any necessary modifications. There will be two opportunities for the public to engage and share their voices in this unorthodox process. Further details are still being finalized but I will absolutely share them as I learn more.

Our budget process typically plays out over several months, and it will be a significant challenge for my colleagues and I to get this work done quickly. Because of the unusual nature of this midyear revision, it is especially important for the City to be transparent in our approach and ongoing work to ensure we are being as responsible as possible with our tax dollars. Each day that passes without making changes, we risk spending money we don’t have. At the same time, it is crucial that my colleagues and I are as thoughtful and comprehensive as possible in determining what changes are necessary. We all benefit from the dedicated public servants across the City enterprise, who work every day to deliver essential services, keep us safe and healthy, and ensure residents and businesses can thrive in Minneapolis. Any adjustments that affect them must be made with care, compassion, and good reason.

The City Council has already frozen wages for all non-bargaining unit employees and work is ongoing with labor partners to implement a wage freeze across the enterprise to help guard against deeper cuts later. Bills under consideration by the state legislature could help ensure Minneapolis gets a share of the federal coronavirus relief bill. As of now, the City has received none. This has serious implications across our budget. I look forward to sharing more information as I get it, and I hope you’ll share your input as we to build an amended budget that balances our shared priorities and goals with real and growing fiscal constraints during this global crisis.


Sick and Safe Time Required for Minneapolis Workers

As more businesses open under Governor Walz’s revised plan, more Minneapolis workers will head back to their jobs. Under the City’s sick and safe time ordinance, employers are required to provide access to sick leave (or more generous leave) to all employees in Minneapolis. Leave must be paid by employers that have more than five employees, and accrual and use balances must be listed on pay stubs. Workers’ accrued sick and safe time hours are legally protected for their use due to COVID-19 symptoms, testing, or infection. These protections also can be used if the employee needs to care for a family member. Learn more here about sick and safe time protections, including how they’re impacted by COVID-19.


Have You Applied for Your Mail-in Ballot?

With health officials advising us all to do what we can to reduce contact with others during this public health crisis, I strongly encourage you to vote early by mail this election year. All Minnesota voters can sign up now to get ballots by mail for the August primary and November general election. Ballots will arrive about six weeks before each election, along with postage-paid envelopes to return them. Every Minnesota voter is eligible to vote early by mail – you do not need to give a reason.

Apply for your ballot at least 10 days before an election so you have enough time to receive and return it – it’s quick and easy, and it’s a great idea to take care of it now to be on the safe side. Although voting by mail is strongly recommended, voters will still be able to cast their ballots in person at the City’s Early Vote Center or at their polling places on Election Day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging voting early by mail, and the City’s Elections & Voter Services division supports this recommendation to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballot this election year. Get more information here.


Metro Transit Now Requiring Riders to Wear Face Coverings

Metro Transit is now requiring face coverings for those riding buses or trains, in line with CDC guidance. Masks, tightly woven cotton, bandanas, and scarves are all acceptable. (See how to make and use cloth face coverings here.) Children under the age of 2, those who have trouble breathing, and those who are unable to remove the face covering without assistance are exempt from this guidance. Service cannot be denied and customers will not be removed if they are not wearing a face covering, but let’s all continue to do what we can to keep ourselves and each other safe – it’s all the more important as state restrictions on businesses and gatherings loosen.


Routine Neighborhood Inspections Happening Now

As we continue to stay at home this spring to help keep each other safe, now more than ever it’s critical to keep clean yards and green space for each other’s wellbeing. City inspectors will respond to 311 complaints and in limited instances go through areas with vacant properties and a history of nuisance violations. Because of the added difficulties we’re all facing during this pandemic, anyone who receives a violation letter and faces hardships in complying can call 311 or the number at the bottom of the letter to discuss their situation. The City is committed to balancing the needs of the community, residents, and property owners with being fair, reasonable, and flexible.

Planning a spring cleanup, setting a route lawn maintenance schedule, and regularly checking in on any rental properties you own helps keep the City clean and safe. As temperatures warm up this week, it’s a great time to remove trash and debris, trim back vegetation that overhangs the sidewalk or street, mow your lawn, remove inoperable vehicles, and bundle brush and branches. Yard waste pick-up continues as part of your regular collection service if you’re a City Solid Waste & Recycling customer. If you are an older adult, veteran, or disabled person and need help with maintenance, there are resources available to help.

Landlords who have arranged for their renters to do yard work should make sure renters have necessary equipment and have a shared understanding of upkeep expectations. City inspectors recommend that landlords stop by occasionally to see if additional supplies are needed. Regardless of who does the yard work, responsibility ultimately lies with the property owner.

To report a property in violation or ask questions, call 311. It might also be helpful to review this more detailed information on nuisance violations.


How to Help Animals While City Shelter is Closed

Minneapolis Animal Care & Control (MACC) needs your help so it can prioritize its work for animals requiring immediate attention. The shelter is currently closed to the public during our COVID-19 response, but staff are still caring for animals. If you find a stray animal, please review our guidelines on what to do before calling 311. Often the best thing to do for kittens or cats in your neighborhood is to leave them alone. Most lost dogs are found very close to their home, so walking around your neighborhood or posting on neighborhood social media sites frequently results in faster reunions. In addition, it’s important to have a plan for your own pets if you’re unable to care for them. Check out these helpful tips on how to include your pets in preparedness planning for pandemics, severe weather, and other emergencies.

If you’re looking to adopt a pet, know that rescue partners play an important role in getting healthy animals into new homes. Each year, MACC places hundreds of animals with rescue organizations. While there aren’t adoptable animals in the MACC shelter right now, these rescue partners can help if you’re ready to adopt.

Please note that MACC is closed to the public until further notice because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Still, MACC officers will continue to respond to emergency calls when the lives or safety of people or animals are in imminent danger. Please call 311 or 612-673-6222 with questions, or 911 if it’s an emergency.


Gypsy Moth Treatments to Start Early Wednesday

I gave you a heads up in my last couple newsletters, and now the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) has set a date for its gypsy moth treatment in parts of Keewaydin and Wenonah neighborhoods. The first of two aerial treatments is slated to begin as early as 5:30 a.m. this Wednesday, May 20, depending on weather conditions. The second application will take place five to 10 days after that. Residents in and around the treatment area, up to a half mile outside of the treatment area, may be awakened by the noise of a low-flying airplane on days treatments are applied. The affected area is southeast of Lake Nokomis, roughly bordered by 53rd Street, Highway 62, 23rd Avenue, and 35th Avenue. Search the MDA’s interactive map to see if your home is within the treatment area.

Gypsy moths are among America’s most destructive tree pests, having caused millions of dollars in damage to Eastern forests. The moths are now threatening the tree canopy in our community. To get rid of the moths, officials will conduct two aerial applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) over the area, spaced five to 10 days apart. Btk is a biological product that is organically certified for use on food crops. It has no known health effects for humans, pets, birds, fish, livestock, bees, and other non-caterpillar insects.

To help area residents stay informed, the MDA has set up an Arrest the Pest Info Line at 1-888-545-MOTH with the latest details about treatment dates and times. On the morning of the treatments, residents can call the phone number with any questions they may have. Simply press 0 (zero) to speak to someone. The MDA’s website also has information about gypsy moths and control efforts, and residents can sign up for email or text updates about treatment progress.

Contact the Minnesota Department of Agriculture at 1-888-545-6684 or Arrest.the.Pest@state.mn.us with questions regarding gypsy moth and the planned treatments.


Transportation Action Plan Comment Deadline This Friday

The comment period for the City’s draft Transportation Action Plan closes this Friday, May 22, so be sure to take a look before then and offer your input. This document is an important one – it sets the City’s vision for planning, design, and implementation of transportation projects, for all people in all the ways they move around. It advances the transportation objectives outlined in the Minneapolis 2040 comprehensive plan, a framework that emphasizes equity and climate action. The plan includes strategies and actions related to walking, bicycling, transit, technology, freight, street operations, and design. Goals include:

  • Having three out of every five trips taken by walking, rolling, bicycling, or transit to help achieve our climate goals
  • Improving the experience of people walking and rolling on our streets, including through safer street crossings
  • Expanding transit coverage so 75% of residents are within a five-minute walk of high-frequency transit and 90% are within a 10-minute walk
  • Using street design to provide a comfortable and healthy environment for people, including more green space in street projects
  • Implementing a network of mobility hubs where folks can connect to multiple shared low- or no-carbon transportation options, such as bikes, scooters, cars, and transit

These are ambitious goals that will require the City and its partners to support expanded transportation access and options for Minneapolis residents. Your feedback will help inform a final draft of the plan, expected to be presented to the City Council later this year. Review the draft plan and submit your comments through the Transportation Action Plan website.


New Text Service Helps Survivors Stay Safe at Home

Spending more time at home helps protect the health of ourselves and our community, but for some, it can present other dangers. Individuals experiencing intimate partner violence and those who fear for their safety at home can now contact Standpoint – which provides services to domestic and sexual violence survivors – by text at 612-743-7397. The text-only service is available Monday through Friday during business hours to reach a domestic or sexual violence/abuse advocate. Standpoint advocates are also available to speak by phone at 800-313-2666 or via email at info@standpointmn.org.

Outside normal business hours, folks should call Minnesota’s 24/7 crisis hotline at 866-223-1111. Always call 911 in case of emergency.


Funding for Community-Based COVID-19 Response Efforts

The Community Health Partnership of Hennepin County (CHIP) will award mini grants worth between $200 and $500 to community members or small teams working to address COVID-19 locally, including by promoting mental health and supporting housing stability in our community. Because of the pandemic, applicants must use virtual or other creative engagement strategies that comply with public health guidance in order to keep themselves and others safe. The application deadline is this Wednesday, May 20 at 4 p.m. Get more information and see how to apply here.


Support Public Health By Taking the Census

One way we can show our collective appreciation for the healthcare workers on the frontlines of this crisis is simple, easy, and quick – take the census. The census, a comprehensive population count that takes place every 10 years, determines the resources our community gets for a wide range of essential programs and services including healthcare. When everyone in Minneapolis is counted, our City is in the best possible position to support and provide these critical resources. It only takes a few minutes to complete the census online, or you can do so over the phone by calling 844-330-2020 (for English) or 844-468-2020 (para Español). Learn more about the Census and why it’s so important here.

I also want to recognize the many, many neighbors who have already done their part to be counted. Minnesota is a national leader in census response rates, and Minneapolis is also doing well – led by Ward 11 neighborhoods, I’m proud to say. You can see a map of our census response rates here. Help us get as close to 100% as possible by completing your census questionnaire and reminding your friends and family to do the same!


Don’t Miss Out on Your Free Home Efficiency Kit

Xcel Energy is offering free home energy savings kits that include supplies that will help you save energy and money – and it’s a great time for that, considering the extra time we’re spending at home these days. Xcel residential customers, including renters and homeowners, can choose one of three kit types that include various combinations of easy-to-install power strips, LED lights, showerheads, and aerators. An LED light can save you more than $55 over its lifetime, while an efficient showerhead can reduce water consumption by up to 10%. The offer runs through May 26, so claim yours here today.


June and July Open Streets Events Cancelled

Due to COVID-19, the first two scheduled Open Streets events of the summer will not go on as planned. Open Streets Lyndale and Open Streets Minnehaha were originally slated for June but considering the significant public health risk posed by large gatherings in the near term, both events are off – though organizers are exploring the possibility of holding them in October. Event organizers continue to work with the City to evaluate the safety of hosting other planned Open Streets events later in the summer. They will make these determinations at least eight weeks ahead of the scheduled event dates. You can find more information and stay in the loop by visiting the Open Streets Minneapolis website.


Stay Engaged While We Stay At Home

I’m excited to pick up where we left off with a few new Community Conversations – though, for the foreseeable future, we’ll have to meet virtually. All Ward 11 residents are welcome to join in and share questions, concerns, and ideas at the following times:

If you’re feeling motivated to get more involved in your community during this time, check out your local neighborhood organization for opportunities to get engaged:


How is Ward 11 Stepping Up During COVID-19?

If you or your neighbors are thinking creatively about how to step up to help address community needs during this emergency – from making masks to donating food to supporting local businesses – I want to know about it! I’m compiling stories from our community about ways we’re helping each other, and I need your help to make sure I’m finding them all. Please email jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov to let me know what you, your family, or your group is up to. Thank you!


Wash your hands, stay home, and stay safe!

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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Ward 8 Update from Andrea Jenkins, City Council Vice President

CM Andrea Jenkins

612.673.2208

andrea.jenkins@MinneapolisMN.gov

Office Hours: Monday 9-11 a.m.

Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St.

Join City staff for Community Briefing calls hosted by NCR next week beginning May 18

city of minneapolis banner

The Neighborhood and Community Relations Department has been hosting community briefings with community leaders and organizations to share important COVID-19 information. City leaders and key staff participate in the conversations. The City hopes to learn from community what their needs and priorities are related to COVID-19. The City is committed to ensuring that communities have access to important COVID-19 information.

The City has held community briefings with African American, American Indian, East African, LGBTQIA+, Southeast Asian and Latinx communities, as well as seniors and people with disabilities.

The participants in these briefings have included community leaders and organizations, the mayor, Council members, NCR, Health, Race and Equity Division, CPED and other City staff and other jurisdictional partners.

Upcoming briefings

  • Latinx Community Briefing Mondays at 12:00 pm
    Join Microsoft Teams Meeting +1 612-276-6670   United States, Minneapolis (Toll)
  • LGBTQAI+ Community Briefing Monday, May 18th @ 1:00 pm
    Join Skype Meeting  Join by phone  Toll number:  +1 (612) 276-6670,,289733513# (Dial-in Number)
  • Senior and People with Disabilities Community Briefing Wednesday, May 20th @ 10 am
    Join Skype Meeting  Join by phone  Toll number: +1 (612) 276-6670,,462985229# (Dial-in Number)
  • African American Community Briefing Wednesday, May 20th @ 2:00 pm
    Join Skype Meeting
       Join by phone  Toll number:  +1 (612) 276-6670,,316023686# (Dial-in Number)
  • American Indian Community Briefing Thursday, May 21st @ 2:30 pm
    Join Skype Meeting
      Join by phone Toll number: +1 (612) 276-6670,,770553999# (Dial-in Number)
  • East African Community Briefing Thursday, May 21st @ 10:00 am
    Join Skype Meeting  Join by phone  Toll number: +1 (612) 276-6670,,510662499# (Dial-in Number)
  • Southeast Asian Community Briefing Friday, May 22nd @ 11:00 am
    Join Skype Meeting
       Join by phone  Toll number: +1 (612) 276-6670,,281974590# (Dial-in Number)

Sign up online to vote early by mail this election year

Request an Absentee Ballot Now

With health officials advising everyone to reduce contact with others during the pandemic, the City of Minneapolis is recommending voting early by mail this election year. Voters can sign up now to get ballots for the August primary and November general election mailed to them. Ballots will arrive approximately six weeks before those elections, along with postage-paid envelopes for return.

All Minnesota voters are eligible to vote early by mail. Ballot applications should be made no later than 10 days before an election so the ballots can arrive in the mail with enough time for voters to return them.

Although voting early by mail is recommended, voters will still be able to cast their ballots in person at the City’s Early Vote Center, 980 E. Hennepin Ave., or at their polling places on the day of the election.

Making voting safe during the pandemic

The City of Minneapolis is working closely with the Minnesota Department of Health and Hennepin County to be prepared and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is encouraging voting early by mail, and Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services supports this and other CDC and MDH recommendations to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballots this election year.

Video

Watch this video about voting by mail.

Sign up to vote by mail at vote.minneapolismn.gov.


Mayor Frey to Propose Revised 2020 Budget in June

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Financial stresses caused by the COVID-19 pandemic including a projected $100-$200 million revenue shortfall are forcing the City of Minneapolis like other governments to reassess its budget.

Budget process

The mayor will present a recommended revised 2020 budget to the City Council June 12. The City Council will hold a series of meetings in mid- and late June to hear from City staff about the impacts of the recommended revisions and make any modifications they see necessary. There will be two opportunities for the public to engage and share their voices in this process. Details are being finalized and will be released as soon as they are available.

Next steps

We have already frozen wages for all non-bargaining unit employees and are working with labor partners to implement a wage freeze across the enterprise to help guard against deeper cuts later.

Bills up before the Legislature right now could affect possible State and federal funding that would allow Minneapolis to get a share of the federal coronavirus relief bill. As of now, the City has received none, which has implications across our budget.


Upcoming Road Closures and Construction Updates

road closure

Rescheduled: Midtown Greenway closure May 19-20

The Midtown Greenway closure has been rescheduled. The Midtown Greenway will be closed from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tue, May 19 and Wed, May 20. The detour routes include:

  • Westbound bicyclists: Northbound 5th Ave. to westbound 26th St. to southbound Blaisdell Ave. to eastbound 29th St.
  • Eastbound bicyclists: Northbound Nicollet Ave. to eastbound 28th St. to southbound 5th Ave.
  • Pedestrians: Nicollet Ave., 28th St. and 5th Ave.

I-35W Project Updates

  • E Lake St, Blaisdell Ave – Nicollet Ave will be closed May 19, 3 am – 4 am for Utility locates.
  • E Lake St, 2nd – Stevens will be closed 5 am – 5 pm on Friday, May 22nd for placing the concrete bridge deck.

Road closures and congestion

  • E Lake St at 16th Ave S closed Until May 22 One lane of traffic in each direction will be maintained.
  • E Lake St at 17th Ave S on May 19 One lane of traffic in each direction will be maintained.

May 21 Lake St. closed from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m.

  • Beginning 5 a.m. Thu, May 21, Lake St. will be closed between Stevens Ave. and 2nd Ave. through 5 p.m. the same day. Motorists will be detoured to 31st St. During this time, 2nd Ave. will also be closed between 31st St. and Lake St.

All closures are weather permitting and subject to change.


Minneapolis parkways will remain open to pedestrians through at least end of June

minneapolis park and recreation board logo

Sections of eight parkways or park roads totaling 21 lane miles are closed to motor vehicles and open to pedestrians to allow more space for trail users to follow social distancing practices and limit the spread of COVID-19. Park Board staff estimates this will remain in place until at least the end of June.

Learn more about the parkway availability.


Take the census to protect services for children

we count census 2020 image

Complete the census today if you haven’t yet, and make sure to include every child that lives in your home – even babies. Census data directly affects programs and services that many community kids rely on. If children go uncounted, funding and resources for their future also go unaccounted for. And children are the largest undercounted population in the census.

Programs affected by census counts include:

  • Head Start, after school programming, technology in the classroom and special education.
  • Food assistance including free and reduced lunch.
  • Health programs for mothers and children.
  • Federal grants for higher education such as Pell Grants.

Children are the largest undercounted population in the census

While the census count for adults has improved over time, children remain the highest undercounted population in census data, and it’s actually getting worse.

Why are so many young children undercounted? Many children live in households that are historically difficult to count including: homes in hard to count neighborhoods, living with parents who rent, living in split households, and living in families with six or more children (this has led to young children being left off of the census form). Language barriers also seem to contribute where families speak a language other than English.

Counting children is vital to their future

The count of children is included in the congressional reapportionment and redistricting process, so their presence in the census is important for communities and states to receive fair representation. When young children are undercounted, the communities that they live in are denied a full voice in policy decision-making resulting in their needs not being prioritized.


The Minnesota Department of Transportation presents a Virtual Tour of the 35W@94 Project

mndot self guided tour

The Minnesota Department of Transportation wants to stay connected about the 35W@94 project while we stay at home.

Explore the project corridor through a virtual self-guided tour, watch a drone flight to see construction progress, read the project blog or download an activity book to do yourself or with kids.  Be sure to view all eight stops on the online self-guided tour to learn about the history of I-35W, project benefits and construction features like the huge water storage tanks being constructed under the road.  Each stop along the tour features artwork created by students from Lyndale Community School and Richard R. Green Central Park Elementary School in Minneapolis.

Start exploring today using the Virtual Self-Guided Tour!


Home Energy Squad now offering free virtual home energy visits in English, Spanish and Hmong

home energy squad image

As we stay home to keep each other safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, there’s a new option to help us make our homes more energy efficient and save on our energy bills. Home Energy Squad now offers virtual home energy visits, a cost-free service that complies with safety guidelines under COVID-19. The visits are available in English, Spanish and Hmong.

Through the new online-only visits, Home Energy Squad continues to help homeowners identify their best opportunities for energy savings combined with advice and planning for future projects to save even more when the time is right.

More about the virtual Home Energy Squad visit

You’ll complete a brief questionnaire to share your concerns and interests before the virtual visit. The audio/video home walk-through with energy experts typically lasts 45 minutes to an hour, resulting in a customized report complete with recommendations and next steps. You’ll also have access to cost-free telephone consultations after the virtual visit with a qualified energy advisor.

Customized for each home, the program’s benefits may include:

  • Ongoing savings on your electricity and gas bills.
  • A healthier, safer and more comfortable home.
  • Custom information and recommendations.

To participate in the virtual Home Energy Squad visit, you must be an Xcel Energy and/or CenterPoint Energy customer in Minnesota. Home Energy Squad is provided by Xcel Energy and CenterPoint Energy and delivered by the Center for Energy and Environment.

A smartphone or laptop with internet access is needed for the full experience, but a simplified virtual visit can be conducted by telephone.

Energy score for home sales

If you’re selling your home, the visit can help you decide which energy improvements to make to bring up your energy score the most. Earlier this year, the City of Minneapolis incorporated an energy report into the home sale process to help property owners understand how their homes use energy. When a home is for sale, its energy data is collected during the truth in sale of housing evaluation. This data creates an energy score that rates how energy efficient the home is. It also produces recommendations for how to improve the homes’ energy score, which makes a home more comfortable and reduces energy bills.

0% financing for recommended improvements

The City of Minneapolis works with the Center for Energy and Environment to offer a 0% loan to help residents improve the energy efficiency of their homes. If you have a remote Home Energy Squad visit or received a Home Energy Squad visit within the last three years, you are eligible to receive this funding to make energy upgrades to your home. Funding is limited and only available in 2020, so start planning now.

Energy advisors

The Home Energy Squad visit may result in recommendations on the improvements that would make the most difference for your house. Then energy advisors from the Center for Energy and Environment will provide free coaching through the energy upgrade process. Energy advisors can answer any questions you may have about the energy score or recommended energy improvements and connect you to useful resources such as quality contractors, utility rebates and the City’s 0% financing for recommended energy efficiency improvements. In 2019 alone, the Center for Energy and Environment’s energy advisors coached more than 900 homeowners through energy efficiency improvements and connected them to more than $350,000 in utility rebates.

Sign up

Sign up online or call 651-328-6220 for your virtual Home Energy Squad visit.


Routine neighborhood inspections help keep neighborhoods welcoming

city of minneapolis banner

Many Minnesotans have found themselves at home this spring to help keep each other safe, and now more than ever it’s critical to keep clean yards and green space for each other’s well-being. City inspectors will respond to 311 complaints and in limited instances go through areas with vacant properties and a history of nuisance violations. Because of added difficulties everyone is facing during the pandemic, anyone who gets a violation letter and finds complying to be a hardship is especially invited to call 311 or the number at the bottom of the letter to discuss the situation. The City is committed to balancing the needs of the community, renters and owners, and being fair, reasonable and flexible.

Planning a spring cleanup, setting a routine lawn maintenance schedule and regularly checking in on any rental properties helps keep the city beautiful, clean and safe with welcoming neighborhoods.

As temperatures warm up this week, now is a great time to:

  • Remove trash and debris.
  • Trim back vegetation overhanging the sidewalk, alley or street.
  • Mow the lawn.
  • Remove inoperable vehicles.
  • Bundle brush and branches.

Some resources exist to help older adults, veterans and disabled people.

Landlords

For landlords who have arrangements with their renters to do yard work, now is a great time to make sure they have the necessary equipment and talk about what regular upkeep expectations look like. City inspectors recommend that landlords occasionally stop by the property to see if additional supplies are needed and whether the yard work meets the expectations. Regardless of who does the yard work, responsibility ultimately lies with the property owner.

Visit minneapolismn.gov/inspections for more information on City housing and fire inspections. Find information on nuisance violations here.

To report a property in violation or to ask questions, call 311.


Gov. Walz cautiously starts turning the dial with new COVID-19 executive orders

staying home will save lives image

Gov. Tim Walz announced the next phase of the COVID-19 response in Minnesota. Citing progress made to prepare for the peak of infection, the governor announced a measured, cautious turning of the dial toward a new normal. With the stay home executive order set to expire May 18, the governor will replace it with an order continuing to encourage Minnesotans to stay close to home but allowing for gatherings of friends and family of 10 people or fewer. Minnesotans are still asked to stay close to home and limit travel to what is essential. No matter what, Minnesotans are asked not to gather in large groups. All gatherings are limited to 10, and physical distancing with masks, hand-washing and other safety measures should be followed to protect each other.

The governor will also allow retail stores and other main street businesses to open if they have a social distancing plan and operate at 50%. Additional guidance, including a template plan and checklist for businesses, is available on DEED’s website at mn.gov/deed/safework.

Acknowledging that there is no stopping the storm of COVID-19 from hitting Minnesota, the governor said that we have made great progress preparing for it.

Gov. Walz also signed executive orders strongly encouraging Minnesotans at greatest risk of serious illness to continue staying home, ensuring workers can raise concerns regarding the safety of their work environments without fear of discrimination or retaliation, and protecting workers from loss of income if they refuse to work under unsafe or unhealthy conditions.

Following the guidance of public health officials, the governor announced a preliminary set of health indicators that could trigger a decision to re-impose restrictions to slow the spread of the virus. These indicators will be refined over time as we learn more about the virus and the course of the pandemic in Minnesota.

They include the number of COVID-19 tests that can be conducted as well as the rate of increase in:

  • Number of new COVID-19 cases.
  • Percent of COVID-19 tests that are positive.
  • Percent of COVID-19 cases for which the source of infection is unknown.

Updates on the COVID-19 pandemic in Minnesota are available at mn.gov/covid19.


Minneapolis firefighters read from children’s books

storytime with a firefighter

Minneapolis firefighters read children’s books for a virtual storytime in partnership with Minneapolis Public Schools. Watch the videos here:

Storytime with the Minneapolis Fire Department: Carl Johnson reading “Lola Loves Stories.”

Storytime with the Minneapolis Fire Department: Carl Johnson reading “Blackout.”

Storytime with the Minneapolis Fire Department: Amber Lage reading “Even Superheroes Make Mistakes.”

Storytime with the Minneapolis Fire Department: Amber Wood reading “This Little Trailblazer.”

Storytime with the Minneapolis Fire Department: Bryan Tyner reading “Brave.”

Storytime with the Minneapolis Fire Department: Jenn Hall reading “Not Norman: A Goldfish Story.”


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

COVID-19 Update from the City of Minneapolis

COVID-19
COVID-19 yellow

May 13, 2020

The City of Minneapolis remains committed to delivering high quality services for residents and business in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. For an overview of the City’s response to COVID-19 and the latest impacts to City services, visit minneapolismn.gov/coronavirus.

Español | Soomaaliga | Hmoob


Sign up online to vote early by mail this year

With health officials advising everyone to reduce contact with others during the pandemic, the City of Minneapolis is recommending voting early by mail this election year. Voters can sign up now to get ballots for the August primary and November general election mailed to them. Ballots will arrive approximately six weeks before those elections, along with postage-paid envelopes for return.

All Minnesota voters are eligible to vote early by mail. Ballot applications should be made no later than 10 days before an election so the ballots can arrive in the mail with enough time for voters to return them.

Although voting early by mail is recommended, voters will still be able to cast their ballots in person at the City’s Early Vote Center, 980 E. Hennepin Ave., or at their polling places on the day of the election.

Sign up to vote by mail at vote.minneapolismn.gov.

vote-by-mail


Learn about new renter protection rules

The City of Minneapolis passed new renter protection rules that will go into effect in 2020. Starting June 1, there will be limits on what a rental property owner can use to deny rental applications, and caps on security deposits.

  • Inclusive screening criteria will set limits on what information in a renter’s criminal, rental and credit history can be used to deny a rental application. Landlords who don’t use the inclusive screening criteria will have to specifically state why an application is denied and provide an opportunity for the applicant to add more context to their history.
  • Security deposits will be capped at one month’s rent, or one-half month’s rent if the landlord requires first and last month’s rent to be paid in advance. If they require the first and last month’s rent to be paid along with the security deposit, renters must have the option to pay the security deposit in installments over three months.

The ordinance goes into effect June 1, 2020 for owners with more than 15 rental units. The effective date for property owners with 15 rental units or fewer is Dec. 1, 2020. Enforcement will be through the City’s housing maintenance code.

This follows previous renter protection efforts adopted recently, including relocation assistance for displaced renters and a requirement that owners of naturally occurring affordable housing rental property give the City 60 days’ notice before selling their units.

To learn more, visit minneapolismn.gov/renterprotections.


Check out the neighborhood census response rate map, encourage people you know to complete the census

census

Minnesota is currently number one in the nation in responding to the census. With a 69% response rate, we are 11% over the national average of 58.7%

Minneapolis is doing well also, landing at number six of large cities in the nation with populations of 300,000 or more with a response rate of 66.5%, which is close to surpassing our 2010 decennial rate of 72.8%.

However, there is still work to be done. There are several neighborhoods in Minneapolis with previously low response rates that have yet to gain real ground in their 2020 census completion. Too often communities that are underrepresented in the census are subsequently under-resourced when and where they need it the most.

View the Minneapolis neighborhood response rate map and encourage your friends, neighbors and community to complete the census. Data from the census is used to provide not only services and programs that many of our communities rely on, but also critical medical equipment and first responders during times of crises, much like the current pandemic. Data from the previous census is currently being used to determine where to send ventilators based on population numbers. Our collective response to the census is crucial to our ability to respond successfully to the needs of community.

Take the census now: www.my2020census.gov


City holding final online open house May 14 on draft Transportation Action Plan

TAP

The City is holding a final online open house May 14 to get your input on the draft Transportation Action Plan before the comment period ends May 22.

The 10-year action plan will guide future planning, design and implementation of transportation projects for all people in all the ways they move around.

Join us to hear about the plan and interact with staff in real time. Learn more at go.minneapolismn.gov/get-involved.

Upcoming online open house


Public health information: Slow the spread of COVID-19

stayhome


Resources for businesses

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Resources for workers

SST

Minneapolis sick and safe time ordinance

Under the City’s sick and safe time ordinance, employers are required to provide access to sick leave (or more generous leave) to all employees in Minneapolis. Leave must be paid by employers (unless they employ five or fewer workers) and accrual and use balances must be provided on pay stubs.

An employee’s accrued sick and safe time hours are legally protected for their use due to COVID-19 symptoms, testing or infection. Protection extends to the employee and the employee’s care of a covered family member. Learn more about how COVID-19 impacts sick and safe time protections.

Additional resources: 


Housing resources


City’s cultural radio programs now weekly

Tune into the City’s cultural radio programs for COVID-19 updates. The City has weekly programs on KMOJ 89.9 FM (English); La Raza 95.7 FM (Spanish); KALY 101.7 FM (Somali); and WIXK AM 1590 (Hmong.) Radio shows schedule


Updates from City partners


Community resources and ways to help

  • Community support: Learn how to help and find other community resources.
  • Hennepin County helpline for people impacted by COVID-19: 612-348-3000. The helpline is open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. Get help with clothing, financial assistance, groceries, medical care and equipment, and medication. Help is provided in multiple languages.
  • Hennepin County COVID-19 community resources 
  • Find tips from Meet Minneapolis on ways to support our local business community.

Explore the city’s bike trails, scenic routes

bikes

Looking for ways to enjoy the outdoors while following physical distancing guidelines? Enjoying a bike ride along one of the city’s bike trails is a great way to do that.

Check out Meet Minneapolis’ guide on the city’s most scenic bike routes.


Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

COVID 19 sign up

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please contact City Communications at communications@minneapolismn.gov.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-263-6850.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

minneapolismn.gov/coronavirus

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Ward 11 Bulletin: Jeremy Schroder, City Council Member

Jeremy schroeder

jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov

(612) 673-2211

Greetings, Ward 11!

Wishing you and yours another week of safety and health. Below you’ll find updates on COVID-19 as well as other information and resources that I hope you’ll find useful.

Please continue to check the City’s COVID-19 website regularly for information on essential services, resources to help during the pandemic, and updates on emergency regulations. If you have questions or concerns, reach me at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov or 612-673-2211. I also continue to provide real-time updates between newsletters — on our pandemic response and other things — on my official Twitter feed and my Facebook page.


Vote By Mail in 2020 Elections

The City’s Elections & Voter Services staff is working hard to keep all voters safe this election year, in coordination with the Minnesota Department of Health and Hennepin County. This includes making it quick and easy for Minneapolis residents to vote by mail. It’s a simple process, and starting tomorrow – Wednesday, May 13 – you can apply online for your ballot. Eligible voters can then expect to receive their ballot in the mail about six weeks before the August primary and the November general election. Voting by mail will help to limit person-to-person contact and the spread of COVID-19. As of now, Minneapolis polling places will be open on Election Day and folks can vote in person if they so choose. Still, I strongly encourage you to consider voting by mail as a way to prevent crowding and keeping your neighbors and yourself safe. Find more information on the City’s ongoing work to keep voters safe during this public health crisis here.


Park Board Votes to Keep Parkways Open to People

At its meeting last week, the Park Board approved plans to keep several parkways and park roads – including a section of Lake Nokomis Parkway in Ward 11 – open to pedestrians and closed to vehicles at least through June. The Park Board reconfigured the parkways last month to allow for those walking, rolling, and biking to abide by social distancing guidelines that help prevent the spread of COVID-19 while still ensuring auto access for residents. The state continues to recommend that people from separate households keep six feet between themselves and others in light of the global pandemic.

The Park Board’s resolution allocates $250,000 to cover costs associated with opened-up parkways, and the closures will remain in effect until that funding is gone. While Park Board staff estimate these funds are enough to last at least until the end of June, they are working to determine a more specific time frame and identifying potential additional funding sources. Park Board staff are also monitoring affected parkways to improve trail experience and reduce costs. Find up-to-date maps of all COVID-19 impacts to Minneapolis parkways here.


Continuing to Track COVID-19 in Minneapolis

The City continues to track the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Minneapolis using this online dashboard that shows the total number of confirmed cases in our city, how many people needed hospitalization, how many have recovered, and how many people have died. It also includes those figures for the entire state of Minnesota. Our dashboard sources data from the Minnesota Department of Health, which provides frequently updated statewide data you can review here.

It’s important to note that state health officials have estimated that for every confirmed COVID-19 case in Minnesota, there are many more cases among those who have not been tested. You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you have no symptoms. Wearing a cloth face cover helps protect other people in case you are infected and are not showing symptoms, and others’ cloth covers protect you. The CDC website offers simple instructions for making homemade cloth masks with or without sewing.


Transportation Action Plan Open House on Thursday

Join Public Work staff for the final online open house for the draft Transportation Action Plan this Thursday, May 14 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Read the draft plan and see how to participate in the open house here. This is your final opportunity to connect in real time with Public Works staff, but you can submit input on the interactive Transportation Action Plan website through May 22 to help inform the final plan. This 10-year vision will guide future planning, design and implementation of transportation projects for all people in all the ways they move around. It’s important, and I hope you’ll weigh in as part of this process.


Reminder: Gypsy Moth Treatments in Ward 11

I mentioned this in my last newsletter as well, but consider this a friendly reminder that folks in the Keewaydin and Wenonah neighborhoods may hear low-flying planes soon as part of a planned aerial treatment of the area to eliminate invasive gypsy moths that the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) found last year. The MDA will conduct two treatments between now and May 22, with exact dates based on weather conditions and caterpillar developments. The treatment area is southeast of Lake Nokomis, roughly bordered by 53rd Street, Highway 62, 23rd Avenue, and 35th Avenue. Search the MDA’s interactive map to see if your home is within the treatment area.

Gypsy moths are among America’s most destructive tree pests, having caused millions of dollars in damage to Eastern forests. The moths are now threatening the tree canopy in our community. To get rid of the moths, officials will conduct two aerial applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) over the area, spaced five to 10 days apart. Btk is a biological product that is organically certified for use on food crops. It has no known health effects for humans, pets, birds, fish, livestock, bees, and other non-caterpillar insects.

For the gypsy moth treatment to work, it must begin early in the morning. Treatments may begin as early as 5:15 a.m. Residents in and around the treatment area may be awakened on that day by the noise of a low-flying airplane. The treatment product has no known health effects for humans, but residents may wish to stay indoors during the treatment and keep windows closed for a half hour after application. Folks can cover gardens or turn on sprinklers during the treatment if they wish. You may see residue from the treatments, but it does not cause damage to outdoor surfaces – soapy water will remove any residue on outdoor items.

To help area residents stay informed, the MDA has set up an info line at 1-888-545-MOTH where folks can get the latest details about treatment dates and times. The MDA’s website also has information about gypsy moth and control efforts. Residents can sign up for text or email notifications by texting “MDA NOKOMIS” to 468-311 to receive text updates or text “MDA NOKOMIS [your email address here]” to 468-311 to receive updates via email.


Minnesota Property Tax Resources

A reminder that the Hennepin County Board last month waived late payment penalties for certain property taxpayers through July 15, providing some flexibility beyond the initial due date of May 15. To be eligible, your taxes must not be escrowed with your mortgage payment and you must owe less than $50,000 on May 15 for all properties owned. The state sets payment deadlines and has not approved an outright extension, however counties can choose to waive penalties for late payments. The County asks taxpayers who can pay even a portion by May 15 to do so. Get more information here.

Whether you’re eligible to delay your property tax payment without penalty or not, you may be able to get a property tax refund through the Minnesota Department of Revenue. Homeowners and renters can both qualify based on their income. Find more information here about refund eligibility and how to file.


Support Yourself and Each Other This Mental Health Month

Now more than ever it’s important to take steps to care for your mental health and reach out to loved ones who need extra support during these challenging times. Interruptions in routine like eating, sleep, daily structure, sense of purpose and relationships has also changed. Any of these factors as well as underlying mental health conditions such as depression or anxiety can impact one’s mental well-being. The pandemic has increased physical and social isolation for many neighbors, and that can be especially difficult for older adults.

If you have an older adult in your life, it’s important to pay attention to their mental well-being (or your own mental well-being especially if you are over 65). The National Foundation for Suicide Prevention suggests a few simple steps:

  • Check in regularly by phone or video chat.
  • Focus on enjoyable activities allowable during the pandemic such as daily exercise, listening to or playing music, reading, watching favorite shows, puzzles, games, and meditation or prayer.
  • Look for activity ideas from AARP and the National Institute on Aging.

The City of Minneapolis has assembled a list of resources highlighting basic needs for older adults and other community members here. The City has also provided $200,000 to community providers from the COVID-19 Emergency Mental Health FundFind a list of providers taking new patients of all ages here, and learn more about the City’s COVID-19 Emergency Mental Health Fund here. The Minnesota Department of Health also has a guide on supporting mental well-being during COVID-19.


Local Food Shelves Seeking Volunteers

My office has been working with Mayor Jacob Frey’s office and an interdepartmental City staff team to identify food needs during the COVID-19 crisis, to make sure that everyone is able to stay healthy and fed during the pandemic. We have learned so far that many local food shelves are seeking additional volunteer help, and I wanted to share those opportunities with you in case you’re looking for a way to pitch in:

  • Al-Maa’uun Food Shelf (1729 Lyndale Ave N) is seeking help unloading food trucks, sorting and packing food boxes, and packing meal boxes for delivery routes. Volunteers are needed Monday through Saturday for morning, mid-day, and afternoon shifts. Sign up here or call 612-521-1749 for more information.
  • Groveland Emergency Food Shelf (1800 Nicollet Ave) is seeking help receiving deliveries, stocking shelves for customers, cleaning and sanitizing, and preparing perishables for composting. Volunteers are needed in the mornings Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Spanish speakers would be especially helpful. Email dave@grovelandfoodshelf.org or call 612-871-0277 for more information.
  • Heritage Park (1000 Olson Memorial Hwy) is seeking help to drop off food at residents’ doors. Volunteers are needed Fridays from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Email dahlberg@UrbanStrategiesInc.org or call 651-230-5255 for more information.
  • Little Kitchen Food Shelf (1500 6th St NE) is seeking help packing food bags, distributing food, and managing inventory. Volunteers are needed Monday through Friday in the mornings and evenings. Email admin@gracenempls.org for more information.
  • Salvation Army Center City Office (53 Glenwood Ave). Call 612-659-0711 extension 27 for more information.
  • CAPI Food Shelf (5930 Brooklyn Blvd) is seeking help packing food boxes and distributing food to clients via a curbside delivery model. Volunteers are needed Monday through Thursday for morning and mid-day shifts. Hmong and Vietnamese speakers would be especially helpful. Email doan@capiusa.org or call 612-767-3682 for more information.
  • Good Works Food Shelf (697 13th Ave NE) is seeking help unpacking and packing food boxes and assisting with general services. Volunteers are needed Tuesday and Friday mornings. Spanish speaking volunteers would be especially helpful. Call 612-788-4829 for more information.

Donate Blood or Plasma to Help COVID-19 Recovery

While recent blood donations have helped to stabilize the supply after an unprecedented number of blood drive cancellations, it’s important to maintain that supply with donations scheduled into the future. You can still safely donate blood amid COVID-19, and healthy individuals are encouraged to schedule appointments now to help folks in need who count on lifesaving blood donations. This need is constant, pandemic or not. Folks can give blood every eight weeks. You can find donation locations and make an appointment through the Red Cross here or Memorial Blood Centers here.

Also, people who have fully recovered from COVID-19 have antibodies in their plasma that can attack the virus. Use of this plasma is being evaluated as treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening COVID-19 infections. In coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Red Cross is seeking folks who are fully recovered from COVID-19 to sign up to donate plasma to help current patients. Get more information on COVID-19 plasma donation here.


Another Resource to Help You Support Ward 11 Businesses

I’m proud of how connected our community is to its local businesses, and I’m heartened by all the ways neighbors have stepped up to support, promote, and sustain our neighborhood economy during this time. The City continues to call on leaders at the state and federal levels to adequately support local business owners and workers, and we continue to do what we can here with our more limited resources at the local level to lift up these critical community assets. The Southwest Journal recently published a great map and guide highlighting Southwest Minneapolis businesses that have adapted due to COVID-19 but remain open during this pandemic. This resource shows which businesses are still open, and it lets you know the best ways to support and connect with them. I also recommend Nokomis Living business listingsthe Tangletown Neighborhood Association small business directory, and WCCO’s curbside pick-up restaurant map for more inspiration on how you can help keep our local businesses running during this difficult time.


Having a Backyard Fire? Please Follow the Rules

With the warmer weather of spring, some neighbors are enjoying time in their yards with outdoor fires. At a time when many folks are concerned about air quality and spending a lot of time at home, it’s extra important to follow the outdoor fire laws in place to keep our neighborhoods safe and livable. If you don’t follow the law, you face fines that start at $200. Our rules state that:

  • Outdoor recreational fires are permitted between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m.
  • You must keep your fire small (less than three feet in diameter and two feet high)
  • You must postpone a fire when Minneapolis is under an air pollution advisory, because fires release fine particles that contribute to air pollution that can cause serious health concerns (sign up for air quality alerts here)
  • You can burn only untreated, unpainted, dry wood – and never cardboard boxes, trash, or debris because the smoke can be toxic
  • Fires must be at least 25 feet from a structure or combustible material and in a fire ring or pit with edges more than six inches high
  • You must have a hose or fire extinguisher on site
  • You must postpone a fire when the wind exceeds 10 miles per hour
  • Fires must be constantly attended by someone 18 years or older, and must be completely out before being abandoned

Recreational fires can have serious health impacts, especially for children, older adults, and people with existing health conditions. If neighbors say they are affected, please respect the serious medical harm you could be doing to them and extinguish the fire. It’s also good to let neighbors know in advance when you’re planning a fire, and postponing plans if the wind will blow smoke directly at their home. Learn more about air quality research in Minneapolis here.

For more information on recreational fires or to register a complaint about a recreational fire, call 311 or email Minneapolis311@minneapolismn.gov. To log a complaint about a recreational fire outside 311 hours, call 911. The Fire and Police departments are authorized to extinguish a fire immediately if it violates City ordinances. For the full Minneapolis law on recreational fires, review the Minneapolis Code of Ordinances, Chapter 178.


Explore MnDOT’s 35W Reconstruction Project from Home

The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) wants to stay connected about the 35W@94 project while we stay at home. Explore the project corridor through a virtual self-guided tour, watch a drone flight to see construction progress, read the project blog or download an activity book to do yourself or with kids.  Be sure to view all eight stops on the online self-guided tour to learn about the history of I-35W, project benefits and construction features like the huge water storage tanks being constructed under the road.  Each stop along the tour features artwork created by students from Lyndale Community School and Richard R. Green Central Park Elementary School. Start exploring with the virtual self-guided tour, drone videos, and more available here.


Art-A-Whirl Goes Online for 25th Year

As the largest open studio tour in the country, Art-A-Whirl is a signature event for the Minneapolis artists and our creative community as a whole. While folks from across the City typically gather for art, food, and entertainment, this year – the 25th for Art-A-Whirl – organizers are doing things a little differently because of COVID-19. The Art-A-Whirl Online Experience will allow you to find artists, browse their profiles and shops (with shipping and curbside pickup options), and view virtual studio tours and musical performances. The online fun begins at this link on Friday, May 15 at 5 p.m.


Doors Open Minneapolis Postponed

Doors Open Minneapolis — the weekend-long event that launched last year to allow the public free, behind-the-scenes access to Minneapolis buildings and venues that are architecturally, culturally, or socially significant – will not go on as planned this weekend. Instead, due to the global health crisis, the second-annual event has been postponed until Sept. 12 and Sept. 13. Get more information here.


Free Home Energy Efficiency Kits Available

In this challenging time for many households, Xcel Energy is offering Minneapolis customers free home energy savings kits that include materials to help you save energy and money while you’re at home. Choose from one of three kit types – they include various combinations of power strips, light bulbs, showerheads, and aerators – and it will arrive in four to six weeks. An LED light can save you more than $55 over its lifetime, while an efficient showerhead can reduce water consumption by up to 10%. In addition, kitchen and bathroom faucet aerators can reduce water and energy costs. Xcel residential customers are eligible to receive one kit per household. Get more information and submit your request here. This offer ends May 26.


Join the Zero-Waste Challenge

One surprising aspect of spending more time at home is realizing how much trash we create simply by living our lives. I know many of our neighbors are interested in taking steps to prevent waste and recycle more, and taking the Hennepin County Zero-Waste Challenge is a great way to help you take an in-depth look at what you buy and what you waste, as well as ways to reduce your impact on our waste stream and planet. The all-online challenge, which runs from May 17 to June 27, outlines more than 100 actions you can take on a one-time or daily basis. Participants can access resources to meet waste reduction goals and receive support along the way. In past years, participants reported reducing their daily waste by nearly one-third! Sign up for the Zero-Waste Challenge today to get started.


Amid COVID-19 Spring Cleaning, Donation Centers Reopen

Many households have used extra time at home to clean house, and that includes going through clothing, furniture, and other items. Now, after a hiatus due to COVID-19, some donation centers are reopening and once again accepting donations with safety protocols in place:

  • Bridging is a nonprofit that helps support housing stability for folks across the Twin Cities and accepts new and gently used basic home essentials including furniture, beds, housewares, linens, lamps, and small appliances
  • Arc’s Value Village is a nonprofit that accepts clothing and other household items like backpacks, bikes, cookware, games, decorations, jewelry, furniture, luggage, office supplies, and more (but please keep clothing items separate from others)

Before you drop off donations, check the donation center’s website for a full list of acceptable materials, hours, and instructions for preparing your items in addition to pandemic safety precautions. Please note that wait times may be long as donation centers begin to reopen. And finally, do not dump items outside donation centers when they are not open – donation centers then have to cover disposal costs.


Ward 11 Community Response to COVID-19

If you or your neighbors are thinking creatively about how to step up to help address community needs during this emergency – from making masks to donating food to supporting local businesses – I want to know about it! I’m compiling stories from our community about ways we’re helping each other, and I need your help to make sure I’m finding them all. Please email jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov to let me know what you, your family, or your group is up to. Thank you!


Ways to Get Engaged

I’m excited to pick up where we left off with a few new Community Conversations – though, for the foreseeable future, we’ll have to meet virtually. All Ward 11 residents are welcome to join in and share questions, concerns, and ideas at the following times:

If you’re feeling motivated to get more involved in your community during this time, check out your local neighborhood organization for opportunities to get involved in your immediate community:


Wash your hands, stay home, and stay safe!

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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This email was sent using GovDelivery Communications Cloud on behalf of the City of Minneapolis · 350 South 5th Street · Minneapolis MN 55415 · 1-800-439-1420 GovDelivery logo

Ward 8 Update: Andrea Jenkins, City Council Vice President

CM Andrea Jenkins

612.673.2208

andrea.jenkins@MinneapolisMN.gov

Office Hours: Monday 9-11 a.m.

Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St.

May is Mental Health Month: Find ways to support mental well-being during the pandemic

may mental health month 2020

Now more than ever it’s important to take steps to care for your mental health and reach out to loved ones who need extra support during these challenging times.

May is Mental Health Month and Thursday, May 7, is National Older Adult Mental Health Awareness Day. The pandemic has increased physical and sometimes social isolation for older adults in Minneapolis.

Interruptions in routine like eating, sleep, daily structure, sense of purpose and relationships has also changed. Any of these factors as well as underlying mental health conditions such as depression or anxiety can impact one’s mental well-being.

If you have an older adult in your life, it’s important to pay attention to their mental well-being (or your own mental well-being especially if you are over 65). The National Foundation for Suicide Prevention suggests a few simple steps:

  • Check in regularly by phone or video chat.
  • Focus on enjoyable activities allowable during the pandemic such as daily exercise, listening to or playing music, reading, watching favorite shows, puzzles, games, and meditation or prayer.
  • Look for activity ideas from AARP and the National Institute on Aging.

The City of Minneapolis has assembled a list of resources highlighting basic needs for older adults here.

The City has also provided $200,000 to community providers from the COVID-19 Emergency Mental Health FundFind a list of providers taking new patients here, and learn more about the City’s COVID-19 Emergency Mental Health Fund here.

The Minnesota Department of Health also has a guide on supporting mental well-being during COVID-19.


Starting on May 13, you can apply online for your ballots for the August State Primary and November General Election

your vote your count image

All MN voters are eligible to vote early by mail. To minimize direct contact with others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages you to vote by mail.

Starting on May 13, you may apply online for your ballot. Our next election is the State Primary on August 11.

The City’s Division of Elections and Voter Services is doing everything they can to ensure a safe election season for you. This includes keeping you up-to-date as conditions change. They have created a new Voting + COVID-19 landing page to help you navigate your voting options, including voting by mail.


COVID-19 Testing Sites and Information available on the Minnesota Department of Health’s Website

minneapolis testing sites

Where can I get tested for COVID-19?

COVID-19 testing facilities are located across the state of Minnesota. To find the nearest testing location in your community, click on the MN COVID-19 Testing Locations web page. PLEASE NOTE: This site changes on a daily and sometimes hourly basis based on testing demand and supply availability across the United States. This website is updated regularly, but may not immediately reflect changes at a particular clinic throughout the day. Here are the testing facilities in/right by North Minneapolis: NorthPoint Health & Wellness (1313 Penn Ave N, 612-543-2500), North Memorial Health Clinic- Camden (4209 Webber Pkwy, 763-581-5750), and North Memorial Health Hospital (3300 Oakdale Ave N, 763-581-3550).

Is testing free?

Federal law requires health insurance plans to cover diagnostic and serological or antibody testing AT NO COST to patients. There may be charges associated with the visit to obtain the testing, but most health insurance companies in Minnesota have waived copays, coinsurance, and deductibles associated with these charges. Check with your insurance company for more details.

What should I do if I don’t have health insurance?

If you don’t have health insurance- you may be eligible for coverage. Contact Mnsure or the Minnesota Department of Human Services to learn more about coverage options.


Volunteer Mask Drive for Nursing Home Patients– everyone can help!

Mask Drive Image

No creativity required! Anyone can help. The Making and Sharing Kindness (MASKs) group was started by four volunteers and has grown to an army for good of over 100. Please join MASKs in supplying fabric masks to nursing home residents, other residents in congregate care facilities, day cares etc.

CAN YOU SEW? If you know how to use your sewing machine MASKs can provide sewing kits filled with pre-washed and cut fabric and elastic. Instructions and thread are available.

CAN YOU KNIT OR CROCHET? If you have knitting needles or a crochet hook, you can create “ear savers” that allow residents to keep their masks on all day without irritating their ears. MASKs will supply 100% cotton, instructions, buttons and thread. And the button sewing is optional!

CAN YOU MAKE STUFF WITH YOUR 3-D PRINTER? You can create plastic “ear savers” that allow residents to keep their masks on all day without irritating their ears. MASKs will supply instructions and can provide more filament.

NOT A CRAFTER OR SEWER? You can pick up and drop off materials to crafters, wash iron and precut fabric, donate supplies or donate $ to buy supplies.

MASKs IS ACCEPTING DONATIONS OF

  • 100% cotton fabric – quilting weight is perfect. (If you don’t know what it is made of do not donate it! Polyester blends are hot and hard to breathe through)
  • 100% flannel fabric
  • 1/8” & ¼” elastic in any color, any amount
  • Spools of thread – especially in neutral colors
  • 100% cotton yarn
  • Plastic buttons measuring ½” to 1”
  • A gift card to Lakes Makerie to buy fabric. This locally owned shop is provides a 20% discount. Lakesmakerie/products/gift-card   When you receive your gift card forward it to maskmaking2020@gmail.com
  • Make a cash or credit card donation in person at Pumphouse Creamery. All proceeds will be used to buy materials. COMING SOON you’ll be able buy fabric masks on line from pumphouse-creamery.com

DROP OFF FOR ALL NON- MONETARY DONATIONS In the blue or yellow tub outside of 14 Hill Gift Shop at 4737 Chicago Ave S.

DROP OFF FOR ALL CASH DONATIONS Pumphouse Creamery at 4754 Chicago Ave S. from 12pm-6pm

Please contact MASKs if you have any questions at maskmaking2020@gmail.com


Look out for the new Census 2020 PSA by Comcast and Complete the census for our future generations!

census 2020 psa by comcast

Now more than ever, it’s important that all people are counted so that we receive the necessary resources required to meet our needs. The 2010 Census count currently plays a significant role in government response to our current pandemic. Completing the census is vital to the future of our communities and the process is easy, safe and confidential.

Complete the census in the safety of your own home:

  • Online at my2020census.gov
  • By Phone
    • 1-844-330-2020
  • Or via mail
    • Simply fill out the form you receive in the mail and return in the envelope provided.

Help get out the count!

Visit the City of Minneapolis’ web page here to learn more about historically undercounted communities and projections for 2020. Compare national data and learn more about census tract demographics by visiting the US Census Bureau’s web page here. Currently, Minnesota ranks number one in the country, at 68.1%, for self-response! However, there is still much work to be done to ensure all people are counted in Minneapolis.

Organizations and individuals can help place calls directly to community members to encourage them to complete their census form. The MN State Demographers office is providing access to a predictive dialer system which will allow individuals to make calls from the comfort of their own home.

Phone banking shifts are available 1:00-4:00pm (days vary) or 5:00-8:00pm (days vary). If you would like to call into a specific neighborhood or geographic location, we ask that you organize a volunteer call team of at least 10 individuals and designate a team lead.

Training for team leads and then to the entire team will be provided at the beginning of each shift.

Please send sign-up if you or your neighborhood/community organization would like to Get Out The Count.

Translated materials and resources

The City of Minneapolis has translated census outreach materials that are available on our resources page:

Visit minneapolismn.gov/census/wecountresources for information in:

  • Hmong
  • Lao
  • Somali
  • Spanish
  • English
  • Other major languages.

Youth leaders develop videos highlighting the importance of physical distancing

youth coordinating board tik tok video

Youtube videos about Physical Distancing

Youth leaders in Minneapolis have collaborated on a video series with the City’s Health Department to stress the importance of physical distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Learn more about the Minneapolis Youth Coordinating Board.

Check out the City’s Youth Tik Tok Competition with C.E.O on COVID-19 facts

Violence is preventable and so is COVID-19. The Office of Violence Prevention in partnership with C.E.O. (Change Equals Opportunity) launched a TikTok competition for youth to create videos with COVID facts in a way that’s relevant to them. Link to TikTok account: https://vm.tiktok.com/7hAB8h/.


Take survey by May 31: How should the City focus its violence prevention efforts?

city of minneapolis banner

Take this survey by May 31 to help guide the City’s violence prevention priorities for the next three-five years. It only takes a few minutes to share your thoughts on what forms of violence are most pressing in our community.

Knowing violence affects so many different communities in so many different ways and yet having limited resources, we need your feedback to help develop a citywide approach to addressing violence in a new strategic plan.

If you’d like to use the survey in an alternative format or a different language, email research.health@minneapolismn.gov.


Food Resources available in Ward 8

food shelf
  • Sabathani Community Center, 310 E 38th St.
    • Monday – Thursday, 10am-2pm, food shelf located in the basement.
    • Call 612-821-2300 9am-3pm to reach the Administrative staff for information or assistance.
  • Bancroft School, 1315 E 38th St
    • Mondays, 10am-2pm, MPS is providing FREE meals to any child 18 years and younger at this location while schools are closed due to COVID-19.
  • MLK Park, 4055 Nicollet Ave and Green School, 3416 4th Ave S
    • Tuesdays, 10am-2pm, MPS is providing FREE meals to any child 18 years and younger at this location while schools are closed due to COVID-19.
  • Lyndale School, 312 W 34th St
    • Wednesdays, 10am-2pm, MPS is providing FREE meals to any child 18 years and younger at this location while schools are closed due to COVID-19.
  • Calvary Lutheran Church, 3901 Chicago Ave, (612) 827-2504
    • Food shelf open Saturdays, 9am-noon.
  • Incarnation Catholic Church, 3801 Pleasant Ave, (612) 822-2101
    • Food shelf open Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 am-2:30 pm.
  • The Aliveness Project, 3808 Nicollet Ave, (612) 824-5433
    • Food shelf and to go meals available Monday – Thursday, 12-6 pm; Fri, 12-4 pm.
  • Bethel Lutheran Church, 4120 S 17th Ave, (612) 724-3693
    • free little pantry to take what you need.
  • Macedonia Baptist Church, 3801 1st Ave S, (612) 827-4608
    • Food shelf open every 4th Wednesday of the month, 1-3pm.

Having a backyard recreational fire this spring?

recreational fire information

With the warmer weather of spring, some Minneapolis neighbors are enjoying time staying at home with outdoor fires. Following these laws will help keep Minneapolis neighborhoods safe and livable:

  • Outdoor recreational fires are permitted between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m.
  • Keep fires small: less than three feet in diameter and two feet high.
  • Postpone a fire when Minneapolis is under an air pollution advisory. Fires release fine particles that contribute to air pollution and are implicated in a number of health problems including strokes, heart attacks and asthma. Sign up for air quality alerts at http://mn.enviroflash.info.
  • Burn only untreated, unpainted, dry wood. Never burn cardboard boxes, trash or debris, because the smoke can be toxic.
  • Fire must be at least 25 feet away from a structure or combustible material and in a fire ring or pit with edges more than six inches high.
  • Have a hose or fire extinguisher present.
  • Postpone the fire when the wind exceeds 10 mph.
  • Fire must be constantly attended by someone 18 years or older and completely out before being abandoned.

Illegal open burning or recreational fires could result in fines that start at $200.

Be a good neighbor

These simple suggestions could help neighbors be considerate of each other when having a fire:

  • Letting neighbors know when planning a fire.
  • Postponing a fire when smoke will blow directly at a neighbor’s house or when still weather conditions prevent smoke from moving away at all.
  • Understanding that recreational fires can have serious health impacts, especially for children, older adults and people with existing health conditions. If neighbors say they are affected, please respect the serious medical harm a fire could be doing to them and extinguish the fire.

Below are links to videos in English, Spanish, Somali and Hmong on how to have a safe recreational fire in Minneapolis:

Recreational fires in the city Here’s what you need to know when having a recreational fire in Minneapolis.

Fogatas en la Ciudad (Spanish) Esto es lo que tienes que saber cuándo hagas una fogata en Minneapolis.

Qor-yo gub ka magaalada (Somali) Waa tanaa waxaad u baahantahey mar ka aad dooney-sid in aad dibada ku shidid dab gudaha miniyaabolis.

Hluav taws los yog bonfire hauv nroog (Hmong) Ntwam no yuav qhia koj txoj cov hluav taws nyob nruam zoo hauv nroog Minneapolis.

For more information on recreational fires or to register a complaint about a recreational fire, call 311 or email Minneapolis311@minneapolismn.gov, or to register a complaint about a recreational fire outside 311 hours, call 911. The Fire and Police departments are authorized to extinguish a fire immediately if it violates City ordinances.

For the Minneapolis law on recreational fires, visit the Minneapolis Code of Ordinances, Chapter 178 at www.minneapolismn.gov/government/ord/index.htm.

Learn more about air quality research in Minneapolis here.


Gov. Walz extends stay-at-home order to May 18

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Everyone can work to reduce the spread of COVID-19

  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or sleeve, or a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands afterwards.
  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom or before eating. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face – especially your eyes, nose and mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you have cold- or flu-like symptoms, for 10 days after your illness onset and three days after your fever resolves without fever reducing medicine (whichever is longer), and avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Up-to-date guidance from the Department of Health on recommended community mitigation strategies can be found here.

Resources


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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Ward 8 Update from Andrea Jenkins, City Council Vice President

CM Andrea Jenkins

612.673.2208

andrea.jenkins@MinneapolisMN.gov

Office Hours: Monday 9-11 a.m.

Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St.

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Dear Neighbors,

I hope that everyone is healthy and well. I want to sincerely thank you for continuing  sheltering in place per Governor Walz orders. The flattening of the curve would not be possible without your compliance and support. I want to thank all of the neighborhood organizations for stepping up and addressing some of the needs and concerns of their respective neighbors. I wanted to highlight, at the suggestion of one of our neighbors, the food shelves that are operating in Ward 8. These would be great opportunities for volunteers or financial support from neighborhood organizations or individuals:

  • Sabathani Community Center, 310 E 38th St.
    • Monday – Thursday, 10am-2pm, food shelf located in the basement.
    • Call 612-821-2300 9am-3pm to reach the Administrative staff for information or assistance.
  • Bancroft School, 1315 E 38th St
    • Mondays, 10am-2pm, week’s supply of lunch meals for each child under 18 attending MPS school.
  • MLK Park, 4055 Nicollet Ave and Green School, 3416 4th Ave S
    • Tuesdays, 10am-2pm, week’s supply lunch meals for each child under 18 attending MPS school.
  • Lyndale School, 312 W 34th St
    • Wednesdays, 10am-2pm, week’s supply lunch meals for each child under 18 attending MPS school.
  • Calvary Lutheran Church, 3901 Chicago Ave, (612) 827-2504
    • Food shelf open Saturdays, 9am-noon.
  • Incarnation Catholic Church, 3801 Pleasant Ave, (612) 822-2101
    • Food shelf open Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 am-2:30 pm.
  • The Aliveness Project, 3808 Nicollet Ave, (612) 824-5433
    • Food shelf and to go meals available Monday – Thursday, 12-6 pm; Fri, 12-4 pm.
  • Bethel Lutheran Church, 4120 S 17th Ave, (612) 724-3693
    • free little pantry to take what you need.
  • Macedonia Baptist Church, 3801 1st Ave S, (612) 827-4608
    • Food shelf open every 4th Wednesday of the month, 1-3pm.

Lastly, I want to offer my deep condolences to anyone who has lost a loved one during this time or is caring for someone who is ill, we see you and send our love and support. Wash your hands, stay safe.

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Gov. Walz extends stay-at-home order to May 18

Mn stay at home extension

To continue Minnesota’s success in slowing the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Tim Walz extended the state’s stay-at-home order and closure of bars, restaurants and other public accommodations until May 18. The governor also announced that retail businesses and other non-critical businesses may resume operations with curbside pickup.

Also as part of this executive order, Governor Walz strongly encouraged all Minnesotans to wear a manufactured or homemade mask at all times when they leave their homes to any place where physical distancing is difficult.

By extending the stay home order, the governor said the state will:

  • Slow the spread of COVID-19 and slowly build herd immunity.
  • Protect those working on the front lines by increasing access to personal protective equipment.
  • Ensure our health system can care for all who require care.
  • Gradually allow more Minnesotans to return to work.
  • Safely and slowly resume in-person contacts and other activities that are critical for our well-being.

Starting May 4, retail businesses and other non-critical businesses may begin offering curbside pickup. This will put up to 30,000 Minnesotans back to work in a safe, coordinated way. Businesses must:

  • Develop and publicly post a plan for how to open safely.
  • Use online payment whenever possible.
  • Employees and customers should wear masks and protective equipment.
  • In curbside pickup scenarios, physical distancing guidelines apply. If possible, customers should not leave their vehicle.
  • In delivery scenarios, items should be deposited outside a customer’s residence.

Minnesotans should also continue to work remotely whenever possible, wear face masks in public, screen for symptoms and regularly check their temperature, and maintain physical distance from each other.

Updates on the COVID-19 pandemic in Minnesota are available at mn.gov/covid19.


Mayor Frey delivers State of the City address

mayor frey during state of the city address

Mayor Jacob Frey taped and released his third State of the City address on Wednesday, April 29.

In his remarks, Frey highlighted the City’s response to COVID-19, Minneapolis’ role – as the largest and densest city in the state – in protecting public health, and emphasized the City’s commitment to continue delivering core services.

Watch Mayor Frey’s State of the City address.


In Case You Missed it: You can view the recording of the 4/28 Ward 8 Virtual Town Hall on our Facebook Page

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This past Tuesday, I hosted a virtual town hall to address COVID-19 alongside Mayor Jacob Frey and the Deputy Commissioner of Health Noya Woodrich. In addition to an update on the City’s response to COVID-19, we facilitated a discussion on the Neighborhoods 2020 Program Guidelines with Neighborhood and Community Relations Director David Rubedor and CURA’s Director of Community Research C. Terrence Anderson and heard from 3rd Precinct Inspector Sean McgGinty for a brief update on Public Safety.

If you were unable to tune into Tuesday’s Virtual Town Hall, you can view a recording on the Ward 8 Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/162851104524976/videos/3749837288420009/.


Federal funding and other resources for small business relief

Minneapolis Small Business logo

The U.S. government approved new funding for small business relief including two key programs: the Paycheck Protection Program and the Economic Injury Disaster Loan. As of Monday, April 27, the Paycheck Protection Program is accepting new applications.

Small businesses can talk to their lender today or contact a lender on the list of participating lenders in Minnesota. The Economic Injury Disaster Loans has gotten additional funding as well and will resume processing applications that are already in the queue on a first come, first-served basis. The SBA is not currently accepting new applications for this program.

Other resources include:

The City of Minneapolis has expanded Business Technical Assistance Program services to make sure that you have an expert to talk to about your specific situation. You can also contact the City’s Small Business Team at 612-673-2499 or smallbusiness@minneapolismn.gov.


Homemade cloth face masks needed, donate by May 8

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There’s still time to donate homemade masks at your local fire station. Donated masks will be delivered to Minneapolis residents at high risk for contracting COVID-19 and the community organizations that serve them. Your donation will help protect our most vulnerable residents.
Note: fire stations are not equipped to take any other donations at this time.

Find your local Minneapolis fire station at: http://www.minneapolismn.gov/fire/stations/index.htm…

Need instructions for making a cloth mask?

Learn more about guidelines on making homemade masks by visiting the State’s web page on the Minnesota Homemade Mask Drive (please disregard the April 25 donation drive end date listed on this site; Minneapolis fire stations will continue to collect donated masks through May 8). Visit: https://mn.gov/covid19/for-minnesotans/volunteer/masks.jsp…

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends wearing cloth face coverings to help protect others from COVID-19. Cloth face masks can help prevent the wearer from infecting others – especially in situations when we can spread the virus without having any symptoms.


Let’s Come Together/apART, how to participate in the Chicago Ave Fire Arts Center Public Art Project

CAFAC Art Project

The Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center (CAFAC) invites the greater Powderhorn community to join us in the creation of Together/apART, a public art and cultural documentation project inspired by how we are all moving through life during the Covid-19 pandemic. This project aims to be a community bonding and solidarity experience, carried out collectively while we are literally isolated in our own homes. Together (while apART), we will create an artistic mixed material quilt that will stretch across CAFAC’s parking yard fence, located at the busy corner of 38th and Chicago. Together/apART asks you to reflect on your experiences during this time of challenge and change and to interpret them through imagery, words, or symbols, which CAFAC will cut into steel and incorporate into a public art installation.

Find more details and how to get involved here!


Mayor, council members reallocate office funds to support community during pandemic

city of minneapolis banner

Today, council members approved cutting their ward budgets in order to help communities protect themselves from COVID-19. Each ward office will reduce their budgets by $4,081 and the Mayor’s Office will reduce its budget by $10,000, freeing up $63,000 to purchase face masks, hand sanitizer, thermometers and other disease prevention resources. These will be prioritized for low-income residents.

Plans call for using the funds to order 15,000 cloth masks, with 3,000 of them going to the Minnesota Public Housing Authority for their residents and the rest going to multi-unit low-income housing residents. The funds will also be used to purchase hand sanitizer and additional supplies to support priority community groups like those in shelters and low-income housing.


35W@94 Downtown to Crosstown Construction Updates

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Overnight I-35W closures May 4-7

I-35W will be closed in both directions between Hwy 62 and I-94 from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. nightly beginning Mon, May 4 through Thu, May 7. Drivers will be detoured to use Hwy 62, Hwy 100 and I-394.

Midtown Greenway closure May 7-8

As a reminder, the Midtown Greenway will be closed from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thu, May 7 and Fri, May 8 to allow crews to safely set the bridge deck beams on the new northbound I-35W bridge over the Midtown Greenway. The detour routes include:

  • Westbound bicyclists: Northbound 5th Ave. to westbound 26th St. to southbound Blaisdell Ave. to eastbound 29th St.
  • Eastbound bicyclists: Northbound Nicollet Ave. to eastbound 28th St. to southbound 5th Ave.
  • Pedestrians: Nicollet Ave., 28th St. and 5th Ave.

All closures are weather permitting and subject to change.

Stay connected

For real-time travel information anywhere in Minnesota visit 511mn.org or dial 5-1-1.


City of Minneapolis makes additional changes to transportation network in response to pandemic

stay healthy streets routes

The City of Minneapolis is making additional updates to the public right-of-way in response to COVID-19, including adding more space for active recreation on streets and reducing the need for pedestrian push buttons at intersections.

Starting April 29, the City will implement 11 miles of Stay Healthy Streets routes to support more space for walking, biking and rolling while social distancing. Three separate loop routes will mostly follow local residential streets. These local streets will generally be closed to thru traffic and calmed to allow for people to safely walk, bike or roll in the street. Car access for residents will be retained. Additional details on Stay Healthy Streets are available on the City’s website.

A new loop along the Mississippi River has opened up space for active recreation. The southbound lane of East River Parkway in Minneapolis and Mississippi River Boulevard in Saint Paul has been opened to walking, biking, and rolling from Fulton Street Southeast to Ford Parkway. This is in addition to expanded walking space in the northbound lane of West River Parkway. Working with Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, the cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul will create additional space on bridges to complete a connected six and 10-mile loops.

The City will continue to monitor and adjust street installations.

Pedestrian push buttons

The City has transitioned traffic signals to reduce the need for pedestrians to push the button at more than 400 signalized intersections. Crews are placing signs on the signal post notifying people that the signal will change automatically. For blind and visually impaired people, the button will still be operational in order to call the audible features.

Pick-up only permits

The City’s Public Works Department has issued permits for and installed more than 50 pick-up only zones for businesses. The pick-up zones allow parking for up to 10 minutes for people picking up take-out food or other items.

New speed limit signs

In addition to the changes in response to the pandemic, the City continues to roll out new speed limits signs citywide. The Cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul announced lower speed limits to support safer streets March 12.

New speed limits are 20 mph for local residential streets; 25 mph for larger, arterial city-owned streets; and 30-plus mph for a few city-owned streets. Per Minnesota law, cities do not have the authority to change speed limits on county and MnDOT roads.

The 25 mph speed limit on individual streets will go into effect as soon as they are signed. Once the busier streets are signed, the cities will then install “gateway signs” at entry points in both cities, indicating the citywide speed limit is 20 mph unless otherwise posted.  The 20 mph speed limit goes in to effect as soon as the gateway signs are installed. The cities expect the sign installation to be completed by this fall. To follow along on our progress visit:  visionzerompls.com and stpaul.gov/speedlimits.


City helping support mental health for Minneapolis residents during COVID-19

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The City of Minneapolis has awarded $200,000 from the COVID-19 Emergency Mental Health Fund to 29 community organizations providing mental health care to the community.

The City’s Division of Race & Equity established the fund to strengthen the capacity of mental and behavioral health providers and community cultural healers to provide services to community residents who may be experiencing increased stress and trauma related to the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic.

The goal is to provide short-term relief to those who are experiencing crisis and whose ability to receive help in person is either limited or not available at this time. Services include psychotherapy, group healing circles, counseling, mentoring services, resource sharing and peer support.

The organizations are continuing care with existing clients who are no longer able to meet in person as a result of social distancing, and several of them are also expanding their services to reach a larger population. More than 80% of the people receiving services are black, indigenous and people of color.

List of providers taking new patients

Find a list of providers taking new patients here, and learn more about the City’s COVID-19 Emergency Mental Health Fund here.

The State of Minnesota is also offering mental health support resources.


An additional online open house added for the draft Transportation Action Plan on May 14

transportation action plan photo

The City added another online open house to get your input on the draft Transportation Action Plan before the comment period ends May 22.

The 10-year action plan will guide future planning, design and implementation of transportation projects for all people in all the ways they move around.

Join us to hear about the plan and interact with staff in real time. Learn more at go.minneapolismn.gov/get-involved.

Upcoming online open house


Shop safely at the farmers market, What to expect at farmers markets

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COVID-19 affects some of the ways you can safely move around at farmers markets this season. As with any other essential trip, farmers market customers will want to plan ahead to get in and out, go as one person rather than a family, wear a mask, preorder if possible and of course keep 6 feet away from others.

Farmers markets are considered essential grocery providers by the State of Minnesota and can stay open under specific conditions that help prevent the spread of the coronavirus including:

  • Shoppers stay at least 6 feet from each other and workers.
  • All food is taken offsite before eating.

Shoppers can expect to see safety precautions set up at farmers markets such as:

  • Borders set up around the market with limited entrances and exits.
  • A limited number of customers in the market at one time. There may be a wait.
  • Wider aisles with one-way movement and waiting areas.
  • Credit card and no-touch transactions preferred.
  • Hand-washing or hand sanitation stations.
  • No samples offered.

And as with any other essential shopping during this time, make sure to:

  • Stay home if you or someone in your home is sick.
  • Send only one person into the market to shop.
  • Wear a cloth face covering.
  • Wash hands frequently.
  • Maintain a 6-foot distance from anyone else.
  • Be efficient and not mingle.
  • Not touch products until the vendor hands you your purchase.
  • Preorder online if possible.

Farmers markets are an important part of our food supply and are essential to our farmers. There has never been a more important time to buy local and contribute to a healthy local food economy.

Find a map and schedule for farmers markets in Minneapolis here. The City expects about 22 markets to open this season. The map and schedule will be kept up to date as schedules shift.


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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