Author Archives: Steven Date

Andrea Jenkins: Ward 8 Update

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Hello Neighbors,

We are experiencing some of the most challenging times this City has ever witnessed. The City Council met earlier today to discuss an amended budget proposal submitted by Mayor Frey, which would make some very difficult cuts to programs that will be very painful. We have several growing encampments throughout the city including a very large one at Powderhorn Park. City leaders and staff are responding to the devastation of small businesses and lives along Lake Street, Broadway Ave and Cedar-Riverside. And as many of you know there is an unprecedented amount of violence that is being perpetrated in our communities and communities around the country as a result of the murder of George Floyd and other unarmed Black people. I want to assure folks that the City is working hard to address these issues and some of the measures being taken are identified below.

Any one of these crisis’ would be all consuming and challenging to find solutions, but all of them together can begin to feel overwhelming. I am attempting to approach these challenges methodically; we are developing a community engagement strategy to collaborate with community on the best way to bring stability and safety to the intersection of 38th and Chicago and the surrounding area. We are working with multiple jurisdictions to address the homeless crisis, and my colleagues and I are working to create a Public Safety Continuum that keeps everyone safe in our community. I know there is a lot of consternation and uncertainty about the future, there is a desire for the council to have a “plan”. But that is where community comes in, there is a charter amendment proposal that has been submitted to a Hennepin County Judge appointed Charter Commission. That proposal among other things would replace the existing charter department (MPD) with a Department of Public Safety and Crime Prevention. But this only happens if the Charter Commission puts this on the ballot and then you, the voters determine that we should pursue this. If voters determined that we should, then we would embark upon a year long process with all residents that want to engage to determine what the Department of Public Safety and Crime Prevention would consist of.

I supported this proposal because in my opinion is represents true democracy, it puts the question to the voters and invites the public to be a part of shaping what comes next. Folks, we are at a very pivotal moment in American history. There has been an unequal balance of power for far too long. Some people have been fine with that as they benefit from the ways our society functions. However, many people have not been ok with the status quo for a very long time, now those voices are finally being heard and it has come time for us as a society to determine how we live together in the future. As the councilmember of the 8th Ward, I ask for your engagement, your patience and most of all your humanity as we work to solve these centuries in the making issues.

Sincerely,

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Public hearings set for July 15 and 21 on the proposed charter amendment creating new Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention

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I’ve heard from many of you about the proposed amendment to the City Charter related to the future of public safety in our city. The Charter Commission is seeking public comments on the proposed charter amendment and will host two public hearings in the coming weeks. People can submit their comments online or provide them directly to members of the commission at a public hearing on Wednesday, July 15 or July 21.

The proposed amendment, submitted by the City Council, proposes removing the Police Department from the charter and adding a new Community Safety & Violence Prevention Department. Under State law, the Charter Commission is required to review and submit its recommendation(s) on the proposed amendment before a ballot question can be presented to voters.

The virtual public hearings will take place at 5 p.m. Wednesday, July 15, and at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 21. Participation instructions will be published on the City’s website. If you’re interested in speaking at either or both of the public hearings, you can pre-register using the online registration form.

Other ways to comment:

The City Council voted June 26 to advance the proposal as a ballot measure to be considered by Minneapolis voters.

Under state law, the Charter Commission has at least 60 days to complete its review and submit its recommendation to the City Council. The statutory deadline for submitting questions on the Nov. 3 general election ballot is Friday, Aug. 21. If approved by voters, the changes would become effective May 1, 2021.

For more information about this process, please visit the City’s webpage for the proposed charter amendment as well as the newly developed frequently asked questions section.

You can also watch the Wednesday, July 8 Charter Commission Meeting where the five Council Members that authored of the amendment presented to the commission and stood for questions.


The City’s response to unsheltered homelessness and growing encampments

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Minneapolis has experienced an unprecedented growth in homeless encampments since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. There are several large encampments citywide with the largest currently at Powderhorn Park in south Minneapolis. There are roughly 100 encampments throughout the city, most of which are small in size.

Response

The City is working with Hennepin County to help connect people experiencing homelessness to housing, shelter and services while preserving dignity and respect. The response includes:

  • The City has placed more than 15 hygiene stations throughout the city including portable toilets, handwashing stations, used syringe containers and trash receptables.
  • The City Health Department is coordinating public health services at large encampments.
  • Officers from the Minneapolis Police Department Homeless and Vulnerable Persons Initiative deliver food and water and help people access resources.
  • The City works with contracted outreach providers to connect encampment residents with services, shelter and housing.
  • The City and County will work with community partners to secure federal COVID-19 funding to expand outreach and rapid rehousing services and expand long-term culturally appropriate shelter capacity.

Affordable housing

Housing ends homelessness, and the City and County have significantly increased investments in affordable housing development in 2019 and 2020, with priority for housing serving people experiencing homelessness.

  • Since 2006, the City has provided more than $68 million to help develop more than 900 units of supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness.
  • About 290 new units for people experiencing homelessness will close on financing from City and County, State and/or Minneapolis Public Housing Authority (MPHA) funding programs and start construction in 2020.
  • We are working with partners to prevent evictions during this time of crisis. The City made $3 million available for Emergency Housing Assistance for people who have lost income due to COVID.
  • The County has made $15 million available for Emergency Housing Assistance through CARES Act funds. Applications for County housing assistance are currently being accepted.

Find out more on the City website.


Public hearings scheduled for July 14 and 22 on the revised 2020 City budget

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The City Council’s Budget Committee will hold two public hearings, July 14 and 22, on proposed revisions to the City’s 2020 budget. The City is facing approximately $156 million in projected revenue losses because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Revised budget proposal

Mayor Jacob Frey presented the second phase of his revised budget proposal to the City Council’s Budget Committee on Thursday, July 9th. The proposal avoids mass layoffs of City employees by relying on existing spending freezes, use of cash reserves, program cuts and furloughs. The budget also prioritizes preserving housing, economic development and racial equity work that will benefit the communities of color who have been hit hardest by COVID-19.

Frey’s Phase 1 response to the impact of COVID had included spending and hiring freezes and has saved approximately $58 million to date.

Public hearings

Engage and share your voice in this process during two online public hearings:

  • 6:05 p.m. Tuesday, July 14
  • 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 22

The City Council is scheduled to hold a budget markup July 17 and vote July 24 on a revised 2020 budget.

You can watch the online meetings and participate in the online public hearings.

For more information about the City’s budget, visit minneapolismn.gov/budget.


Public hearing set for Monday, August 3 to establish 38th and Chicago with the commemorative street name “George Perry Floyd Jr. Place”

mock up of george floyd perry sign

Image Description: proposed mock up for the commemorative street sign in honor of Mr. George Perry Floyd Jr.

In collaboration with Ward 9 Council Member Alondra Cano, we have directed staff to bring forward an application to commemoratively rename the intersection of 38th St. and Chicago Ave “George Perry Floyd Jr Place” at the request of the community. This is a small action that we can take now to ensure that the life and tragic death of Mr. George Floyd will never be forgotten.

This application will go before the City’s Planning Commission for an initial public hearing on Monday, Aug. 3rd at 4:30 pm. Upon approval, it will be sent to the Council’s BIZ committee on Tuesday, September 8th and then for a final vote at the Friday, September 18th full City Council meeting. More information will be shared as the application is finalized.


Voters are encouraged to vote by mail this election year; Horn Tower Polling site relocated to Lyndale Community School

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Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is encouraging voting early by mail, and Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services supports this and other CDC and Minneapolis Department of Health recommendations to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballots this election year.

One Ward 8 poll has been relocated

With concerns surrounding coronavirus, several polling sites have been relocated in Minneapolis; either due to a poll being located in a residential building, or due to distancing limitations at a site. The following polling place relocation for Ward 8 is in effect for the Aug. 11 Primary and Nov. 3 General Election:

Ward-Precinct

New Polling Place

8-1

Lyndale Community School, 312 34th St W

MOVED FROM Horn Towers Highrise, 3121 Pillbury Ave

What’s on the ballot?

Minneapolis voters will cast ballots for the following primary races:

  • U.S. senator.
  • United States representative (District 5).
  • School Board member at large.
  • Council member (Ward 6 only).

State law allows voters to bring materials into the polls to help complete their ballots, and the sample ballot is the best tool available for this purpose. By downloading and printing their sample ballots (which are customized to their specific ward and precinct), voters can practice marking their ballots. They can bring this marked-up sample ballot as a reference to the voting booth when completing their official ballots. This is the best way to reduce the time spent waiting in lines.

Find sample ballots for all 134 Minneapolis precincts here: vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/ballot.

To minimize direct contact with others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends voting by mail if possible. All Minnesota residents are eligible to vote early by mail. Should you wish to avoid going to your polling location on Election Day, you can apply now to receive a mail ballot for both August and November. It’s an easy process online or by paper application.

For the online application:  vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail

For a paper application, please call 311 to request a copy.

We recommend you apply for a mail ballot no later than 10 days before Election Day. For the State Primary only, your ballot will count as long as it is postmarked on or before Election Day (August 11) and is received in the mail no later than two days after Election Day (by August 13). This is a change from previous election law requiring mail ballots to be received by Election Day. Please note that if you deliver your ballot in-person to the Elections office, it still must be returned by 3 p.m. on Election Day.

Currently, for the November 3 General Election, your mail ballot will not count if we receive it after Election Day, even if it was postmarked on or before Election Day.

Changes to voting by mail

Any Minnesota voter can vote early; no reason is needed. However, due to a recent court action, some of the requirements for voting by mail have changed. These affect witness requirements and the deadline for returning your ballot. Currently, these changes only apply to the State primary.

  • If you are registered to vote at your current address you will not need a mail ballot witness for the Aug. 11 State primary.
  • If you have moved, changed names or need to register for the first time, you will need a witness to sign your mail ballot envelope.

For the State primary, a voter’s ballot will count as long as it is postmarked on or before the day of the primary (Aug. 11) and is received in the mail no later than two days after the primary (Aug. 13). This is a change from previous election law requiring mail ballots to be received by the day of the primary. Please note that if voters deliver their ballot in-person to the Elections & Voter Services office, it still must be returned by 3 p.m. on the day of the primary.

More information on how to vote by mail is available at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail.

Voting at the Early Vote Center

The Early Vote Center, 980 East Hennepin Ave., makes early in-person voting more convenient for Minneapolis voters. It’s especially helpful to people who need language support or other special accommodations, such as curbside voting. And while we are in a pandemic, voting early can help people avoid lines and crowds at polling places on the day of the election.

The Early Vote Center’s hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday (closed Friday, July 3). The center will also have Saturday hours for the last two weekends before the primary. All early voting hours are posted on the Elections & Voter Services website: vote.minneapolismn.gov/events.

Election judges needed

Election judges are needed for the State primary Aug. 11 to serve voters in local polling places. Election judges are paid $17.15 per hour for their service, which includes training. Depending upon schedule and preferences, people can choose which elections they work in, and whether they want to be at a polling place close to where they live or anywhere else in Minneapolis.

Serving as an election judge provides an opportunity to learn about the election process and is an important service to our community. Judges who are fluent in a second language are especially needed to provide additional language support in the polling place, including Spanish, Somali, Hmong, Oromo, Lao, Vietnamese, Russian and American Sign Language.

Find out more about this opportunity at vote.minneapolismn.gov/judges or call 311.

Voters can save time by taking these three steps

  1. Make sure you’re registered to vote, or pre-register at least 21 days before the election. Voters can register or check the status of their registrations at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/register.
  2. Download and complete the absentee ballot application form in advance, and bring it when you go to vote. Find the request form at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail.
  3. Look at a sample ballot ahead of time; even bring it to refer to when you go to vote. Find your sample ballot at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/ballot.

The City’s 911/MPD Workgroup is seeking input on Non-Emergency Crime and Mental Health Crisis Calls to 911

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In November of 2019, The City Council directed the City Coordinator’s Office to convene a work group comprised of internal City staff and community members to analyze dispatch 911 call categories and determine whether there are opportunities to expand the City’s ability to respond to those calls beyond the Minneapolis Police Department. (Full staff direction can be found on page 4 of this presentation.)

Recommendations from the work group focus on two call areas: 1) Mental Health Crisis calls to 911 and 2) non-emergency report-only calls to 911. Surveys have been created to learn from the experiences of those most impacted and the City is looking for your feedback.

The primary purpose of the surveys is to gain insight from individuals who have experience calling 911 for either a mental health crisis or non-emergency crime calls. A team of residents and staff are redesigning the way calls are handled by the city and they want to hear your perspectives and uplift your voices to make real change in our communities.  Both surveys are open to all and responses are anonymous.

Help redesign the system for reporting non-emergency crimes to the City of Minneapolis

We are looking to hear from residents who have experienced and reported a non-emergency crime.  Such situations include theft, property damage, or parking issues.  Who did you talk to?  Were your needs met?  What was the experience like?

Click here to start the survey now

If you have questions, please email the Office of Performance & Innovation at innovate@minneapolismn.gov

mental health crisis survey

Have you experienced a mental health crisis?

We are looking to hear from residents who have experienced or witnessed a mental health crisis.  Who did you call?  Who showed up?  How were you treated?  Did you feel safe?  Were your needs met?

Click here to start the survey now


City launches a new webpage for the Office of Violence Prevention

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The City of Minneapolis Office of Violence Prevention has a new web presence describing its work within the City’s “transforming public safety” content. The office uses a community-focused public health approach to address the roots of violence, intervene at the first sign of risk, and lead healing in its aftermath.

The Office of Violence Prevention approaches violence prevention with this these things in mind:

  • Violence is not inevitable. As with other health conditions, we can prevent and treat violence, and we can heal from it.
  • Violence has roots in social, economic, political and cultural conditions. These can include:
    • Oppression.
    • Limited economic opportunities.
    • Community disinvestment.
    • Community disconnectedness.
    • Poor housing conditions.
    • Harmful norms around gender and masculinity.
    • Classism.
    • Racism.
  • Violence takes an unequal toll on communities of color and on specific neighborhoods in Minneapolis. Violence prevention must include work to dismantle structural racism.
  • Everyone has a role to play in creating communities that don’t include violence. It takes all of us to make our communities safe, healthy, hopeful and thriving.

Participate and learn more

The Office of Violence Prevention formed in 2018 building on Health Department violence prevention work since 2006. The work has been a national model for other cities across the country.


City reimagining public access television with new vendor BFRESH Productions

bfresh productions

The City is transforming its public access television services. As media consumption has evolved, it has become clear that the City should transition from a public access programming approach to explore new initiatives that support local storytelling and content creation and encourage community engagement.

The City has contracted with BFRESH Productions to reimagine public access television as community media. BFRESH will manage the City’s three public access channels and provide community media services to Minneapolis residents. Community media content will continue to air on Comcast channels 16, 17 and 75 and CenturyLink channels 8007, 8008 and 8009. Community media services and cablecasting will begin in July 2020.

Transitioning from public access to a community media approach will open new doors for public collaboration. This new vision seeks to:

  • Take a multimedia approach to developing, creating and distributing stories and content.
  • Provide the training skills necessary for residents to compete in the current and future workforce.
  • Create additional opportunities to build connections between communities.
  • Provide resources for hyperlocal media organizations to tell their stories.

BFRESH will build on the City’s commitment of promoting a local focus; diversity of voice; and independent, non-commercial media content created for and by the people of Minneapolis. BFRESH will provide community media services such as training, access to production equipment, space and provide and manage free airtime on the City’s public access channels. Programming for the channels will consist of community-produced TV shows, shorts, films and other hyperlocal storytelling content.

About BFRESH Productions 

BFRESH Productions is a media production and communications agency based in north Minneapolis. The collective experience of its diverse, multi-generational team spans broadcast, media training, journalism, program management, data insight, technology and public access television.

Share your feedback

BFRESH invites the community to provide feedback by taking a survey as BFRESH gathers data and opportunities to best serve Minneapolis residents. Ideas for content and partnerships in the evolving community media access model are encouraged. BFRESH will also host several virtual conversations in July and August for residents to help shape the future of community media in Minneapolis.

To contact BFRESH Productions, email info@bfreshproductions.com.


Pay-what-you-can trainings provided by the MN Peacebuilding Leadership Institute

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Introduction to Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience for Cultural Competence – 2 hour online training

When terrible things happen, like COVID-19, racism, police brutality, our peace is stolen from us. Most people want to build peace back into their lives and community. These 2-hour online trainings are partially funded by the City of Minneapolis’ Office of Violence Prevention to promote racial trauma healing, resilience, and restorative justice for all who live, work, and/or play in Minneapolis. Pay-what-you-can up to $30

Click the date/time link to register:

This 2-hour online training teaches basic concepts, models, and strategies of the 5-day Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience – STAR Training. STAR is a research and practice-supported community education training integrating neuropsychology, trauma healing and resilience, restorative justice, nonviolent conflict transformation, and broadly defined spirituality for increasing cultural competence. All are welcome to join us. Space is limited to 30.

Minnesota social workers, teachers, and nurses can earn 2 hours of continuing education for $45. These trainings are in high demand. Register early. Sponsored by Minnesota Peacebuilding Leadership Institute.

Online STAR-Lite Training: Learning Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience in a Single Day for Cultural Competence – 8-hour online training

This training is being partially grant-funded by the Engelsma Family Foundation for those who live, work, and/or play in Minneapolis. Pay-what-you-can-up-to $40.

Click here for details and to register:

Wednesday, July 22, 2020, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. CST

STAR-Lite is a single-day, evidence-based online training integrating neuropsychology, trauma healing and resilience, restorative justice, nonviolent conflict transformation, and broadly defined spirituality. STAR-Lite is for professionals, paraprofessionals, and laypeople. All are welcome to join us. This training is partially funded by the Engelsma Family Foundation. Space is limited to 60. Optional 6.5 CEs and 5.5 CLEs available for an additional $35. Please register as soon as possible and at least by 9am the day before the training.

Free Monthly Racial Healing Circle: Coming to the Table

Join Peacebuilding Assistant Executive Director and CTTT facilitator Crixell Shell and others invested in transforming racialized trauma into nonviolent power with positive productive alternatives to revenge to make Minneapolis a peacebuilding power city for all. 20 people maximum per circle.

Register for these free monthly online talking circles at: https://www.mnpeace.org/events.html

Introduction to Restorative Justice for Community Healing and Transformation   2-hour online training

Relationships are ruptured by harm and violence. Restorative justice heals and repairs individual and community relationships to prevent violence.
Pay-What-You-Can-Up to $50. This training is for everyone who wants to learn the basics of Restorative Justice.
Details and registration:  
Friday, July 24, 2020, 10am – 12noon

Training objectives:
1. Learn the basic Restorative Justice philosophy, principles, and practices.
2. Learn the differences between Restorative Justice and other types of justice.
3. Discuss how to apply Restorative Justice concepts through a trauma-informed lens for community healing and transformation.


“20 is Plenty” speed limit yard signs available at Minneapolis fire stations

Minneapolis and Saint Paul are in the process of implementing new, lower speed limits to support safer streets. Slower speeds on local streets make travel safer for everyone no matter how you get around.

The new speed limit starting this fall will be 20 mph in both cities unless otherwise signed. To help get out the word about the new speed limits and the importance of slower speeds for safety, the City has yard signs available for community members.

You can pick up your “20 is Plenty” yard sign at any Minneapolis fire station. Signs will be available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Fridays through July 24 while supplies last. Due to COVID-19, signs will be available outside the stations for no-contact pickup. Signs come with metal stands. Find your nearest fire station here.

You can learn more about new speed limits here.

twenty is plently sign


Everyone can work to reduce the spread of COVID-19

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We’re working hard to slow the spread of the coronavirus to save lives. Social exposures and contacts are increasing as more places open back up, and young adults now account for more than 50% of cases.

  • Wear masks when in public. 10-50% of virus carriers are asymptomatic, so they don’t even know they’re sick. Wearing masks helps control the virus and has been shown to lower COVID-19 spread.
  • Avoid enclosed spaces with groups of people, where the virus can linger in the air for long periods of time.
  • Get tested if you have cold or flu-like symptomsFind testing locations.
  • Stay 6 feet away from others.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or sleeve, or a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands afterwards.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom or before eating. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face – especially your eyes, nose and mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Do not go to “COVID parties” – Young adults face a real risk of significant illness and complications. They can also pass the virus along to family members and other people in the community.

Donate homemade face masks at Minneapolis fire stations for Mask Drive Mondays

Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday for Mask Drive Mondays. The City’s Health Department continues to get requests from the community for help securing masks and the donations make a big difference in meeting those needs.


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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Mpls Health Dept. Office of Violence Prevention funded trauma healing, resilience, and restorative justice trainings

Dear Field Regina, Northrup neighborhood,

I hope you are safe, healthy, and well.

Below are the online July trainings and racial healing talking circles that have been funded by the City of Mpls Office of Violence Prevention and the Engelsma Family Foundation.  Anything you can do to get this information out to the residents in your neighborhood will be terrific.

Introduction to Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience for Cultural Competence – 2 hour online training

When terrible things happen, like COVID-19, racism, police brutality, our peace is stolen from us.

Most people want to build peace back into their lives and community.
These 2-hour online trainings are partially funded by the City of Minneapolis’ Office of Violence Prevention to promote racial trauma healing, resilience, and restorative justice for all who live, work, and/or play in Minneapolis.
Pay-what-you-can up to $30
Click the date/time link to register:

Tuesday, July 14, 2020, 2pm – 4pm CST                          Friday, July 17, 2020, 10am – 12pm CST
Tuesday, July 21, 2020, 2pm – 4pm CST                          Thursday, July 23, 2020, 10am – 12pm CST
Tuesday, July 28, 2020, 2pm – 4pm CST                          Friday, July 31, 2020, 10am – 12pm CST

This 2-hour online training teaches basic concepts, models, and strategies of the 5-day Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience – STAR Training. STAR is a research and practice-supported community education training integrating neuropsychology, trauma healing and resilience, restorative justice, nonviolent conflict transformation, and broadly defined spirituality for increasing cultural competence. All are welcome to join us. Space is limited to 30. This training is for everyone: laypeople, paraprofessionals, and licensed professionals. This training is not only for “staff.”
Training objectives:

1. Learn and reflect on the various types of trauma and common responses to psychological trauma for increased racial healing and equity.
2. Learn and reflect on the links between unhealed trauma and cycles of harm and violence experienced by all people.
3. Learn and reflect on the basic STAR trauma healing and resilience models and associated practices for increased racial healing and equity.
4. Explore ways to apply trauma healing, resilience, and restorative justice practices toward building peace within your sphere of influence.

Minnesota social workers, teachers, and nurses can earn 2 hours of continuing education for $45. These trainings are in high demand. Register early. Sponsored by Minnesota Peacebuilding Leadership Institutehttp://mnpeace.org/

Quotes from Intro to STAR trainees:
“Thank you so much for this wonderful opportunity! It was an excellent balance of valuable information and critical reflection, and it was so nice to be able to connect in smaller groups.  Kudos on a great training!”
“This training gave me hope, helped me feel energized to have new information but also to know many others are interested in this content and applying it to their lives and work. Thank you for taking the financial risk to offer these no/low cost trainings. Very well done, thorough and clearly presented high level overview of extremely complex topics. I will definitely share with others what I have gained, and I hope and pray that your work will be blessed and multiplied at this difficult time in history. Thank you!”  

Online STAR-Lite Training: Learning Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience in a Single Day for Cultural Competence – 8-hour online training

This training is being partially grant-funded by the Engelsma Family Foundation for those who live, work, and/or play in Minneapolis. 

Click here for details and to register: Wednesday, July 22, 2020, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. CST
Pay-what-you-can-up-to $40.
STAR-Lite is a single-day, evidence-based online training integrating neuropsychology, trauma healing and resilience, restorative justice, nonviolent conflict transformation, and broadly defined spirituality. STAR-Lite is for professionals, paraprofessionals, and laypeople. All are welcome to join us. This training is partially funded by the Engelsma Family Foundation. Space is limited to 60. Optional 6.5 CEs and 5.5 CLEs available for an additional $35. Please register as soon as possible and at least by 9am the day before the training.

Coming to the Table (CTTT) are free, monthly racial healing talking circles to address interpersonal, community, and structural racial harm, violence, and trauma. At CTTT, descendants of those who were enslaved, descendants of slave owners, Indigenous community members, and all those interested in engaging in safe constructive dialogue are invited to come together to envision Minneapolis as a just and truthful community – one that acknowledges and seeks to heal the racial wounds from the historical trauma of slavery, genocide of Native Americans, and the racism these collective traumas continue to spawn. CTTT provides ongoing relationship engagement, leadership, resources, and a supportive environment to dismantle racism. Join Peacebuilding Assistant Executive Director and CTTT facilitator Crixell Shell and others invested in transforming racialized trauma into nonviolent power with positive productive alternatives to revenge to make Minneapolis a peacebuilding power city for all. 20 people maximum per circle. Register for these free monthly online talking circles at: https://www.mnpeace.org/events.html

We are grateful to the Engelsma Family Foundation for funding our CTTT Minneapolis talking circles in 2020.

The following online trainings do not have grant funding. Nonetheless, they are open to all who wish to attend:

Introduction to Restorative Justice for Community Healing and Transformation  2-hour online training
Relationships are ruptured by harm and violence. Restorative justice heals and repairs individual and community relationships to prevent violence.
Pay-What-You-Can-Up to $50   This training is for everyone who wants to learn the basics of Restorative Justice.

Details and registration are at these links:
Friday, July 10, 2020, 10am – 12noon
Friday, July 24, 2020, 10am – 12noon
Training objectives:
1. Learn the basic Restorative Justice philosophy, principles, and practices.
2. Learn the differences between Restorative Justice and other types of justice.
3. Discuss how to apply Restorative Justice concepts through a trauma-informed lens for community healing and transformation.

Resilience and Self-Care: Training for Practice in Everyday Life   2-hour online training
When terrible things happen and our peace is stolen from us, most people want to build peace back into our lives.
Join us to learn, explore, and apply strategies to build peace into our personal and community lives with self-care practices for resilience.
Details and registration here:  Friday, July 10, 2020, 2pm – 4pm
This training is for everyone.   Pay-What-You-Can-Up to $50
Training objectives:
1. Learn the definitions and purpose of resilience and self-care
2. Learn Resilience and self -are research and how it applies to everyday life.
3. Learn strategies for self-care to build resilience
4. Consider how to apply strategies self-care for resilience in everyday life.

If you’d like digital images for each of these events, please let me know and I will send them to you.

Thank you for your leadership!

Together, transforming our communities peace by peace,

Donna L. Minter, PhD, LP
she/her/hers
Founder and Executive Director

Minnesota Peacebuilding Leadership Institute
5200 47th Avenue S., Ste. 101
Minneapolis, MN 55417

612-345-4310

www.mnpeace.org

Click to Support our Racial and Economic Equity Trainee Scholarship Recipients

The Minnesota Peacebuilding Leadership Institute (“Peacebuilding”) is a 501(c)(3) non-partisan public charity nonprofit organization transforming psychological trauma into nonviolent power with positive productive alternatives to revenge. We prepare individuals, organizations, and communities for truth-telling and repairing harm for healed, just relationships toward the possibility of reconciliation.

Our mission is to instigate, train, and support racially, sexually, culturally, ethnically, religiously, and economically diverse individuals and organizations to become trauma-informed, resilience-oriented, and restorative justice-focused, empowering communities in Minnesota, the USA, and around the world. Our vision is making Minnesota the peacebuilding power state for all. 

Jeremy Schroeder Ward 11 Update

Ward 11 Neighbors,

I thank you again for your ongoing engagement with me and with the City as we tackle some of the biggest challenges in modern memory. I hope this newsletter is a helpful continuation of this communication. You are always welcome to get in touch with me about issues that matter to you. If you have immediate questions about City services like garbage pick-up, potholes, parking violations, and more, please call 311 or use the online reporting tool for the most efficient service.


Community Safety Updates

As we come up on the one-month anniversary of George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis Police, it’s a good time for us to pause and reflect on where we stand in terms of public safety in our community. The violence of the past weekend shows us clearly that we need transformative change to ensure safety for everybody in every part of Minneapolis. Shooting deaths and injuries indicate the need for interventions to prevent gun violence. Police response alone can’t do that – I agree with MPD Chief Medaria Arradondo when he says this is a public health crisis that will require more than policing.

Our existing system is not working for anyone. A large majority of Ward 11 residents contacting me say they want a better public safety system. And even more commonly than that, I’m hearing from neighbors who say they don’t want their tax dollars funding a system that does not work. Together, we need to focus on what will actually keep neighborhoods safe. That is the conversation — based on data, community input, and ongoing analysis — I am committed to having. In fact, that is exactly the work outlined in a resolution that the City Council unanimously passed earlier this month.

Law enforcement requires the community’s trust and partnership, and it’s clear the MPD has lost that trust. While the MPD continues to respond to emergencies as we imagine a better future for public safety in our city, I am committed to doing everything I can to hold officers accountable for meeting the highest standard of public service and respect during this time of transition. I am limited by the City Charter, which grants sole operational oversight of the MPD to the Mayor and not the City Council, but I will not accept mistreatment of community members by officers.

I recognize the many, many neighbors who no longer feel safe calling the police as well as the folks who never felt safe doing so in the first place. I pledge to work in close partnership with our community, my elected colleagues, Chief Arradondo, and anyone else who wishes to contribute to this effort to build a more equitable, trustworthy, and just approach to public safety.

Proposed Charter Amendment

At this Friday’s City Council meeting, several of my colleagues are scheduled to introduce proposed ballot language that would amend the City Charter – which is essentially our constitution – to create a Department of Community Safety. Under their proposal, voters would be able to decide this November whether this is their preferred path forward for Minneapolis. In general, I am supportive of exploring a ballot measure so that voters can directly decide on this issue. But that won’t be the only time folks can offer their input. Before that, the proposed language would need to follow a Charter amendment process that includes a public hearing as well as consideration by the City’s appointed Charter Commission. There is much discussion to come on this important proposal.

Virtual Community Conversation – June 30

I will host another virtual Community Conversation on public safety next Tuesday, June 30 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. In keeping with guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic, this meeting will take place via Skype. All Ward 11 community members are welcome to join online or by phone to hear more about my vision and the work already underway to improve public safety in Minneapolis. In the interest of keeping this conversation as constructive and productive as possible, I will be taking questions via email and answering them on the call. If there are specific questions or public safety topics you would like to discuss, please share them with me via email at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov. You can send them in advance of Wednesday’s event or during it. We’ll get through as many questions as we can during our time together. You will be able to access the meeting through this link or by calling 612-276-6670 and entering the passcode 302717218#.


2020 Budget Modifications to Address Shortfall

A significant revenue shortfall due to COVID-19 economic fallout requires the City to pursue an unorthodox midyear budget process to trim costs this year. The City Council on Friday will consider formal administrative approval of a series of cost-containment measures including a hiring freeze and wage freeze, a pause on major planned purchases, and a 15% cut in contractual and professional services. At the same time, many City employees are considering taking voluntary unpaid leave to help stave off permanent layoffs. This slate of cost reductions would get us part of the way there, but we will have difficult decisions to make about further cuts in coming weeks.

Mayor Jacob Frey will brief the City Council on proposed cuts to this year’s budget on July 9 and staff will present their proposed revisions on July 10. Community members will be able to share feedback at a pair of virtual public hearings:

  • Tuesday, July 14 at 6:05 p.m.
  • Wednesday, July 22 at 10 a.m.

The City Council is scheduled to vote July 24 on the revised 2020 budget. I look forward to hearing from Ward 11 residents during opportunities for public engagement next month. Find more information about the City’s budget here.


Caring for Our Unsheltered Neighbors

Amid COVID-19, economic hardship, and a longstanding housing shortage, there are a number of encampments in Minneapolis – most notably in Powderhorn Park, where Park Board officials agreed to allow folks to stay for the near term.

The City continues to work with multijurisdictional partners, including Hennepin County and the state, to address unsheltered homelessness. The City is currently working with its government and outreach partners to ensure the health of folks living in the Powderhorn Park encampment, including by providing hand-washing stations as well as education on social distancing. I receive regular updates from City staff on their ongoing work. This week, they will convene partners to coordinate provision of health services at Powderhorn Park.

Partners continue to prioritize finding housing for as many folks as possible, as quickly as possible. Earlier in the pandemic, the City worked in coordination with Hennepin County to move high-risk folks from more crowded shelters to hotels. It’s critical we do the most we can with the limited resources we have. Staff are developing short-, medium-, and long-term solutions now, in partnership with various entities and community leaders (including folks who have experienced homelessness). We will not have an adequate solution until everyone in our community has safe, stable, affordable housing.


Please Continue to Cover Your Face

As we continue to see COVID-19 cases in Minneapolis, it remains important that everyone in Minneapolis abide by our emergency regulation requiring folks to wear cloth masks or face coverings when they are in an indoor place of public accommodation including retail shops and grocery stores. Data show COVID-19 may have a high rate of transmission through respiratory droplets, particularly indoors, and that wearing a mask can reduce the risk of community spread. People who do not show signs of the virus can still spread it to others.

Businesses are not required to provide masks to customers or employees, but employers are required to mandate the use of masks by their staff. To report noncompliance, call 311 or use the online reporting tool.

Finally, folks can help ensure everyone can stay safe by donating homemade masks. All Minneapolis fire stations accept masks every Monday between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. for distribution to those most in need, including food shelves, congregate living facilities, small corner stores, and shelters. Please keep six feet between yourself and others when you drop off masks, and note that our fire stations are not equipped to take other donations at this time.


State Emergency Extended, Evictions Still Suspended

As a reflection of the ongoing crisis posed by COVID-19, Governor Tim Walz extended Minnesota’s peacetime emergency through July 13. This action extends protections for Minnesotans, including a prohibition on evictions and wage garnishment. To be clear, landlords are not allowed to evict tenants unless the tenant seriously endangers the safety of other residents or others on the premises. This means households will be able to remain sheltered in place during this peacetime emergency, a critical safeguard for families that protects our collective health and wellbeing. Tenants are still required to pay rent during the eviction moratorium.

By extending the peacetime emergency, the state continues its capability to procure personal protective equipment (PPE) on an expedited basis and allows for strategic reopening of businesses and other facilities in alignment with guidance from public health experts. Every other state in the country has declared a state of emergency allowing governors and other officials to quickly respond to rapidly evolving threats stemming from COVID-19. Read the executive order extending the peacetime emergency here.


Rent Assistance Still Available from Hennepin County

Even though there is a temporary hold on evictions in Minnesota, rent is still due. Hennepin County continues to offer assistance to residents in need that can be used to cover this month’s rent or past-due rent from previous months. To qualify you must:

  • Rent anywhere in Hennepin County.
  • Have had household income below 50% of the area median income (about $46,550 for a three-person household) before COVID-19.
  • Lost income due to COVID-19 that has not been replaced by unemployment insurance or other emergency assistance.
  • Can’t afford housing costs this month.
  • Not currently receive Section 8 or other rental assistance.

Priority will be given to households with the lowest incomes and those not eligible for unemployment insurance. Learn more and apply for assistance here. If you do not have internet access or cannot complete the form in English call 612-302-3160.


Small Business Relief Grants Available Now

A new small business relief program signed into law last week is now accepting applications. Small businesses owned and operated by Minnesotans facing financial hardship due to COVID-19 can apply for grants worth $10,000 to support payroll expenses, rent or mortgage payments, utility bills, and other similar expenses. Find more information on the program and apply here. Submit your materials by 5 p.m. on Thursday, July 2 to be considered. A total of $60.3 million is available for grant awards. A randomized, computer-generated lottery will be used to select businesses statewide to receive grants.


Food Assistance for Minneapolis Youth

Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) recently adjusted its summer schedule for food box pick-up – including opening new sites and closing sites located near others – and continues to offer Minneapolis families a free food box each week for each child age 18 and younger. Boxes include fresh produce and items for seven breakfasts and seven lunches that meet the district’s nutrition guidelines. All children, not just MPS students, are eligible for free boxes. Find more information on the program, including the latest pick-up locations and schedule details, here.

In addition, families with children who received free or reduced-price school meals in the 2019-2020 school year are eligible for a one-time $325 payment to help offset food costs through the Pandemic Emergency Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) program. Families who were receiving assistance through the state’s SNAP and/or MFIP programs should have received this payment in late May, but families who were not already receiving SNAP or MFIP benefits as of March 18 must complete this application by next Tuesday, June 30. Children may continue to receive prepacked food boxes from MPS and food from other community locations even if they receive P-EBT benefits.


46th Street Ramp to Northbound 35W to Close

Starting at 10 p.m. tonight – Tuesday, June 23 – the ramp from 46th Street onto northbound 35W will close through September 2021 to accommodate the 35W reconstruction project. Minneapolis Public Works staff continues to be in frequent contact with the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT), which is responsible for this project, to ensure everything possible is done to limit disruptions to Minneapolis residents and businesses. The City was able to advocate for much more limited closures than initially planned for the southbound ramp at 46th Street by helping to reconfigure project plans to preserve access. Unfortunately, on the northbound side, similar accommodates are not possible because the northbound ramp will lead directly into construction and there is no room for drivers to safely merge onto the highway. This will be challenging, but overall it’s encouraging that MnDOT crews – with the support of our Public Works staff – have been able to move more quickly through many aspects of this project than initially expected. I am hopeful that they’ll be able to be as efficient as possible with this work too, recognizing the impact to our community.

Any questions or input about the 35W reconstruction project can be directed to MnDOT project staff at info@35w94.com or 612-284-6125. You can find more information on MnDOT’s project website as well.


City Offering Pet Vaccines

Many residents have grown to rely on the Minneapolis Animal Care and Control (MACC)’s annual vaccination clinics. Due to COVID-19, MACC was unable to hold two clinics this spring and has heard from pet owners about difficulties in getting their animals vaccinated at private clinics following closures and lack of appointments. Beginning the week of July 6, MACC will implement a new pilot program to provide clinic services by appointment only at the Minneapolis Animal Shelter (212 17 Ave N).

This service is open to Minneapolis residents only. Folks will need to show or purchase a current pet license. MACC will offer the following services:

  • Rabies vaccine for $20 (animals with prior proof of current rabies vaccination will be given a three-year rabies vaccine; all others will be provided a one-year vaccine)
  • Da2PP or PRC vaccine for $25
  • Microchip for $35

Appointments are available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. In order to maintain the health and safety of our staff and residents by ensuring social distancing, MACC cannot accommodate unscheduled appointments. Residents can sign up for services here or by calling 311. Getting animals vaccinated is an important public health and safety service, and MACC is doing its part to help the community during these difficult times.


State Seeking Input on Distance Learning

The Minnesota Department of Education wants to hear from families about their distance learning experience this spring to help state officials plan for the 2020-21 school year. You can share your input and suggestions through this survey. The Department of Education continues to partner with the Minnesota Department of Health to address the COVID-19 pandemic and determine how to keep students, families, and staff healthy. So far, state agencies have imagined three possible scenarios for school this fall: in-person learning for all students, hybrid learning with strict social distancing and capacity limits, and distance learning only. Learn more about the state’s ongoing work here. State officials expect to announce a decision on how schools can operate in the coming school year by the week of July 27. This is not a City decision. To stay in the loop, you can sign up for email updates related to schools and the state’s COVID-19 response.


Park Board Expands Lifeguard Services

The Park Board announced plans to expand lifeguard staffing from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday at the three most-visited beaches in the park system, including Lake Nokomis Main Beach along with Bde Maka Ska Thomas Beach and Wirth Lake Beach. The Park Board plans to hire additional lifeguards to offer daily service by Thursday, July 7 at Lake Nokomis Main Beach and several others. Learn more about these revised safety plans here. All beach visitors are encouraged to social distance and bring a water bottle as well as hand sanitizer.

Earlier, the Park Board had announced beaches would not have lifeguards this summer as part of changes made due to COVID-19. The pandemic impacted the hiring process and training for lifeguards. To address the need for lifeguards while recognizing hiring challenges, the Park Board now plans to hire lifeguards previously employed in our park system who are already certified and provide them in-person training over the coming weeks.


Stay Updated on City Business

I’m pleased to see such an outpouring of interest in City policymaking processes, and I invite you to stay in the loop about meetings, public hearings, and more. The City’s Legislative Information Management System – or LIMS for short – includes a searchable database and calendar with up-to-date City Council agendas, official actions, and more. It’s also a great resource to find out about upcoming public hearings and public meetings related to the City Council and the City’s many appointed boards and commissions. If you’re interested in City business, I encourage you to keep an eye on LIMS and subscribe to email updates on committees and topics that interest you.

You can tune into City Council meetings (and select others) live via City Council TV, or they are also broadcast on Comcast channels 14 and 799 and CenturyLink channels 8001 or 8501. Access archived broadcast recordings for on-demand replays via the City’s YouTube page


Wash your hands and cover your face!

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

Join us on Thursday, 6/25 for a Community Call regarding the George Floyd Memorial

CM Andrea Jenkins

612.673.2208

andrea.jenkins@MinneapolisMN.gov

Office Hours: Monday 9-11 a.m.

Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St.

Join us on Thursday, 6/25 for a Community Call regarding the George Floyd Memorial from 4 pm – 5:30 pm

George Floyd Memorial "fist" Statue

Photo Credit: the New York Times

Join your neighbors, neighborhood organization leaders, and local elected officials for an online community call about the George Floyd Memorial this Thursday, June 25th at 4 pm. Since the death of Mr. Floyd this past Memorial Day, our community has been mourning and honoring the life of George Floyd by curating a beautiful memorial in his honor at the intersection of 38th and Chicago. Many people across the city and state have come to visit the memorial site to pay respects.

While there have been growing concerns raised about livability and safety issues arising in the night, there is much interest in beginning this conversation about the short-term preservation and long-term plans of a George Floyd monument with community at the table. We wish to hold this conversation with community members to better understand the many conversations currently happening in the community about these efforts and how we can move forward with a process that aligns with, and is informed by, the surrounding community.

When: Thursday, June 25th from 4 pm to 5:30 pm

How to Participate: Join this Virtual event on Thursday, June 25th at 4 pm via Microsoft Teams using the instructions below. You can join online or by phone.

Join Microsoft Teams Meeting

Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_MDQzYzQzZTItM2I5ZS00YTJlLTkwNjgtMjBmYzZkNWE1ZGVi%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%220bfb3f5a-e8ea-4d54-b021-2b2f910c715f%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22cba4738a-6221-4fda-8c61-e66ee2987599%22%7d

Join by phone: +1 612-276-6670   Conference ID: 178 376 421#

You can also access information for this call on the Ward 8 Facebook Page here


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

CM Andrea Jenkins

612.673.2208

andrea.jenkins@MinneapolisMN.gov

Office Hours: Monday 9-11 a.m.

Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St.

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Hello Neighbors,

I want to begin by acknowledging the pain and frustrations that we all are experiencing in these extraordinary times. Our beloved community has become the epicenter of the protests that have developed into an international movement. Much of the activity, especially during the day, has been somber, peaceful and respectful. After dark, however, the site has become something different. There are reports of gunshots, drug use, illegal alcohol service to minors and numerous mental health concerns.

In short, the activities are becoming a public health and community safety issue. It will require all of us to come together and restore our neighborhood livability while honoring the memory, history and the humanity of George Floyd. We are set to rename the intersection “George Perry Floyd Place.” I have been in communication with our U.S. Senators, Congresswoman Omar, our State Representatives and Senators, County Commissioner Conley and many staff members from the City of Minneapolis who are poised to help create a permanent memorial or monument that reflects the Floyd family and wishes of this community.

As many of you know at the beginning of my term, I prioritized the re-imagining of East 38th Street as my number one goal while in office. That goal has not changed. We must create a community that is safe and welcoming for everyone. I will be working with all of the powers that be, to begin the process of peacefully re-opening the intersection while preserving a sacred memorial. This means having open communication with all those who are there overnight, the neighbors like yourselves, as well as other like-minded stakeholders about what is the best approach to accomplish this.

Friends, we are at a historic moment – a time when we must think beyond our own comfort levels and work towards solutions that recognize the humanity in all of us. I am ready to stand shoulder to shoulder with you to make that happen. In the coming days, I will be hosting a community meeting to begin this process. We will ensure these conversations accommodate for physical distancing, and collectively, we provide an environment that is welcoming for all.

Thank you for your patience, your resolve, and your commitment to true definition of community. As we grapple with these very challenging issues, please know that I am advocating and working on your behalf.

e signature image

Check out the 6/18 Star Tribune Op-Ed article on Funding a Racially Equitable Transportation System


Today, June 19 is Juneteenth – we honor and recognize the significance of this historic emancipation day for Black Americans

Juneteenth Freedom Day Banner

image from Atlanta Intown Paper

Happy Juneteenth! I hope everyone finds time today to reflect on the significance and embrace all that this day means for Black people and for this country as a whole.

The history of Juneteenth:

On June 19th, 1865, two years 6 months and 18 days after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation into law, Union troops rode into Galveston, Texas to inform the last enslaved African Americans in the United States of their freedom. Juneteenth commemorates the official end of slavery in America and although it has been recognized as an official state holiday since 1980, due to the current focus on racial injustice in America, it is now receiving wide spread acknowledgement as a paid holiday for many large corporations. Across the country, many communities celebrate freedom on both Juneteenth (June 19th) as well as January 1st, in honor of the Emancipation Proclamation.

“Juneteenth is a time to recommit ourselves to the work that remains undone. We remember that even in the darkest hours, there is cause to hope for tomorrow’s light. Today, no matter our race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation, we recommit ourselves to working to free modern-day slaves around the world and to honoring in our time the efforts of those who fought so hard to steer our country truer to our highest ideals.” -President Barack Obama, 2016

Census & Juneteenth events:

The City of Minneapolis believes that our African American communities should be counted in the 2020 Census so that they receive the adequate political representation as well as the proper resources to meet their needs. The census will have a presence at the following events commemorating Juneteenth in Minneapolis:

  • Friday June 19th – Unite & Rebuild www.uniteandrebuildmsp.org, 3pm-8pm, 2500 E Lake St, Minneapolis, MN 55406
  • Friday June 19th  –  Community Festival and Rally, 12pm-6pm, Cub Foods Parking lot 701 W Broadway Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55411
  • Saturday June 20th –The Staff of Freedom Works is hosting an event and BBQ, beginning at noon, located at the St Olaf Church downtown: 215 S 8th St Minneapolis, MN 55402

Celebrating two major Supreme Court Victories this week

This has been a significant week for national protections for some of our most marginalized communities. On June 15th, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of national protections against workplace discrimination for LGBTQ people. Read more here and review the ruling here.

On June 18, the United States Supreme Court issued a decision saying that the way in which the Department of Homeland Security ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program violated the Administrative Procedures Act. While the federal government retains the power to end the program, the Supreme Court ruled that the way the program was ended was unlawful. More information about the DACA decision can be found here. Stay updated on this important issue by visiting the City of Minneapolis’ Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs webpage at www.minneapolismn.gov/ncr/oira/.


POSTPONED: Community input session on the Draft 38th St. Thrive! Cultural District & Strategic Development Plan

38th st thrive banner

If you live or work along the E 38th Street Corridor, you may be familiar with or have heard about the 38th St. Thrive! project from your neighbors, friends, or colleagues that my office has been working on since the beginning of 2019. For over a year now the Ward 8 office, with support from the City’s Community Planning and Economic Development (CPED) department and with the incredible dedication of community leaders from our neighborhood organizations, cultural centers, community organizations, and businesses, have worked to co-create a comprehensive strategic planning document that centers the community’s vision for the future of the 38th Street Corridor and our shared community.

Due to the current circumstances and needs at the intersection of 38th St. and Chicago we have decided that now is not the time to move forward with this engagement session until stability and safety of the intersection is restored and plans for engagement around a permanent memorial to honor the life of George Perry Floyd have been drafted.

Background on the 38th St. Thrive Project

In 2015, the community held a series of meetings titled “The Future of East 38th Street,” hosted by then Ward 8 Council Member Elizabeth Glidden. Those meetings led to the generation of several ideas, priorities and recommendations from community members.

In February 2019, Ward 8 Council VP Andrea Jenkins reconvened community members to co-create a strategic development plan by the residents, business owners, and neighborhood organizations in the E 38th Street community, in collaboration with the City of Minneapolis’ Department of Community Planning and Economic Development.

In March 2019, a smaller planning committee was formed with community members who expressed interest in driving the planning process from the initial February event, to conduct community engagement and to draft a proposed plan together to share with the larger community.

This planning committee met five times to craft the district’s vision, assets, and strategies based on priorities identified by the broader 38th Street community and a draft plan has been developed to share with you all.

At a future virtual community meeting you can expect to:


Free COVID-19 testing available in critical neighborhoods Tuesday, June 23 and Wednesday, June 24

stay safe mn

The State has added special COVID-19 testing sites for critical communities for people who have recently been a part of large gatherings whether or not they have symptoms. Make sure to preregister for a time slot if you can before heading over to be sure you have a spot. Appointments have been filling up fast. People who arrive without an appointment might have to come back later or another day. Appointments for the next week will open up on Wednesdays, so if you don’t find anything available, keep checking back.

The Minnesota Department of Health recommends that any Minnesotan who has attended a protest, vigil or community cleanup get tested for COVID-19, which can spread easily and quickly in large groups of people who are close together for long periods of time. Even people who do not have symptoms can still spread the virus to others.

Residents who live in the area of these three outdoor sites who have recently been a part of large gatherings are invited to preregister for free COVID-19 testing:

  • Holy Trinity Church (pedestrians) 2730 E. 31st St.
  • Sabathani Community Center (drive up, limited pedestrians) 310 E. 38th St.
  • New Salem Baptist Church (pedestrians) 2507 Bryant Ave. N.

Preregister

Make sure to preregister for a time slot if possible before heading over to be sure you have a spot. Appointments have been filling up fast. People who arrive without an appointment might have to come back later or another day. Appointments for the next week will open up on Wednesdays. People who join the waiting list will be notified when slots open up.

The registration form is in English, Spanish, Somali and Hmong. Spanish, Somali and Hmong interpreters will be onsite. Interpreting for other languages will be available by phone.

Preregister for a time slot and find more information online here or by phone at 1-800-657-3903 if you don’t have internet access or need interpreting.

Testing for other communities

If you do not live in the neighborhood of one of these three new sites, use this directory to find a testing location near you.

Note: Once you’ve been tested for COVID-19, it’s important to self-isolate until you receive your test results to avoid infecting others in case you test positive. If your test is positive, the Minnesota Department of Health recommends staying home for at least 10 days and until you have three days fever-free without using fever reducing meds.


Hennepin County offering Rental Assistance Funds

hennepin county logo

Hennepin County has up to $15 million available to help low-income renters who can’t afford their housing costs this month due to COVID-19. Even though there is a temporary hold on evictions, rent is still due.

Folks may qualify for emergency assistance if they:

  • Rent anywhere in Hennepin County.
  • Had household income below 50% of the area median income (about $46,550 for a three-person household) before COVID-19.
  • Lost income due to COVID-19 that has not been replaced by unemployment insurance or other emergency assistance.
  • Can’t afford housing costs this month.
  • Are not currently receiving Section 8 or other rental assistance.

There is no deadline to apply. Priority will be given to households with the lowest incomes and those not eligible for unemployment insurance.

Apply

Learn more and apply for assistance.

If you do not have internet access or cannot complete the form in English call 612-302-3160.


State executive order suspending evictions extended until July 13

governor walz header image

The governor’s latest extension of the peacetime emergency means that the suspension of evictions and landlord-initiated lease terminations remains in place until July 13.

This suspension will allow households to remain sheltered during the peacetime emergency. The executive order does not relieve a tenant’s obligation to pay rent.

It also does not include eviction actions based on cases where the tenant seriously endangers the safety of residents, or where the tenant seriously endangers the safety of others on the premises. Read more about this exception.


35W@94 Downtown to Crosstown Constructions Updates

mndot logo

Lake Street closure June 22-23

Now that the new bridge deck has had time to cure, crews will need to remove the temporary support structures from around the new northbound I-35W bridge deck over Lake St. To do this safely, crews will close Lake St. between Stevens Ave. and 2nd Ave. on Mon, June 22 and Tue, June 23 from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists will be detoured to use 31st St.

I-35W overnight closures June 22-24

As reconstruction work continues on I-35W, a traffic shift is needed. To complete the traffic shift, there will be upcoming overnight closures of I-35W between I-94 and Hwy 62.

  • Southbound I-35W will be closed from 10 p.m. Mon, June 22 through 5 a.m. Tue, June 23
  • Northbound I-35W will be closed from 10 p.m. Tue, June 23 through 5 a.m. Wed, June 24

Additional overnight closures may be needed later in the week.

46th Street to northbound I-35W ramp closure begins June 23

Beginning at 10 p.m. Tue, June 23, the ramp from 46th St. to northbound I-35W will close. Motorists will be able to get on northbound I-35W using Diamond Lake Rd. This closure is needed as crews begin reconstruction work on the northbound I-35W lanes. The ramp will remain closed through September 2021.

The southbound I-35W ramps to/from 46th St. and the ramp from northbound I-35W to 46th St. will remain open.

Northbound I-35W to 36th Street ramp closure begins June 23

In addition to the 46th St. to northbound I-35W ramp closure, the ramp from northbound I-35W to 36th St. will also close at 10 p.m. on Tue, June 23. This closure will allow crews to begin reconstruction work on the northbound I-35W lanes. Motorists will need to exit at 46th St. during the closure. The ramp will remain closed through September 2021.

Stay safe driving near construction work areas

Please drive with care around construction work zones:

  • Slow down when approaching every work zone, then navigate through with care and caution
  • Stay alert; work zones constantly change
  • Watch for workers and slow moving equipment
  • Obey posted speed limits. Fine for a violation in a work zone is $300.
  • Minimize distractions behind the wheel
  • Be patient; expect delays, especially during peak travel times

All closures are weather permitting and subject to change.

Road work continues to be a critical service. MnDOT is committed to protecting the health, safety and well-being of its employees, contractors and all Minnesotans. Crews continue to follow the guidance of state and federal health officials to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Stay connected

For real-time travel information anywhere in Minnesota visit 511mn.org or dial 5-1-1.


Changes made to the 2020 Budget Revision Schedule, Public hearings now scheduled for July

city of minneapolis

The City Council’s Budget Committee will hold two public hearings in July on proposed revisions to the City’s 2020 budget.

The City faces a significant revenue shortfall as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and needs to make cuts to the City’s roughly $1.5 billion budget.

Mayor Jacob Frey will brief the City Council’s Policy & Government Oversight (POGO) Committee on a revised 2020 budget July 9, and staff will present the revised budget to the City Council July 10.

Public hearings

Engage and share your voice in this process during two online public hearings:

  • 6:05 p.m. Tuesday, July 14
  • 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 22

You can watch the online meetings and participate in the online public hearings.

The City Council is scheduled to vote July 24 on a revised 2020 budget.

For more information about the City’s budget, visit minneapolismn.gov/budget.


USPS Postal Service Impacts to 55408 & 55409 Zip Codes

usps logo

As a precautionary measure, the Postal Service has also temporarily removed some collection boxes in St. Paul and Minneapolis.  They will be back in service when it is deemed safe to do so, and when we are able to collect the mail within them without incident.

Postal Service Impacts

A special window has been set up for customers to pick up their post office box mail and mail held due to damaged businesses or residences.  Mail pick up service will end at 5:00pm.  An ID will be required for all mail pickups.

Customers from ZIP Codes 55408 and 55409 will now be served out of the Loring Post Office in Downtown Minneapolis:

  • Lake Street Station, 110 E 31st St,  55408

    Operations will be relocated to:

    Loring Station, 18 N 12th Street, 55403

    HOURS:
    Monday – Friday
    8:30AM to 5:00PM
    Saturday
    9:00AM to 1:00PM

A special window has been set up for customers to pick up their post office box mail and mail held due to damaged businesses or residences.  An ID will be required for all mail pickups.

As a reminder, PO Box services and package pickups can be done at the relocated location for these services.

Retail services are also available online 24/7 including weekends and holidays at usps.com

Receive a daily email with photos of your mail.  Informed Delivery is a free service that sends customers a picture of their incoming letters each day.  Sign up today at usps.com.

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.


Remember to wear masks or face coverings while in indoor public places

mask requirements image

Remember to wear masks or face coverings while in indoor public places

Minneapolis Mayor Frey’s emergency regulation requiring people in Minneapolis to wear cloth face masks or coverings when they are in an indoor place of public accommodation is in effect.

Medical research has indicated that COVID-19 may have a high rate of transmission through respiratory droplets, particularly while indoors, and that wearing a mask can help reduce the risk of community spread. Research has also shown that people who don’t show signs of the virus can still spread it without knowing they have it.

Businesses will not be required to provide masks to customers or employees themselves, though employers shall be required to mandate the use of masks by their staff.

Watch and share these videos about how to use and make masks:

Non-compliance should be reported through 311.

Find more information here.

Donate homemade face masks at Minneapolis fire stations for Mask Drive Mondays

Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday for Mask Drive Mondays.

Remember to stay 6 feet away from others when dropping off your donation. Note: fire stations are not equipped to take any other donations at this time.

The City plans to distribute the donated masks throughout Minneapolis to residents, organizations and businesses that are most in need, including food shelves, congregate living facilities, small corner stores and shelters.


City Council approves resolution to create transformative new model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis

city of minneapolis

The Minneapolis City Council has approved a resolution declaring the intent to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis.

The council resolution acknowledges that George Floyd joins a “tragically long list” of people killed by Minneapolis police and his death has set off a “wave of protests and uprisings across the United States and across the world and has led to thousands of voices asking for change.”

The City Council has committed to starting a year-long process of community engagement, research and structural change to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis. “The City Council will engage with every willing community member in Minneapolis, centering the voices of Black people, American Indian people, people of color, immigrants, victims of harm, and other stakeholders who have been historically marginalized or under-served by our present system. Together, we will identify what safety looks like for everyone,” the resolution reads.

The resolution also expresses support for Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo and his efforts and the need to work cooperatively with all willing partners, including Mayor Jacob Frey and other community institutions in this effort.

The City Council is establishing a Future of Community Safety Work Group, which will include staff from the Office of Violence Prevention, the Department of Civil Rights, the City Coordinator’s Office, in coordination with the 911 Working Group, the Division of Race and Equity, Neighborhood and Community Relations and other relevant departments.

The City Council has directed the work group to report back to the Council by July 24 with a set of preliminary recommendations for engaging with specific cultural and stakeholder groups, the community at large and relevant experts that can partner with the City to help Minneapolis transition to a transformative new model for cultivating community safety, including budget and resource need estimates for the process.

The work group is also directed to provide regular reports to the City Council on advancing this work, including intermediate policy changes that center a public health approach to community safety and research and engagement to inform the potential creation of a new City Department of Community Safety with a holistic approach to community safety, among other things.


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

Jeremy Schroeder, Ward 11 City Council Member

Jeremy schroeder

jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov

(612) 673-2211

Ward 11,

At our City Council meeting this morning, my colleagues and I unanimously approved a resolution that includes several next steps for our public safety work in Minneapolis. You can read the full text of this morning’s resolution here.

This resolution does not make immediate changes to how our public safety system operates, but it does officially commit us to a number of inclusive, community-driven next steps to shape something better. While I have been in conversation with many, many Ward 11 residents over the previous weeks about public safety, this marks the start of the official process to bring together all community members and ideas as we move forward.

The resolution specifically includes following actions:

  • A yearlong process of community engagement, research, and structural change to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety in our city
  • Engaging with every willing community member in Minneapolis while centering the voices of stakeholders historically marginalized or under-served by our existing system in order to identify together what safety looks like for everyone
  • Working with local and national leaders on transformative justice, informed by the needs of every block in our city
  • Forming a Future of Community Safety Work Group, which will include staff from the Office of Violence Prevention, the Department of Civil Rights, the City Coordinator’s Office, in coordination with the 911 Working Group, the Division of Race and Equity, Neighborhood and Community Relations and other relevant departments

Most immediately, the Future of Community Safety Work Group will report back to the City Council this summer with a set of preliminary recommendations for a robust community engagement process on the future of our public safety system. Going forward, the Work Group will give regular updates to the City Council and the public. We expect to hear about:

  • Exploration of intermediate policy changes, investments, and partnerships that center a public health approach to community safety and alternatives to policing
  • Research and engagement to inform the potential creation of a new City Department of Community Safety, including analysis of existing models, programs, and practices that could be applied in Minneapolis
  • Recommendations and strategies for transitioning work of the Minneapolis Police Department where possible to alternative service providers, including other City departments, agencies, and/or community partners
  • Recommendations for additional community safety strategies that build upon existing work across the City enterprise that approaches public safety through a public health lens

Also at this morning’s Council meeting, several of my colleagues signaled their interest in pursuing a ballot measure that would allow voters this November to decide whether to create a new Department of Community Safety in our City Charter. This measure will move through our Charter amendment process, including an opportunity for public comment. In keeping with our required process and timelines, the proposed language for this measure will be shared at our next City Council meeting on Friday, June 26. This is merely the beginning of a multifaceted process to consider adding this measure to the ballot – it is not a done deal and there will be much discussion.

I am looking forward to learning more from community as our process progresses, particularly when it comes time for public comment, and will continue to support transparency along the way. Ultimately, I have not yet taken an official position on this proposal – and I will not do so until proposed language is finalized and I have heard from Ward 11 residents – but in general I am supportive of exploring a ballot measure that would allow voters to be heard.

As I’ve said all along, I believe there is a place for focused and accountable law enforcement in our community. We know that the MPD is not currently meeting that standard. As taxpayer-funded City employees, this is unacceptable. To be clear, our ongoing work to improve the public safety system in Minneapolis will take time. The MPD remains responsible for public safety today. This will be true as we work through the processes outlined in the resolution passed this morning. We will continue to need folks who can respond to extreme or violent situations, but it is my hope that we can reduce our reliance on armed officers who – while necessary in some cases – are not best-suited to constructively respond to many calls (like mental health crises, reported low-level offenses, and other incidents). In any new system, there will be a voice on the other end of the 911 line to help. Communities will not be left to fend for themselves, but rather supported in their safety.

It’s important to remember that we are not starting from scratch. The City Council in past budgets has already funded the Office of Violence Prevention, which has seen successes. We will closely examine other cities’ experiences with violence interruption programs and non-police first responder models to help us determine what’s best for Minneapolis. And when I say “us,” I mean us. In adopting the resolution put forward today, my colleagues and I made clear we will not commit to any plan or program – let alone system-level change – without expansive input from members of our community.

Thank you for joining me in this work. There is room for all of us and all our perspectives as we make long-overdue and necessary improvements.

In solidarity and community,

Jeremy

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

City logo reverse

Andrea Jenkins, City Council Vice-President: 8th Ward Update

CM Andrea Jenkins

612.673.2208

andrea.jenkins@MinneapolisMN.gov

Office Hours: Monday 9-11 a.m.

Sabathani Community Center, 310 E. 38th St.

A message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Dear Neighbors,

The City of Minneapolis is in a mode of deep, transformational change. The death of George Floyd and the subsequent protests and unrest will undoubtedly leave our community permanently scarred. But we are resilient, we are strong, we protect each other, and we stand up for what is right.

I have been heartened by the immediate response of neighbors to come to each others aid, protecting homes and businesses, caring for our most vulnerable. We are going to need that same level of engagement in the coming weeks and months as we begin the hard work of transforming our current model of antiquated policing into a 21st Century Public Safety continuum that keeps everyone in our community safe. We must center the voices of Black and Brown communities in this work as they have been the communities most harmed and most impacted by the systemic racism that has infected MPD, and all of the institutions that constitute the society that we live in.

Also, I am working with the Division of Race and Equity, the University of Minnesota and the Minneapolis Department of Public Health to develop a Resolution declaring Racism as a Public Health Crisis. This is important work that I believe will provide a framework to begin to address these deeply rooted barriers to full liberation. Lastly, to our neighbors in and around the site of what has become the George Floyd Memorial. I know that you have been inundated with foreign and national media, visitors from all over the state and country, there has been loud music, rerouted buses, these issues are more than just annoyances and I am working with community and city leaders to bring an end to this phase and begin to create a more permanent memorial in the area.

e-signature

City Council approves resolution to create transformative new model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis

city of minneapolis banner

The Minneapolis City Council unanimously approved a resolution today declaring the intent to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis.

The Council resolution acknowledges that George Floyd joins a “tragically long list” of people killed by Minneapolis police and his death has set off a “wave of protests and uprisings across the United States and across the world and has led to thousands of voices asking for change.”

The City Council has committed to starting a year-long process of community engagement, research and structural change to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis. “The City Council will engage with every willing community member in Minneapolis, centering the voices of Black people, American Indian people, people of color, immigrants, victims of harm, and other stakeholders who have been historically marginalized or under-served by our present system. Together, we will identify what safety looks like for everyone,” the resolution reads.

The resolution also expresses support for Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo and his efforts and the need to work cooperatively with all willing partners, including Mayor Jacob Frey and other community institutions in this effort.

The City Council is establishing a Future of Community Safety Work Group, which will include staff from the Office of Violence Prevention, the Department of Civil Rights, the City Coordinator’s Office, in coordination with the 911 Working Group, the Division of Race and Equity, Neighborhood and Community Relations and other relevant departments.

The Council has directed the work group to report back to the Council by July 24, 2020 with a set of preliminary recommendations for engaging with specific cultural and stakeholder groups, the community at large and relevant experts that can partner with the City to help Minneapolis transition to a transformative new model for cultivating community safety, including budget and resource need estimates for the process.

The work group is also directed to provide regular reports to the City Council on advancing this work, including intermediate policy changes that center a public health approach to community safety and research and engagement to inform the potential creation of a new City Department of Community Safety with a holistic approach to community safety, among other things.

“Today’s unanimous City Council resolution advances our shared commitment to transformative change in how Minneapolis approaches public safety so that every member of our community can be truly safe,” said City Council President Lisa Bender. “As we respond to demands for immediate action to reduce police violence and support community safety, we will invite our community to help shape long-term transformative change, centering the voices of those most impacted by community violence and police violence.”

“American democracy is an experiment, each generation has an opportunity to move this experiment forward, toward living out the true meaning of its creed,” said City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins. “This resolution represents our moment to contribute to the progression of equality and freedom of every resident of the City of Minneapolis.”


Saturday, June 13 from 11 am to 1 pm for the Graduates & Resilience Celebration: South Minneapolis Community Strong Event

we rise celebration graphic

The emotional and physical fallout from the recent and senseless death of George Floyd is ongoing. This Community Strong Event hosted in collaboration with local leaders, the Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association and the Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization seeks to assist the slow work of demonstrating kindness, comfort, unity, and resolve that helps move our community from outrage to an unwavering commitment to pursue justice for George Floyd and all who live, work, or play in South Minneapolis.

Together, we can honor 2020 Graduates and the resilience of everyone in South Minneapolis. Make plans to drive-up, bike-up, or walk-up and spend a few moments being celebrated as the future and the answer to our community’s healing.

Graduates can expect to receive a token of our community’s appreciation for your accomplishments. And all community members are invited to help demonstrate a show of peaceful solidarity in taking more necessary steps in our community’s long recovery.

When: Saturday, June 13th from 11 am to 1 pm

Where: Pillsbury House Theatre, 3501 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55407

Drive-up, bike-up, or walk-up on Saturday and spend a few moments being celebrated as the future and the answer to our community’s healing.

Calling all graduates! We’re celebrating your resilience this Saturday! Fill out this form to get a special shout-out https://forms.gle/pBhSbvd9hSmbm6Dn7 and stop by on Saturday for a token of our appreciation for your hard work!


Three special COVID-19 testing sites available for critical neighborhoods; testing recommended for people who have been in large gatherings

stay safe mn banner

The State has added special COVID-19 testing sites for critical communities for people who have recently been a part of large gatherings whether or not they have symptoms. Make sure to preregister for a time slot if you can before heading over to be sure you have a spot. Appointments have been filling up fast. People who arrive without an appointment might have to come back later or another day. Appointments for the next week will open up on Wednesdays, so if you don’t find anything available, keep checking back.

The Minnesota Department of Health recommends that any Minnesotan who has attended a protest, vigil or community cleanup get tested for COVID-19, which can spread easily and quickly in large groups of people who are close together for long periods of time. Even people who do not have symptoms can still spread the virus to others.

Residents who live in the area of these three outdoor sites who have recently been a part of large gatherings are invited to preregister for free COVID-19 testing:

  • Holy Trinity Church (pedestrians) 2730 E. 31st St.
  • Sabathani Community Center (drive up, limited pedestrians) 310 E. 38th St.
  • New Salem Baptist Church (pedestrians) 2507 Bryant Ave. N.

Preregister

Make sure to preregister for a time slot if possible before heading over to be sure you have a spot. Appointments have been filling up fast. People who arrive without an appointment might have to come back later or another day. Appointments for the next week will open up on Wednesdays. People who join the waiting list will be notified when slots open up.

The registration form is in English, Spanish, Somali and Hmong. Spanish, Somali and Hmong interpreters will be onsite. Interpreting for other languages will be available by phone.

Preregister for a time slot and find more information online here or by phone at 1-800-657-3903 if you don’t have internet access or need interpreting.

Testing for other communities

If you do not live in the neighborhood of one of these three new sites, use this directory to find a testing location near you.

Note: Once you’ve been tested for COVID-19, it’s important to self-isolate until you receive your test results to avoid infecting others in case you test positive. If your test is positive, the Minnesota Department of Health recommends staying home for at least 10 days and until you have three days fever-free without using fever reducing meds.


Hennepin County now offering Rental Assistance Funds

hennepin county

Hennepin County has up to $15 million available to help low-income renters who can’t afford their housing costs this month due to COVID-19. Even though there is a temporary hold on evictions, rent is still due.

Folks may qualify for emergency assistance if they:

  • Rent anywhere in Hennepin County.
  • Had household income below 50% of the area median income (about $46,550 for a three-person household) before COVID-19.
  • Lost income due to COVID-19 that has not been replaced by unemployment insurance or other emergency assistance.
  • Can’t afford housing costs this month.
  • Are not currently receiving Section 8 or other rental assistance.

There is no deadline to apply. Priority will be given to households with the lowest incomes and those not eligible for unemployment insurance.

Apply

Learn more and apply for assistance.

If you do not have internet access or cannot complete the form in English call 612-302-3160.


Learn about the City’s new renter protection rules

renter protections graphic with information

You can find shareable flyers for both renters and owners in English, Spanish, Somali, and Hmong here.

A new City ordinance strengthening protections for renters in Minneapolis took effect June 1. The ordinance places a cap on security deposits and limits what a rental property owner can use to deny rental applications. The new rules apply even if the rental property owner doesn’t charge an application fee.

The ordinance goes into effect June 1 for owners with more than 15 rental units. The effective date for property owners with 15 rental units or fewer is Dec. 1. Rental property owners have to share their rental screening criteria with renters in writing before they apply for a unit.

Inclusive screening criteria will set limits on what information in a renter’s criminal, rental and credit history can be used to deny a rental application. Rental property owners who don’t use the inclusive screening criteria will have to individually evaluate applicants based upon their screening criteria and review all supplement evidence provided to them. If an application is denied, rental property owners have to specifically state the basis for the denial in writing.

Security deposits will be capped at one month’s rent, or one-half month’s rent if the landlord requires first and last month’s rent to be paid in advance. If they require the first and last month’s rent to be paid along with the security deposit, renters must have the option to pay the security deposit in installments over three months.

Enforcement will be through the City’s housing maintenance code. This follows previous renter protection efforts adopted recently, including relocation assistance for displaced renters and a requirement that owners of naturally occurring affordable housing rental property give the City 60 days’ notice before selling their units.

To learn more, visit minneapolismn.gov/renterprotections.

Participate in an informational Webinar about the new renter protections

The City is hosting a series of webinars to walk you through the details of the ordinance, the resources available to help implement changes, and how the City will oversee compliance.

  • June 17, 2:00 p.m. (geared towards housing service providers and renter advocates)
  • June 24, 6:30 p.m. (Spanish language)
  • June 29, 6:30 p.m. (geared towards renters)
  • June 30, 10:00 a.m. (geared towards property owners)

Use our Google Form to sign up and receive a link to the webinar.

You can also view a past webinar on renter screening.


Court orders Minneapolis Police Department to make immediate changes

minneapolis banner

Hennepin County Court has approved the proposed court order filed by the Minnesota Department of Human Rights that requires the Minneapolis Police Department to implement initial structural changes, as part of the State’s ongoing civil rights investigation. The court has the power to enforce these preliminary measures and failure to comply with the order could lead to penalties.

Under the court order entered by Hennepin County District Court Judge Karen Janisch, the City of Minneapolis must implement several measures immediately, including banning the use of all neck restraints and chokeholds.

The court order also requires the Minneapolis Police Department to fully comply with the ongoing civil rights investigation by the Minnesota Department of Human Rights.

Any Minnesotan who witnesses or experiences violations of the terms in the order should contact the Minnesota Department of Human Rights by calling 651-539-1100 or 1-800-657-3704.

The Minneapolis City Council has also approved the terms.

The Minnesota Department of Human Rights launched an investigation into the MPD June 2 after filing a civil rights charge related to the death of George Floyd. The investigation into policies, procedures and practices over the past 10 years will determine if the MPD has engaged in systematic discriminatory practices toward people of color and ensure any such practices are stopped.

The order specifies that MPD and the City must implement the following measures immediately:

  • MPD must ban neck restraints or chokeholds for any reason within 10 days of the effective date of the order.
  • Regardless of tenure or rank, any member of the MPD who observes another member of the MPD use any unauthorized use of force, including any chokehold or neck restraint, has an affirmative duty to immediately report the incident while still on scene by phone or radio to their commander or their commander’s superiors.
  • Regardless of tenure or rank, any member of the MPD who observes another member of the MPD use any unauthorized use of force, including any chokehold or neck restraint, must attempt to safely intervene by verbal and physical means, and if they do not do so they are subject to discipline to the same severity as if they themselves engaged in the prohibited use of force.
  • Only the police chief or the chief’s designee at the rank of deputy chief or above may authorize the use of crowd control weapons during protests and demonstrations.
  • The police chief must make timely discipline decisions as outlined in the order.
  • Civilian body-worn camera analysts and investigators with the City’s Office of Police Conduct Review have the authority to proactively audit body-worn camera footage and file or amend complaints on behalf of the Minneapolis Civil Rights Department.

The order also commits the City to working with the Minnesota Department of Human Rights on several fronts to build toward systemic change within MPD as part of the long-term investigation.

The City will prepare a report listing all of the State of Minnesota laws that impede public transparency of police data and/or prevent the mayor and police chief and/or impede civilian oversight from disciplining and terminating police officers who do not adhere to Minneapolis Police Department policies and standards. The report is due by July 30.

Minnesotans with information that can further the investigation into the MPD should contact the Department of Human Rights at mn.gov/mdhr or 651-539-1100.

Read the stipulation and order.


The State’s Stay Safe MN plan entered its third phase on Wednesday, June 10

safely adjusting the dials

Phase III of the Stay Safe MN plan, including a gradual turn of the dial to allow cautious and safe re-opening of indoor dining, gyms and entertainment venues, has begun.

Occupancy rates will be limited based on risk, with an overall occupancy maximum of 250 people. All critical businesses are required to develop and implement a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan by June 29, and the Department of Health (MDH), Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED), and Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) will publish industry guidance by June 15. Under Phase III of the Stay Safe MN plan:

  • Restaurants can begin offering indoor dining while maintaining social distancing, requiring reservations, and seating no more than 50% occupancy.
  • Indoor social gatherings can take place with 10 people or less; outdoor social gatherings can take place with 25 people or less.
  • Gyms and personal fitness, yoga and martial arts studios may open at 25% capacity.
  • Indoor entertainment venues, such as theaters and concert halls, can open at 25 percent capacity.
  • Recreational indoor entertainment venues, such as bowling alleys, arcades and museums may open at 25% capacity.
  • Personal services venues such as salons, tattoo parlors and barbershops may increase occupancy rates to 50% while requiring reservations.
  • Outdoor entertainment venues, such as sporting events, concerts and theaters may open at 25% capacity.
  • Places of worship can increase occupancy rates to 50%.

Restaurants, salons and barbershops have been able to offer limited service since June 1. Takeout, curbside, and delivery services have been permitted throughout the pandemic in Minnesota.

City of Minneapolis guidance for businesses on opening.


Sign up online to vote early by mail this election year

your city your votes

With health officials advising everyone to reduce contact to keep each other safe during the pandemic, the City of Minneapolis is recommending voting early by mail this election year. Voters can sign up now to get ballots for the August primary and November general election mailed to them. Ballots will arrive approximately six weeks before those elections, along with postage-paid envelopes for return.

All Minnesota voters are eligible to vote early by mail. Ballot applications should be made no later than 10 days before an election so the ballots can arrive in the mail with enough time for voters to return them.

Although voting early by mail is recommended, voters will still be able to cast their ballots in person at the City’s Early Vote Center, 980 E. Hennepin Ave., or at their polling places on the day of the election.

Making voting safe during the pandemic

The City of Minneapolis is working closely with the Minnesota Department of Health and Hennepin County to be prepared and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging voting early by mail, and Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services supports this and other CDC and Minnesota Department of Health recommendations to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballots this election year.

Video

Watch this video about voting by mail.

Sign up to vote by mail at vote.minneapolismn.gov.


Disaster Relief Available for Property Damaged or Destroyed Due to Recent Civil Disturbance

city of minneapolis banner

If your property sustained damage during recent civil unrest, you may be eligible for property tax relief.  Relief is available in the forms of tax abatements for the current 2020 tax year and for tax credits for taxes payable in 2021.

Teams of city staff have been going through the city, property by property, to document damaged structures.  The Assessor’s Office is in the process of reviewing the reported damage to determine the percent of damage for each property affected.  They will contact you by letter if your property has been identified as damaged with instructions for the next steps in the disaster relief process.

If your property was damaged and you have not heard from the Assessor’s Office by June 19, 2020, you should call 612.673.5959 or email disaster.reassessment@minneapolismn.gov.


Gas service assistance from CenterPoint Energy

center point energy

CenterPoint Energy offers payment plans and other assistance for residents and small businesses that may be struggling financially.

Payment plans

Paying your natural gas bills to the extent possible can avoid accumulating large unpaid balances. To arrange a payment plan based on your specific circumstances, call CenterPoint Energy Customer Service at 612-372-4727 or 800-245-2377.

Suspending disconnections and late payment fees

Since March, CenterPoint Energy has suspended natural gas disconnections for nonpayment and has temporarily waived late payment fees and interest on past due balances.

Other assistance

  • CenterPoint Energy has a dedicated webpage with information about various types of federal and county assistance available for customers who need help paying their natural gas bill.
  • The Minnesota Energy Assistance Program (EAP) recently received additional funding that allows even more Minnesota households to get help. To find your local EAP service provider, call 800-657-3710 and follow the prompts to enter your ZIP code, or consult a list of service providers by county or tribe available at this webpage.

Enhanced safety during the pandemic

While working throughout the pandemic, CenterPoint Energy has measures to protect the safety and health of customers, employees and contractors. These measures include: physical distancing, asking permission and reading a safety protocol script before entering a customer’s home or business, using face masks and other personal protective equipment, sanitizing tools, and regularly washing hands with soap or hand sanitizer.


Route changes from Metro Transit for 38th & Chicago

detour map

Map key: 

  • Route 5 Northbound: Red
  • Route 5 Southbound: Blue
  • Route 23 Westbound: Green
  • Route 23 Eastbound: Orange

Route 5 Northbound: Chicago to 42nd, Left on 42nd to Park, Right on Park to 36th, Right on 36th to Chicago, Left on Chicago and regular route. Passengers directed to Chicago/42nd, Park/38th, Chicago/35th.

Route 5 Southbound: Chicago to 35th, Right on 35th to Portland, Left on Portland to 42nd, Left on 42nd to Chicago, Right on Chicago and regular route. Passengers directed to Chicago 35th, Portland/38th, Chicago/42nd.

Route 23 Westbound: 38th to Bloomington, Left on Bloomington to 42nd, Right on 42nd to Park, Right on Park to 38th, Left on 38th and regular route. Passengers directed to 38th/Portland, 42nd/Chicago or 38th/Bloomington.

Route 23 Eastbound: 38th to Portland, Right on Portland to 42nd, Left on 42nd to Bloomington, Left on Bloomington to 38th, Right on 38th and regular route. Passengers directed to 38th/Portland, 42nd/Chicago or 38th/Bloomington.

Metro Transit buses and light rail services are on reduced schedules. Keep up to date on the Metro Transit website.


Donate homemade face masks at Minneapolis fire stations for Mask Drive Mondays

image of cloth masks

Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday for Mask Drive Mondays.

Remember to stay 6 feet away from others when dropping off your donation. Note: fire stations are not equipped to take any other donations at this time.

The City plans to distribute the donated masks throughout Minneapolis to residents, organizations and businesses that are most in need, including food shelves, congregate living facilities, small corner stores and shelters.


Resources and Information for questions regarding food, clothing, financial, and medication

minneapolis banner

With the loss of grocery stores and other damage affecting people’s access to food, clothing, financial assistance, groceries, medical care and equipment, and medication, the City is compiling this list of resources to help residents.

Note: Information is changing rapidly. Please confirm the locations are still accepting or handing out donations before heading out.

  • All Minneapolis food shelves Food shelves help ensure all Minneapolis residents have steady access to food. A map to help you find a food shelf and other food resources is available on the City’s website. More resources are listed below the map.
  • Minneapolis Public Schools free meals for kids Daily free food boxes for pickup. Seven breakfasts and seven lunches including fresh produce for anyone 18 and under. All families are welcome. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday now until further notice.
  • Free meals for kids app More resources for free meals for anyone under 18.
  • MN Food Helpline Online map of food resources Or call phone hotline at 1-888-711-1151 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.
  • SNAP-EBT emergency food services expanded eligibility Plus online purchasing and delivery through Amazon and Walmart. Participants with questions can call 651-431-4050 or 800-657-3698 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday starting June 1. People who use SNAP and don’t want to leave their homes to get food can authorize a trusted relative, friend or neighbor to pick up and deliver groceries using their electronic benefits card. They must contact their county or tribal financial worker to make the authorization. Minnesotans can fill out an application for SNAP online at ApplyMN.dhs.mn.gov. For help applying or additional food resources, contact the Food Helpline at 1-888-711-1151 or visit Hunger Solutions.
  • Food and financial assistance The Minnesota Department of Human Services has temporarily made it easier for people to get and use the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, which offers monthly food benefits. Information about SNAP and other hunger resources is collected on the department’s new food emergency webpage.
  • If you weren’t receiving SNAP or MFIP but your child had free or reduced lunch, you can apply for P-EBT to help buy food for your family. Apply starting noon June 8.
  • South Minneapolis food distribution efforts (Note: Some may be pop-up efforts not licensed by the City of Minneapolis.)
    • CANDO (Central Neighborhood Development Organization) Accepting drop-offs at 3715 Chicago Ave., 612-824-1333
    • Simpson Food Pantry, 2740 First Ave. S.; 612-874-7741
    • CAPI (Center for Asian and Pacific Islanders) Food Shelf, 612-721-0122
    • Twin Cities Democratic Socialist of America (TCDSA) are hosting food distribution of hot meals and fresh produce for all southside residents. Northern Sun, 2916 E. Lake St.
  • Minneapolis farmers markets
  • Clothing, financial assistance, groceries, medical care and equipment, and medication through Hennepin County Call 612-348-3000 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.Help is available in multiple languages. Residents in need of assistance are assigned a Human Services Navigator to help connect to available services and resources.
  • Pet food The People & Pets Together pet food shelf is open to residents of Minneapolis who need help feeding and caring for pets. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Saturday. No appointment necessary. 3745 Bloomington Ave. S., 612-722-9998

Follow protocols to stay safer during COVID-19 if you start going out

Mask Up

Remember to wear masks or face coverings while in indoor public places

Minneapolis Mayor Frey’s emergency regulation requiring people in Minneapolis to wear cloth face masks or coverings when they are in an indoor place of public accommodation is in effect.

Medical research has indicated that COVID-19 may have a high rate of transmission through respiratory droplets, particularly while indoors, and that wearing a mask can help reduce the risk of community spread. Research has also shown that people who don’t show signs of the virus can still spread it without knowing they have it.

Businesses will not be required to provide masks to customers or employees themselves, though employers shall be required to mandate the use of masks by their staff.

Watch and share these videos about how to use and make masks:

Non-compliance should be reported through 311.

Find more information here.


Use online forms for requests to 311

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You already know 311 as the non-emergency number for City services and information, but did you know you could use our online forms instead of calling? You can use any of these methods:


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

Jeremy Schroeder: Ward 11 Bulletin

Jeremy schroeder

jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov

(612) 673-2211

Ward 11 Neighbors,

After several days of relative calm, I hope that you have been able to find time to rest and reflect on all that has happened in our city.

I am filled with gratitude for the countless neighbors who have contacted me to share their belief that we are in dire need of a new approach to public safety in Minneapolis. While our community does not have a unified voice on precisely what this should look like, we overwhelmingly share a belief something better is possible and necessary.

On Sunday, I joined many of my colleagues to stand with community members and commit to a robust process to determine what’s next for public safety in Minneapolis. This was not an official City Council meeting, and despite what’s being reported in national media, we did not vote on anything. Instead, we took this pledge to make clear our intentions to dig into this work and better serve our community:

Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed and will never be accountable for its actions.

We are here today to begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department and creating a new transformative model for cultivating safety in our city.

We recognize that we don’t have all the answers about what a police-free future looks like, but our community does.

We’re committing to engaging with every willing community member in the City of Minneapolis over the next year to identify what safety looks like for everyone.

We’ll be taking intermediate steps towards ending the MPD through the budget process and other policy and budget decisions over the coming weeks and months.

You can expect to be part of a comprehensive, thoughtful, and inclusive process going forward. Change will be rooted in deep engagement with community members. Keeping Minneapolis residents safe is and will continue to be one of the City’s most important jobs, both while we undertake this process and beyond.

In recent weeks, I have received thousands of voicemails and emails (and counting) and at the same time our City website has faced cyber attack. For now, emailing jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov is still the best way to reach me. I appreciate your patience and understanding if you are waiting to hear back.


What’s Next for Public Safety

As I have said already, I am committed to disinvesting in the MPD as it exists today and rebuilding a public safety system designed to serve the public with compassion and respect. George Floyd’s murder represents the latest in a too-long list of reasons to build something different and better. Over the next year, I look forward to working in partnership with community members to imagine and implement transformational changes.

I believe there is a place for focused and accountable law enforcement in this city. We know the MPD is not meeting that standard. I also believe there is a place for community outreach strategies by mental health professionals and others trained to respond without force. The transformation of our public safety system will take time. This process is only beginning. I hope the many, many Ward 11 neighbors who have contacted me in recent weeks stay engaged over the long haul – and I invite the rest of you to join in.

All of our neighbors must be cared for and safe – now, as we work through the next year, and after we determine the best long-term path. In the near term, I am supportive of:

  • Shifting public safety funding from MPD to violence prevention and community-based programs
  • Creating shared oversight of the MPD between the City Council, which does not currently have operational oversight of the department, and the Mayor; I have advocated for this throughout my time in office
  • Completing the study I proposed as part of last year’s budget process to determine roles/job duties that can be transferred out of the Minneapolis Police Department to other parts of the City, then following through on making those changes
  • Exploring options to contract with other jurisdictions like Hennepin County to provide for public safety
  • Fighting state law that prevents Minneapolis from imposing a residency requirement for police officers
  • Fighting state laws that limit civilian oversight of law enforcement, especially by prohibiting these civilian agencies imposing discipline on officers
  • Pursuing the creation of and significant investment in a new City department to respond to community issues/conflicts and to provide help without force, totally separate from the Minneapolis Police Department
  • Exploring ways to end the City’s relationship with the Minneapolis Police Federation

This is not a complete list. I remain openminded as we consider options going forward. What I can say for sure is that incremental change has failed us. It is time for full transformation. We must do better.


State Investigation Requires Immediate Police Reforms

The City is working in partnership with the Department of Human Rights in this process, including by approving on the terms of a stipulation for a temporary restraining order that sets in motion a review of MPD actions. The order, supported unanimously by the City Council on Friday, includes a slate of measures that must be implemented immediately, including:

  • MPD must ban neck restraints or choke holds for any reason within 10 days of the effective date of this order.
  • Regardless of tenure or rank, any member of the MPD who observes another member of the MPD use any unauthorized use of force, including any choke hold or neck restraint, has an affirmative duty to immediately report the incident while still on scene by phone or radio to their commander or their commander’s superiors.
  • Regardless of tenure or rank, any member of the MPD who observes another member of the MPD use any unauthorized use of force, including any choke hold or neck restraint, must attempt to safely intervene by verbal and physical means, and if they do not do so they are subject to discipline to the same severity as if they themselves engaged in the prohibited use of force.
  • Only the police chief or the chief’s designee at the rank of deputy chief or above may authorize the use of crowd control weapons during protests and demonstrations.
  • The police chief must make timely discipline decisions as outlined in the order.
  • Civilian body warn camera analysts and investigators with the City’s Office of Police Conduct Review have the authority to proactively audit body worn camera footage and file or amend complaints on behalf of the Minneapolis Civil Rights Department.

Find additional information on Friday’s order here.

The state’s process is expected to take several months, and every City Council member has agreed to support this work as full partners. The investigation will probe will examine MPD policies, procedures, and practices over the past 10 years to determine whether the department has engaged in systematic discriminatory practices against people of color. It will also ensure any such practices are stopped. Anyone with information that can help with the investigation should contact the Department of Human Rights at 651-539-1100.


Council Moves to Lift Requirement to Hire Off-Duty MPD

In related news, the City Council last week approved a staff direction at our Policy & Governance Oversight Committee meeting that instructs Business Licensing staff to stop requiring the use of off-duty MPD officers at special events. Small business owners and event staff ought to have the freedom to manage their security needs without MPD if that’s what they prefer. Council Member Cam Gordon brought this measure forward quickly in response to concerns raised by community members in recent weeks, and I am glad we are taking swift action to provide more flexibility.


As Businesses Reopen, Practice COVID-19 Precautions

While public safety has taken center stage in recent weeks, it is still critical for us all to pay attention to public health guidance. The COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting our community, and it is critical that we continue to do what we can to limit its spread. I urge you to continue to do everything possible to stay safe even as things start to feel more “normal” with business operations expanded later this week.

In Minneapolis, people are required to wear masks indoors at places of public accommodation such as stores, hotels, government buildings, schools, recreational facilities, and service centers. The state still advises folks to stay close to home and limit travel to what is essential. Please avoid large groups. And if you gather in a smaller group, practice physical distancing with masks and wash your hands frequently. Those at greatest risk of serious illness should continue staying home.

Starting on Wednesday, Governor Walz under his Stay Safe MN order will allow the following:

Restaurants and bars to reopen for indoor service if they

  • Have adopted and implemented a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan
  • Ensure a minimum of 6 feet of distance between tables
  • Limit indoor occupant capacity to no more than 50% up to 250 persons
  • Do not exceed 250 persons in outdoor spaces
  • Limit table service to 4 persons, or 6 if part of one family unit
  • Require reservations
  • Require workers to wear masks at all times and strongly encourage customers to wear masks when not eating or drinking

 Gyms, studios and fitness centers to reopen if they

  • Have adopted and implemented a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan
  • Ensure social distancing (6 ft between persons) and limit occupant capacity to no more than 25%; not to exceed 250 persons for indoor and outdoor settings each
  • Strongly encourage that masks be worn by workers and users
  • Establish regular disinfection routine and train staff
  • Ensure ≥6 ft of distancing between equipment; greater distancing should be implemented for treadmills and other aerobic activity that encourages high exertion
  • Group exercise classes should only be offered if distancing requirements can be maintained and with no person-to-person physical contact

 Seated and recreational entertainment and meeting venues to reopen if they

  • Have adopted and implemented a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan
  • Limit occupant capacity to no more than 25% not to exceed 250 persons
  • Ensure social distancing and a minimum of 6 feet between persons
  • Strongly encourage masks for workers and customers

Personal care services (such as hair salons, barbershops and tattoo parlors) to reopen to provide services indoors if they

  • Have adopted and implemented a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan
  • Limit number of clients inside the business at any time to ensure 6 feet of distance between persons except when providing services
  • Limit occupant capacity to no more than 50% not to exceed 250 persons
  • See clients by appointment only; do not allow walk-ins
  • Require workers and clients to wear masks at all times. For services where the client cannot wear a mask, the worker should
  • add a face shield in addition to their mask.

All workers who have previously been working from home must continue doing so. Minnesota’s Stay Safe Plan includes details about what is open and what restrictions exist. If you have questions about returning to work, businesses reopenings, or other topics related to COVID-19, use this form to contact the state.


Attended a Protest or Community Clean-up? Get Tested

If you’ve participated in protests, vigils, or clean-ups in recent weeks, please get tested for COVID-19. As we know, this virus can spread easily and quickly in large groups of people who are close together for long periods of time. Even people who do not have symptoms can still spread the virus to others.

Starting this week, the Minnesota Department of Health is offering free tests in the most affected communities. You do not need to have insurance or symptoms to get tested, but please schedule your appointment in advance. If you do not live in these areas, you should prioritize getting tested at your local clinic if that’s an option for you. Get more information on various testing locations and make an appointment here.


Rent Assistance Available for Those Affected by COVID-19

Hennepin County is offering residents who have been financially impacted by COVID-19 emergency assistance to help cover rent and other housing costs. You may qualify if you are a Hennepin County resident who had household income below 50% of the area median income before COVID-19 (that translates to $46,550 for a family of three), if you lost income due to COVID-19, and if you can’t afford your housing costs this month. Find the full list of eligibility criteria and application materials here. Households with enough income to pay housing costs are not eligible. There is no deadline to apply.


Get Updates on City’s COVID-19 Response

Find details on our local COVID-19 response and various resources on the City’s COVID-19 website. In addition, City staff regularly update this online dashboard that uses state data to show the number of confirmed cases in our city, how many people needed hospitalization, how many have recovered, and how many have died. You can find statewide data here.


Donate Homemade Face Masks on Mask Drive Mondays

Folks can deliver homemade masks to their local Minneapolis Fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday as part of Mask Drive Mondays, a new initiative to help satisfy the need for face coverings in our community. Public health officials remain in agreement that cloth face coverings help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The CDC has instructions for making cloth face masks here.

Generous donors contributed 2,400 masks plus 100 more child-sized masks during a Memorial Day mask drive, prompting us to keep this going. The City plans to distribute donated masks to Minneapolis residents, organizations, and businesses that are most in need. These include food shelves, congregate living facilities, corner stores, and shelters. Please remember to stay six feet away from others when dropping off your donation. Fire stations are not equipped to take any other donations at this time.


Food Shelves Seeking Monetary Contributions

I’m grateful to have heard from many community members who are eager to help neighbors however they can during this challenging time. Many local service providers have been overwhelmed by the generosity shown thus far, especially with regard to food donations. Please be sure to check with organizations before dropping off donations to see what they need.

One of the best ways to reach hungry people is through food shelves – and a great way to help food shelves right now is with monetary donations. The dollars go much further through their own purchases and help food shelf operators better manage items to prevent spoiling. Financial contributions also allow food shelves to purchase specific items needed by the community.

Please note that Minneapolis Public Schools has been overwhelmed by the community’s generosity and is not able to accept food donations or supplies at its food distribution sites or schools at this time. For information on how to support food shelves and meal sites, please visit the Health Department’s food donations page or check out this resources to see specific needs shared by food shelves.


Urgent Need for Blood and Plasma Donations

The Red Cross has once again identified an urgent need for blood donations. You can still safely donate blood during the COVID-19 pandemic and eligible donors can do so every eight weeks. You can find donation locations and make an appointment through the Red Cross here or Memorial Blood Centers here.

Also, people who have fully recovered from COVID-19 have antibodies in their plasma that can attack the virus. Use of this plasma is being evaluated as treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening COVID-19 infections. In coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Red Cross is seeking folks who are fully recovered from COVID-19 to sign up to donate plasma to help current patients. Get more information on COVID-19 plasma donation here.


Have You Applied for Your Mail-in Ballot?

With health officials advising us all to do what we can to reduce contact with others during the COVID-19 pandemic, I strongly encourage you to vote early by mail this election year. All Minnesota voters can sign up now to get ballots by mail for the August primary and November general election. Ballots will arrive about six weeks before each election, along with postage-paid envelopes to return them. Every Minnesota voter is eligible to vote early by mail – you do not need to give a reason.

Apply for your ballot at least 10 days before an election so you have enough time to receive and return it – it’s quick and easy, and it’s a great idea to take care of it now to be on the safe side. Although voting by mail is strongly recommended, voters will still be able to cast their ballots in person at the City’s Early Vote Center or at their polling places on Election Day. The CDC is encouraging voting early by mail, and the City’s Elections & Voter Services division supports this recommendation to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballot this election year. Get more information here.


CenterPoint Can Help You Manage Gas Bills

CenterPoint Energy is offering payment plans and other assistance for residents and small businesses that may be struggling financially amid COVID-19. Since March, CenterPoint Energy has suspended natural gas disconnections for nonpayment and has temporarily waived late payment fees and interest on past due balances.

Paying your natural gas bills to the extent possible can avoid accumulating large unpaid balances, and CenterPoint staff are available to help you arrange a payment plan based on your specific circumstances. Call CenterPoint Energy Customer Service at 612-372-4727 or 800-245-2377 to get help. CenterPoint also has a dedicated webpage with information about various types of federal and county assistance available for customers who need help paying their natural gas bill.

In addition, the Minnesota Energy Assistance Program (EAP) recently received additional funding that allows even more Minnesota households to get help covering utility bills. To find your local EAP service provider, call 800-657-3710 and follow the prompts to enter your ZIP code, or reference this list of service providers.


Localized Flooding Expected Near Minnehaha Creek

The National Weather Service is forecasting up to two inches of rain across the Minnehaha Creek watershed starting Tuesday evening, driven mainly by the remnants of Tropical Storm Cristobal. The Minnehaha Creed Watershed District reports that water levels are already high in some areas across the watershed, and folks should be prepared for the potential of localized flooding. The creek is currently flowing around 290 cubic feet per second, making it unsafe for paddling, and this week’s rain could push the flow past 500 cubic feet per second. Ideal flow for padding is between 75 and 150 cubic feet per second. Flows above that threshold can make it tougher to react to branches, downed trees, and other obstacles in the creek. City crews are working to remove debris from the creek as they are able. Get more information on creek conditions here.


Staying Engaged

I am grateful for the 200-plus Ward 11 neighbors who attended my most recent Community Conversation in the wake of George Floyd’s murder. I recognize the need for additional discussions and understand the interest in this topic far outmatches my typical community events. Because we are not able to meet in person, my office is working on scheduling more virtual meetings in the near future that have the technical capability to accommodate a large group in a way that feels constructive for all involved. I will share more details on plans for Community Conversations as we work out the kinks — please stay tuned!

In addition, if you’re feeling motivated to get more involved in your community during this time, check out your local neighborhood organization for opportunities to get engaged:


Wash your hands and cover your face!

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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City of Minneapolis: Protecting your family and your home

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Protecting your family and your home

Stay inside. Experts agree this is the safest place for you and your family. Calling 911 continues to be the best way to report unlawful activity as it connects directly with dispatchers. If you feel additional measures are needed to protect you, your family and your belongings use these recommendations:

  • Lock your doors and windows.
  • Leave all lights on.
  • Keep watch from the second floor of the building.
  • Put away your trash, recycling, and organics carts, lawn bags, lawn signs and other items that are not secured.
  • Lock up or secure your flammables such as cans or containers of gasoline, propane, kerosene, diesel fuel. It is not safe to leave flammable fluids or materials on the porch, in the yard, or in unlocked garages or sheds.
  • Place your vehicles inside a locked garage if possible.
  • Chain up dumpsters and drench them with water.
  • If strangers are approaching make noise with whistles, noisemakers, or by banging on pots and pans so they know the home is occupied.
  • Pull hoses out for easy access and turn them on.
  • Fill buckets of water.
  • Know your vulnerable neighbors and provide them assistance.
  • Identify medically trained people on your block.
  • Ask people what neighborhood they live in.
  • Get license plate numbers of suspicious vehicles.
  • Charge phones and portable power banks in case the power goes out.
  • Pack a bag and have a plan to leave if you feel your residence has become unsafe:
    • Identify a safe place you can go and stay. This may be the home of family or friends.
    • Identify how can communicate with your loved ones. This should include a location to meet if cell service is interrupted.
    • Pack items you will need while you are away. Be sure to include medications.
    • Plan several routes to your safe place and avoid areas of large crowds. Write them down. GPS may not be available.

Calling 911

Call 911 to report any situation that requires police, the fire department or an ambulance. If you get a busy signal, please continue to call until you get through to dispatch.

When 911 calls are made, they are assigned to first responders by a 911 dispatcher based on the severity of the situation. Be prepared to answer the dispatcher’s questions, which may include:

  • The location of the emergency, including the street address.
  • The phone number you are calling from.
  • The nature of the emergency.
  • Details about the emergency, such as a physical description of a person who may have committed a crime, a description of any fire that may be burning, or a description of injuries or symptoms being experienced by a person having a medical emergency.

Remember, the dispatcher’s questions are important to get the right kind of help to you quickly. Be prepared to follow any instructions the dispatcher gives you, such as instructions to aid someone who needs first aid or CPR. Do not hang up until the dispatcher instructs you to do so.

For some calls, you may be contacted by phone instead of a squad response, or you may be encouraged to call back at another time.

All 911 calls that require a fire or emergency medical response are entered. When a call comes in that requires an emergency medical services response, EMS resources are dispatched by Hennepin EMS or North Memorial dispatch. When the Fire Department or emergency medical services are responding with police, they will stage at a safe location until police have determined the scene is safe.

If the Fire Department is not on site, you can use hoses or buckets of water to put out flames. Do not use fire hydrants. They are a critical resource for the Minneapolis Fire Department. Any interference with the fire hydrants negatively impacts the Fire Department’s ability to respond to fires across the City.

Protecting your commercial property

Businesses and commercial property owners have asked for guidance on protecting private property. While there are not official City regulations for securing private property, here are some tips:

  • Secure the property, such as removing cash drawers and boarding windows.
  • Remove flammable items such as gas and propane tanks.
  • Chain up dumpsters and drench them in water.
  • Put away and secure dumpsters and recycling carts.
  • If you choose to stay at your business or property, please avoid confrontations.
  • Plan a secondary exit in the event of a confrontation and leave the area. Do not engage with anyone breaking in or threatening you. Plan how to connect with loved ones once in a location of safety. Choosing to stay and defend your business property puts yourself, those you encounter, and the general public in danger.

Responding to damaged property

Owners of the damaged properties in Minneapolis can take the action to secure or remove a hazard without checking with our City’s Construction Code Services department (the code allows for emergency action to take place). In most cases, removing hazards or boarding openings will not require a permit. It is in the best interest for Minneapolis residents that the owners take the responsibility to clean up and secure their property. Owners may also hire a contractor to help safeguard a hazardous situation if they choose.

Ward 11 Bulletin: Council Member Jeremy Schroeder

Jeremy schroeder

jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov

(612) 673-2211

Ward 11 Neighbors,

I am relieved that last night was relatively peaceful and I am hoping for an even calmer evening ahead. This has been an overwhelmingly sad and disturbing past week, and I am so grateful to see our community’s compassionate response. Neighbors are coming together to support one another and to help areas of our city most affected by this unrest. Folks are finding ways to help and coming up with creative new ways to do so. Seeing all this gives me so much hope and certainty that we will be stronger on the other side of this, and I hope you are all feeling that too.

Governor Walz has extended our curfew but with more limited hours – tonight and tomorrow night, we must remain at home between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m. with exceptions for individuals going to and from work, those fleeing dangerous situations, journalists, and select others listed in his order. I continue to urge you to please follow this directive. It’s one of the most helpful and safest things you can do. Before the curfew takes effect tonight, check in with your neighbors and loved ones. The National Guard will still be present in Minneapolis. There are no plans for highway closures.

Please be careful about sharing unconfirmed reports of safety issues. State officials said this morning that there has been disinformation spreading, causing alarm within our communities. I ask you to be as vigilant about what you share as you are in observing your community in the first place. Additionally, the Minneapolis Police Department shared this evening that they asked residents to check their property for harmful objects that may be have been left by uninvited people. Propane tanks, bottles filled with gasoline & other substances have been reported. They say there are no credible threats against private residences, and this is only a safety check.

I asked for and received guidance today that folks with information about suspicious activities, such as a vehicle circling without a license plate, should call the MPD tip line at 612-692-8477. If you see suspicious activity that poses an immediate threat, call 911. If you experience a delay, please continue to call and it will be answered. Call volumes have been exceptionally high to each of these numbers, and I continue to ask City leadership for action to ensure our system is available and responsive to requests coming in.

The City has created this guide with tips on keeping your home and neighborhood safe, and for when to use 911. In addition, a group of South Minneapolis neighbors put together a list of tips for non-Black neighbors and have asked they be shared to ensure community response to our current situation does not cause more harm. Here’s what these community members advise, in their own words:

  • Doorknock your block and introduce yourself. Go to every house. The goal is to be known to all of your neighbors, not just those who were invited to organize.
  • Provide your contact info and your house number. Make sure your block is well connected. If giving out your contact info to known neighbors makes you nervous, please question why you want to do community watch. If neighbors of color don’t share back, don’t be suspicious. You haven’t earned their trust. Ask if they have folks nearby to connect with and trust their answer.
  • Be present and visible as a neighbor. If you have a porch, a stoop, or a big street-facing window, try to be visible several times per hour. Keep your lights on. Bad actors are less likely to come into a neighborhood that is present and active. Keep eyes on houses that are unable to do this themselves.
  • Disarm folks by engaging them. If you see someone you don’t recognize, say something simple like “Hey – you good?” Engage rather than attempting to scare, threaten, or make assumptions by reporting them. They might just be trying to get home.
  • Document what you observe, but only report when something actually happens. The goal of community watch is to promote safety, not to recreate police surveillance and targeting. That first step is visibility and presence. The second is sharing information. Only report when and what has actually happened that poses a credible threat. Try to only share information that you’ve witnessed, or name the source if it’s second-hand. Try not to create panic by making judgments of what “seems suspicious.”
  • Send direct, plain language updates in one message. Provide only the factual information in a useful way: “Red Chevy truck, plates XXX-123, slowly headed south on Nicollet from 24th Street, 3 white men inside flashing automatic rifles. 12:31AM” That’s it. That’s the update. If there were no automatic rifles in that update, is it still a threat? Interrogate why or why not.

It has been challenging to get confirmed, real-time information about potential safety threats in our area. Part of that is the nature of a crisis like the one we’re in – our systems were not prepared for something like what we’ve experienced in recent days and the situation evolves by the day, by the hour, and sometimes even by the minute. To be clear, this is an explanation, not an excuse. I share frustrations about it. My office is in frequent contact with City leadership and the incident command team to try to get the most accurate and complete information, and to ensure there’s an appropriate response to concerns in Ward 11. My office has also asked for close coordination between City communications and others, like the Minneapolis Police, to ensure that any information going out on official channels – much of which I am passing along to you – is vetted and verified to the extent possible. I encourage you to follow the City’s official Twitter account and official Facebook page for updates.

I’m so happy to see many Ward 11 neighbors are joining clean-up efforts. However, please do not enter any damaged buildings. It’s very dangerous to do so. The City is blocking sidewalks to keep people away from damaged buildings and is working with property owners to secure these buildings and get emergency demolitions started as quickly as possible. City crews continue work as fast as they can to help clean up streets, get traffic lights operational, and support residents’ volunteer clean-up efforts.

Also in the spirit of helping out, the generosity of this community has left food donation sites across the City have with an incredible amount of donations – I saw this firsthand when I helped with community response efforts at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church near the Third Precinct over the weekend. With such massive support, these organizations are in many cases struggling to process all the food donations. For now, the best way to help is through financial donations to local food shelves or nonprofit organizations you trust. The City has put together this resource to help guide you, if you wish to contribute. In addition, you can support affected East Lake Street businesses at this link. Finally, if you are in need of food assistance, the City has a list of local food shelves available here.

Aside from emergency response, the City is also working hard to continue providing essential services to our community. Garbage and recycling service resumed today, June 1. Crews are returning to properties whose collection was postponed last week due to safety concerns to empty those carts and then resume the normal collection schedule. Please have your carts out by 6 a.m. for pickup. You can pull them back by 4 p.m. If your carts weren’t emptied, crews will pick up extra materials on your regularly scheduled collection day this week. Find service updates here.

I appreciate how much I’ve heard from Ward 11 neighbors over the past week. I am grateful for each and every one of you who has taken the time to share your thoughts, feelings, ideas, and outrage with me. I appreciate your patience as my office continues to work our way through all the inquiries received and I intend to respond to all of them. As I’ve mentioned before, our voicemail system has logged thousands of messages from folks across the country, so it is best to use email to reach me at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov for the time being. We are working on sorting this out.

Last but not least, if you are out in the community or gathering with neighbors, please remember that we are still facing the COVID-19 pandemic and take appropriate precautions. Wear a mask and keep six feet between you and others, and wash your hands frequently.

In solidarity and community,

Jeremy

Please stay home and stay safe!

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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