Category Archives: Neighborhood News

Ward 8 Update: City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Hello Neighbors,

August 2020 represents the 55th Anniversary of the passage of the 1965 Voters Right Act. Today, I co-authored a honorary resolution, joining several City Councils’ around the country highlighting this momentous and quite frankly solemn legislation that finally gave African Americans full access to the ballot box. It is even more poignant to offer this resolution in light of the passing of Voters/Civil Rights icon Congressman John Robert Lewis. This resolution reminds us that the most basic tenet of American citizenship cannot be taken for granted. It is a right that has been bought and paid for with blood and sweat, and it is not only Black Americans who have had to fight for the right to vote, 2020 also is the 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage. If voting was not important it would not be such a struggle to keep people from the polls. The really sad part is that most eligible people in our country don’t vote. We cannot afford for that to be a reality in 2020, the only way to ensure that we overcome the voter suppression that is being employed to limit voter turnout is to show up to the polls en masse, whether you vote by mail, or in person, we must show up, our very democracy depends on it.

I look forward to seeing many of you (virtually) on Wednesday August 5th to discuss public safety, the proposed charter amendment and ways to build community to keep us all safe during these difficult and trying times.

Stay safe and wear a mask, so that we can beat this virus.

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Join us for a Virtual Public Safety Town Hall hosted by Ward 8 CM Andrea Jenkins on Wednesday, Aug 5th at 4:30 pm

ward 8 update

This virtual town hall meeting is an opportunity to engage with Chief Arradondo about the status of MPD and its protocol for responding to gun shots and violent crime in the area and how we transition to other forms of response, particularly for nonviolent offenses and preventing violent crime, that don’t perpetuate further harm in our communities from MPD. We have invited the Director of our Office of Violence Prevention, Sasha Cotton, for this purpose. Sasha’s office is increasing its funding, capacity and work of violence interruption outreach workers.

When: Wednesday, Aug. 5th from 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm

How to Participate: Join this Virtual event on Wednesday, Aug. 5th from 4:30 pm via Microsoft Teams using the instructions below. You can join online or by phone.


35W@94 Downtown to Crosstown Construction updates

MnDOT Logo

Upcoming I-94 closures begin July 31

Starting at 10 p.m. Fri, July 31, eastbound I-94 will be closed between I-35W and Hwy 280. Ramps will start to close at 8 p.m. The freeway and ramps will reopen by 4 a.m. Mon, Aug. 3. Motorists can use the detour of northbound I-35W to southbound I-35E to eastbound I-94.

Beginning at 10 p.m. Fri, Aug. 7, westbound I-94 will be closed between Hwy 280 and I-35W through 4 a.m. Mon, Aug. 10. Ramps will start to close at 8 p.m.

In two weeks, beginning 10 p.m. Fri, Aug. 14, I-94 will be closed in both directions between I-394 and I-35W through 4 a.m. Mon, Aug. 17. Ramps will start to close at 8 p.m.

Crews will resurface I-94 between Nicollet Ave. and Hwy 280.

Please drive with care around construction work zones:

  • Slow down when approaching every work zone, then navigate through with care and caution
  • Stay alert; work zones constantly change
  • Watch for workers and slow moving equipment
  • Obey posted speed limits. Fine for a violation in a work zone is $300.
  • Minimize distractions behind the wheel
  • Be patient; expect delays, especially during peak travel times

All closures are weather permitting and subject to change.

Stay connected

For real-time travel information anywhere in Minnesota visit 511mn.org or dial 5-1-1.


Free COVID-19 testing events coming up Saturday, Aug. 1 and Saturday, Aug. 15

Minneapolis is scheduling free COVID-19 testing events Aug. 1 and 15 focused on the Latinx community. All are welcomed. The testing is available to people arriving on foot or by car.

Register onsite. Registration forms are available in English and Spanish. Spanish interpreters will be onsite. If you have medical insurance, please bring your insurance card.

Free COVID-19 testing focused on Latinx community members

10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1 Incarnation-Sagrado Corazon Church, 3817 Pleasant Ave. S.

10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 15 Incarnation-Sagrado Corazon Church, 3817 Pleasant Ave. S.

Testing for other communities

If you are unable to attend one of these testing events, you can use this directory to find a testing location near you.

Note: Once you’ve been tested for COVID-19, it’s important to self-isolate until you receive your test results to avoid infecting others in case you test positive. If your test is positive, the Minnesota Department of Health recommends staying home for at least 10 days and until you have at least 24 hours fever-free without using fever reducing medication.

covid-19 testing opportunities


Next steps for proposed charter amendment that would create new Department of Community Safety & Violence Prevention

city minneapolis banner

The Minneapolis Charter Commission has held three public hearings to gather feedback on a proposed charter amendment establishing a new Department of Community Safety & Violence Prevention authored by five City Council members. A decision on whether that proposal will be referred to voters at the Nov. 3 general election must be decided by Aug. 5 to meet statutory deadlines.

The proposed Department of Community Safety & Violence Prevention would have responsibility for “public safety services prioritizing a holistic, public health-oriented approach,” according to the proposed amendment. As a charter department, the director would be nominated by the mayor and approved by the City Council. The director would have non-law enforcement experience in community safety services, including but not limited to public health and/or restorative justice approaches.

The ordinance provides that the City may maintain a division of law enforcement services composed of licensed peace officers subject to the supervision of the Department of Community Safety & Violence Prevention.

The City Council voted June 26 to advance the proposal as a ballot measure to be considered by Minneapolis voters. Under State law, proposals to amend the City Charter must first be reviewed by the City Charter Commission. The Charter Commission has at least 60 days to complete its review and submit its recommendation to the City Council but it may take up to 150 days to complete its review. The statutory deadline for submitting questions on the Nov. 3 general election ballot is Friday, Aug. 21. If approved by voters, the changes would become effective May 1, 2021. A decision by the Charter Commission is anticipated at its regular meeting on Aug. 5.

The Charter Commission also held a public hearing on a separate proposed charter amendment  that proposed to eliminate minimum funding level requirements for the police force. That proposal was submitted by a Charter Commission member. At its meeting July 29, the Charter Commission voted not to submit that proposal to voters in November.

Today, the City Council voted to schedule a Adjourned City Council meeting to conduct a public hearing relating to the Community Safety and Violence Prevention charter amendment ordinance, to be submitted to the voters at the November General Election. The public hearing will take place Monday, Aug 10th at 10 am, more information will shared through our Legislative Information Management System (LIMS) calendar.

Learn more about the proposed charter amendment and submit feedback.


Drive Thru Ballot Drop Off service available at the Early Vote Center days leading up to election day

drive by voting graphic

Voters will be allowed to drop off their ballots—without leaving their cars—on Friday, August 7; Saturday, August 8; and Monday, August 10. The division of Election and Voter Services (EVS) is setting up a special drive-thru service in the parking lots outside their new headquarters at 980 E. Hennepin Avenue.

Given the uncertainties around return times on mailing in completed ballots, we’re encouraging voters to simply drive by and drop off their completed ballots—quick, easy, and safe (and socially distanced).

NOTE: Return times by USPS usually take a max of up to 10 days; however, this year, our tests of the postal delivery have shown anywhere from between 6 to 17 days for return delivery within Minneapolis. Given COVID and other challenges, our EVS team wanted to address this issue head-on by offering this additional service to voters.


State executive order suspending evictions extended until Aug. 12; rental assistance available through Hennepin County

The governor’s latest extension of the peacetime emergency means that the suspension of evictions and landlord-initiated lease terminations remains in place until Aug. 12.

This suspension will allow households to remain sheltered during the peacetime emergency. The executive order does not relieve a tenant’s obligation to pay rent.

While the eviction moratorium continues, housing providers can evict a tenant when the tenant violates a lease by endangering the safety of others, engaging in certain illegal activities, or significantly damaging property. Evictions can also proceed if the homeowner or their family member needs to move into the premises or if a writ of recovery was issued prior to March 24 at 5 p.m.

Emergency rental assistance

Hennepin County offers emergency rental assistance for residents with low incomes who have been financially harmed by COVID-19. Residents can learn more and apply at www.hennepin.us/rent-help and find more information here:


City Council approves changes to Minneapolis Homes programs in effort to close racial gaps in home ownership

city minneapolis banner

The City Council approved changes today to the City’s Minneapolis Homes programs that reflect a citywide strategy to create sustainable homeownership opportunities and make a meaningful impact to close the homeownership gap between white households and Black, Indigenous, People of Color and Immigrant (BIPOCI) households in Minneapolis.

Minneapolis Homes focuses on reducing property vacancy, creating new housing units and sustaining homeownership in the city by providing educational, financing and property opportunities to homebuyers, homeowners and developers.

Minneapolis Homes programs are changing significantly in response to market data and community feedback through a long-term affordability housing study led by the City and Grounded Solutions Network. Highlights of changes include:

  • Focusing on lower income households: All homebuyer programs are changing to focus on households that make less than $80,000 a year with meaningful pathways to provide sufficient subsidy for households making less than $60,000 or $40,000 a year. All City-owned land suitable for residential development will be reserved for creating affordable housing moving forward.
  • Diversifying the types of units funded: One- to 20-unit ownership projects throughout the city are eligible. Projects can be on City-owned land or privately-owned land. Acquisition, rehabilitation, down payment assistance, and new construction are all eligible activities.
  • More options for perpetual affordability: The City is launching its own model for perpetually affordable housing, which will sell homes at an affordable price and provide homeowners with a 2% rate of return annually in most market conditions. City of Lakes Community Land Trust partnerships and new perpetually affordable housing models will also be encouraged through City programs.

Learn more about Minneapolis Homes on the City’s website.


Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board parkways reopening to motor traffic

Minneapolis Park and Rec Board

All Minneapolis parkways closed to motor vehicle traffic and open to trail users will go back to allowing motor vehicle traffic by Wednesday, Aug. 5.

Schedule

  • East Bde Maka Ska Parkway: Thursday, July 30.
  • Cedar Lake, Lake Harriet, West Bde Maka Ska and West River Parkways: Barriers and traffic control will be removed starting Monday, Aug. 3.

The funds for parkway closures to allow more space for trail users to follow physical distancing practices and limit the spread of COVID-19 will be exhausted by Aug. 3.

Please continue to follow these safety guidelines to limit the spread of COVID-19 while using parks and trails:

  • Stay at least 6 feet from people not in your own household.
  • Do not use parks if you feel sick or have COVID-19 symptoms, including fever, body aches, coughing, nasal congestion, runny nose and sore throat.
  • Cover your cough with your elbow, don’t cough into your hands.
  • Wash your hands immediately before and after visiting a park or trail.

Note that most MPRB water fountains are not operational, and most MPRB restroom buildings remain closed.

Keep up to date with Park Board news here.


Department of Homeland Security issues memorandum restricting DACA program

homeland security info

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a new memorandum on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program. The memorandum represents a first step in changing DACA processing while the DHS decides how it will move forward after the June 2020 U.S. Supreme Court decision holding that the way the government terminated the DACA program was unlawful.

This memorandum instructs DHS personnel to:

  • Reject all pending and future first time requests for DACA and refund filing fees for new applications received.
  • Reject all pending and future requests for advance parole.
  • Cut the DACA renewal/work authorization validity period from two years to one year.
  • Make decisions to end or deny deferred action in the exercise of discretion.

It is important to note that this memorandum does not end the DACA program immediately. Nevertheless, as the memorandum firmly closes the door on the possibility of new DACA applicants, and for many other reasons, the memo is likely to result in renewed litigation.

Free legal services

In the Minneapolis area, 2.5% of the immigrant population (1,625 people) are DACA eligible. DACA and DACA-eligible residents who cannot afford a private attorney should know that there are competent free legal services available in the Twin Cities area.

Find a list of trusted immigration legal service providers here.

The Minneapolis Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs (OIRA), operating remotely, is also a resource for residents. Please contact OIRA at 612-394-6018 or oira@minneapolismn.gov or visit the OIRA web section on the City website.


Census Takers to Start Follow Up With Nonresponding Households in Select Locations

us census logo

The U.S. Census Bureau announced that it will begin following up with households in select areas that have not yet responded to the 2020 Census.

Starting August 6, census takers from the Minneapolis area census office will begin interviewing households in the city. The majority of census offices across the country will begin follow-up work on August 11. Learn more here.

Households can still respond now by completing and mailing back the paper questionnaire they received, by responding online at 2020census.gov, or by phone at 844-330-2020. Households can also respond online or by phone in one of 13 languages and find assistance in many more. Those that respond will not need to be visited to obtain their census response.

What Households Can Expect

The Census Bureau will provide face masks to census takers and requires that census takers wear a mask while conducting their work. They will follow CDC and local public health guidelines when they visit. Census takers must complete a virtual COVID-19 training on social distancing protocols and other health and safety guidance before beginning their work in neighborhoods.

Census takers are hired from local communities. All census takers speak English, and many are bilingual. If a census taker does not speak the householder’s language, the household may request a return visit from a census taker who does. Census takers will also have materials on hand to help identify the household’s language.

If no one is home when the census taker visits, they will leave a notice of their visit with information about how to respond online, by phone or by mail. People are encouraged to cooperate with census takers and ensure that everyone who was living in their household as of April 1, 2020, is counted.

How to Identify Census Takers

Census takers can be easily identified by a valid government ID badge with their photograph, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date on the badge. To confirm a census taker’s identity, the public may contact their regional census center to speak with a Census Bureau representative.

How are these Offices Selected for the Early Start to Deploying Census Takers?

Career Census Bureau operational leadership makes the decision on when and where area census offices will begin following up with households that have not yet responded to the 2020 Census. As part of the selection criteria, we ensured these offices offered a variety of situations to help roll out the systems. We also followed a thorough review of the operating status of a state, locality or tribal area; the key data that support that operating status as identified by federal, state and local guidance; and the ability of Census Bureau staff to safely resume operations, including the procurement of personal protective equipment.

About the 2020 Census

The U.S. Constitution mandates a census of the population every 10 years. The goal of the 2020 Census is to count everyone who lives in the United States on April 1, 2020 (Census Day). Census statistics are used to determine the number of seats each state holds in the U.S. House of Representatives and informs how billions of dollars in federal funds will be allocated by state, local and federal lawmakers annually for the next 10 years.

For more information, visit 2020census.gov.


National Night Out recommended date changes to Sept. 15 for 2020

city minneapolis banner

The Minneapolis recommended National Night Out date for 2020 is Tuesday, Sept. 15. Residents can find out if their block is already signed up by emailing crime.prevention@minneapolismn.gov. Registered block leaders received notices directly about closing their streets to hold their event, but a block without a block leader could still hold a COVID-19 safe event by spreading out across three or four yards to make enough space for physical distancing.

Event safety in a pandemic

A safe event during a pandemic follows guidelines from the Minneapolis Health DepartmentMinnesota Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • Events are outdoors.
  • People keep their masks on when they’re not eating or drinking.
  • People keep at least 6 feet from others not in their household.
  • Households bring their own food, beverages, utensils, tables and chairs.

National Night Out is an annual nationwide event that encourages residents to get out in the community, holding block parties and getting to know their neighbors to prevent crime. It’s a great way to promote community-police partnerships and enjoy a Minnesota summer evening surrounded by friends and family.

Find out more about National Night Out at www.minneapolismn.gov/nno.


Mark your calendars for CANDO’s ReImagine 38th St. events every Saturday Aug. 8 – Sept. 5 from 11 am to 5 pm

ReImagine 38th St.

Join the Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization (CANDO) for their ReImagine 38th St. Event series.

When: Every Saturday from 11 am to 5 pm  between Aug. 8th to Sept. 5th

Where: George Floyd’s Memorial – 3759 Chicago Ave, Minneapolis, MN, Minneapolis, MN 55407

More information can be found through CANDO’s Facebook Event link here: https://www.facebook.com/events/3795527157142345/.


Minneapolis youth leaders produce mental health videos to help peers navigate stressful times

youth congress discuses mental health issues

Youth leaders with the Minneapolis Youth Congress collaborated with Minneapolis School-Based Clinics on two new videos about anxiety given all of the stress so many young people in Minneapolis are coping with right now.

Watch the videos

The Minneapolis Youth Congress is made up of students in eighth through 12th grades. The group advises local leaders on issues impacting young people in Minneapolis.


Save the Date for the City’s 7th Annual Trans Equity Summit September 13 – 15

Trans equity Summit Save the Date

More information will be posted on the City’s Transgender Equity webpage as additional activities for the summit are finalized, stay tuned!


Everyone can work to reduce the spread of COVID-19

mask up mn graphic

We’re working hard to slow the spread of the coronavirus to save lives. Social exposures and contacts are increasing as more places open back up, and young adults now account for more than 50% of cases.

  • Wear masks when in public. 10-50% of virus carriers are asymptomatic, so they don’t even know they’re sick. Wearing masks helps control the virus and has been shown to lower COVID-19 spread.
  • Avoid enclosed spaces with groups of people, where the virus can linger in the air for long periods of time.
  • Get tested if you have cold or flu-like symptomsFind testing locations.
  • Stay 6 feet away from others who aren’t in your household.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or sleeve, or a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands afterwards.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom or before eating. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face – especially your eyes, nose and mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Do not go to “COVID parties” – Young adults face a real risk of significant illness and complications. They can also pass the virus along to family members and other people in the community.

Statewide mask mandate in effect

Minnesotans are required to wear a face covering in indoor businesses and indoor public settings. Researchers have advocated for masking, calling it a simple and effective step to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

The State regulation reinforces Mayor Jacob Frey’s emergency regulation requiring people in Minneapolis to wear cloth face masks or coverings when they are in an indoor place of public accommodation.

Businesses are not required to provide masks to customers or employees themselves, though employers shall be required to mandate the use of masks by their staff. Non-compliance should be reported through 311.

Watch and share this Minnesota Department of Health video.

For information and resources on the mask mandate, including frequently asked questions, visit mn.gov/COVID19.

Donate homemade face masks at Minneapolis fire stations for Mask Drive Mondays

Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday for Mask Drive Mondays. The City’s Health Department continues to get requests from the community for help securing masks and the donations make a big difference in meeting those needs.


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

Public hearing on Minneapolis Parks Ecological System Plan scheduled August 19

Please note this date supersedes publication notice of Aug. 5 previously published in the Star Tribune

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) will hold a public hearing on the Minneapolis Parks Ecological System Plan on Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020 at 6:30 pm during the regular Board of Commissioners meeting.

The Ecological System Plan will set a vision for making parks and public lands more friendly to the environment.

The MPRB is adhering to social distancing recommendations during the COVID-19 pandemic and all Board meetings are being held virtually. The public is encouraged to view the meeting from home and email comments on the plan to the Secretary to the Board at jringold@minneapolisparks.org before 3:30 pm on Aug. 19. Comments should be limited to approximately 300 words, which is similar to three minutes when they are read out loud by the Secretary at the Board meeting.

Although all commissioners will not be physically present, the Board Room at Mary Merrill MPRB Headquarters (2117 West River Road) is open to the public during Board meetings. Social distancing is encouraged.

To make an in-person comment, please call 612-230-6400 before 6 pm on Aug. 19 to sign up to speak at the meeting and be present in the Board Room at the Mary Merrill MPRB Headquarters, 2117 West River Road by 6:30 pm.

An updated version of the Ecological System Plan will be published to the project page (minneapolisparks.org/ecoplan) several days before the hearing, when the Board agenda is posted.

Button Visit Project Page

To learn more about this project and others, visit www.minneapolisparks.org/planning.

Draft design of Hiawatha Golf Course Property Master Plan opens for 45-day comment period

Check out draft master plan for the Hiawatha Golf Course Area and tell us what you think by September 15, 2020!

Today, Friday, July 31, 2020, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) published the draft Hiawatha Golf Course Area Master Plan for a 45-day public comment period ending Sept. 15, 2020.

The master plan document is available in hard copy format at the Hiawatha Golf Course clubhouse or digitally on the project page and linked below. Comments will be accepted primarily online due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Community members can share their thoughts through an online survey or by emailing Project Manager Tyler Pederson at tpederson@minneapolisparks.org.

Draft Master Plan

The Draft Hiawatha Golf Course Area Master Plan is a written and graphic document intended to guide capital improvements in the area over the next 20-30 years. The master plan document is a direct reflection of the input provided by the appointed Community Advisory Committee (CAC), which met 7 times between March 2018 and July 2019, and extensive additional community engagement. View the plan using the links below:

Executive Summary

Draft Master Plan

Comment via Online Survey

If you require printed materials, they can be mailed or delivered in a COVID-safe manner. Contact Project Manager Tyler Pederson at tpederson@minneapolisparks.org to make arrangements.


Plan Highlights

The plan pushes toward a balance of golf and other activities set in a landscape guided by water management. It necessarily bends toward ecology in its aspirations, recognizing that restoration of natural processes—which were significantly altered by Wirth’s dredging of Rice Lake—are a goal greater than those supporting human activities on the site. With ecology as the yardstick, choices are made that err on preservation, conservation, and restoration rather than expanded disturbance and new development. While many uses are described, its restoration of sustainable water patterns and recreation balanced in a new ecologically-driven landscape that forms the higher order goals inherent in the plan.

With the vision and guiding principles, the CAC’s prioritized design element recommendation, focus-session input, community survey input, and input from our collaborating partners, the recommended Hiawatha Golf Course Area Master Plan includes:

  • Relocating an improved and reduced pumping strategy at the site to protect nearby low basements from groundwater intrusion to the same degree they are protected today.
  • Re-utilizing pumped water for a variety of potential uses (e.g. irrigation, snow making, facility heating/cooling).
  • Improving water management at the site while providing opportunities to address flooding in the watershed to the north.
  • Improving water quality in Lake Hiawatha and Minnehaha Creek.
  • Creating a destination golf facility focused on learning the sport and increasing opportunities for new players, including a 9-hole golf course, driving range, and practice facilities.
  • Celebrating the history of Black golfers at the course and supporting and providing an introduction to golf for people of color.
  • Expanding access to the site with bicycle and pedestrian trails, a re-envisioned clubhouse area that welcomes the larger community, and other new community gathering spaces.
  • Restoring ecological function through the creation of wetlands, riparian and shoreline restorations, upland prairie restoration, and protecting existing wildlife habitat.
  • Creating a south Minneapolis winter recreation destination complementary to north Minneapolis’s Theodore Wirth Regional Park.
  • Developing nine experiences that tell the cultural and natural history through permanent elements and infrastructure, as well as through art, performance, community events, and ephemeral experiences. Experiences include:
    • Stormwater Terrace
    • Pumping as a Resource
    • All are Welcome
    • A Place to Learn
    • Island Respite
    • Telling our Story
    • A Connection to Water
    • Urban Nature
    • Celebrating Minnehaha Creek

Master Plan Schedule

Graphic showing timeline of Hiawatha Golf Course Property Master Plan

Summer 2020

  1. Draft Master Plan published for 45-day public comment period on July 31
  2. Draft Master Plan presented to Board of Commissioners (informal presentation, no vote)
  3. Public comments tabulated
  4. Master Plan finalized based on public comments
  5. Final Master Plan considered by Board of Commissioners

Fall 2020

  1. Public Hearing and consideration in MPRB Planning Committee
  2. Master Plan passed out of Planning Committee considered by full Board of Commissioners
  3. Master Plan approved by Board of Commissioners sent to the Met Council for review and approval
  4. Nokomis-Hiawatha Regional Park Master Plan is amended with Hiawatha Golf Course Property Master Plan

Additional Information

Last winter the MPRB published project updates about the following topics:

  1. CAC Priorities (posted Dec. 13, 2019)
  2. Groundwater Pumping (posted Dec. 20, 2019)
  3. Golf Course Layout (posted Feb. 14, 2020)
  4. Detailed Master Plan Process and Schedule (posted March 13, 2020)

Button Visit Project Page

To learn more about this project and others, visit www.minneapolisparks.org/planning.

About this project

The Hiawatha Golf Course Property Master Plan will guide water management strategies and future use of the golf course property in Nokomis-Hiawatha Regional Park.

Project Manager

Tyler Pederson

612-230-6418

tpederson@minneapolisparks.org

Park Information

612-230-6472

info@minneapolisparks.org

MN Relay System: 711

Parkways reopen to motor vehicles beginning August 3, with several construction-related exceptions

minneapolis park and recreation

News 

Parkways reopen to motor vehicles beginning August 3, with several construction-related exceptions

This is a reminder that all Minneapolis parkways closed to motor vehicle traffic and open to trail users will go back to allowing motor vehicle traffic beginning Monday, Aug. 3.

On Aug. 3, workers will begin removing barriers and other traffic control in place at Cedar Lake, Lake Harriet, West Bde Maka Ska and West River Parkways. Most parkways will be open to motor vehicle traffic by Wednesday, Aug. 5, with several construction-related exceptions.

West River Parkway will remain closed in three sections due to construction projects:

  • Between 4th Avenue North and the Stone Arch Bridge parking lot for the Water Works project. Trail traffic will be routed onto one lane of the parkway.
  • Between 13th and 22nd Avenues South for repairs to the 10th Avenue SE Bridge and Bridge #9, which serves the Dinkytown Greenway trail.
  • Between East 33rd and 36th Streets for a sewer improvement project.

Theodore Wirth Parkway is also closed between 29th Avenue North and Golden Valley Road for a road resurfacing project. Please follow posted detours and stay away from areas where construction work is happening.

In late March the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) began closing parkways or park roads adjacent to its most popular trails to allow more space for trail users to follow social distancing practices and limit the spread of COVID-19. Several adjustments were made throughout the spring and summer in response to parkway conditions and demand, as well as efficiently use funds allocated toward maintaining the closures.

At its May 6, 2020 meeting, MPRB Commissioners passed Resolution 2020-202, which granted MPRB Superintendent Al Bangoura authority to spend up to $250,000 on a series of parkway closures enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Those funds will be exhausted by Aug. 3.

Please continue to stay at least six feet apart from people not in your own household while using parks and trails. Other guidelines park users are asked to follow to limit the spread of COVID-19 while using parks and trails:

  • Bring a water bottle. Most MPRB water fountains are not operational.
  • Bring disinfectant wipes or hand sanitizer. Most MPRB restroom buildings remain closed.
  • Do not use parks if you feel sick or have COVID-19 symptoms, including fever, body aches, coughing, nasal congestion, runny nose and sore throat.
  • Cover your cough with your elbow, don’t cough into your hands.
  • Wash your hands immediately before and after visiting a park or trail.

Stay Updated

Visit minneapolisparks.org/coronavirus for more information on the MPRB’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Receive timely email updates by visiting minneapolisparks.org/subscribe, entering your email and selecting the “COVID-19” topic in the “News Updates” section.

Minnehaha Parkway Regional Trail Master Plan public comment period extended to August 17

Minnehaha Parkway Regional Trail Master Plan public comment period extended to August 17

Check out draft master plan for Minnehaha Creek and surrounding parkland and trails in Minneapolis and tell us what you think by August 17!

The public comment period for the Minnehaha Parkway Regional Trail Master Plan has been extended two weeks and will close Aug. 17.

The master plan document is available on the Minnehaha Parkway Regional Trail Master Plan project page and linked below. Comments will be accepted primarily online due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the current closure of all MPRB recreation centers. Community members can share their thoughts through an online survey or by emailing or calling the project manager listed below.


Draft Master Plan

The Draft Minnehaha Parkway Regional Trail Master Plan is a written and graphic document intended to guide capital improvements in the regional trail area over the next 20-30 years. The master plan document is a direct reflection of the recommendations of an appointed Community Advisory Committee (CAC), which met 12 times between June 2018 and February 2020, and extensive additional community engagement.

1 – Planning Framework [PDF]

2 – Creek History, Background, and Evolution [PDF]

3 – Existing Conditions [PDF]

4 – Input and Community Engagement [PDF]

5 – Master Plan [PDF]

6 – Interpretive Plan [PDF]

7 – Implementation [PDF]

Comment via Online Survey

If you require printed materials, they can be mailed or delivered in a COVID-safe manner. Contact Project Manager Adam Arvidson at 612-230-6470 or aarvidson@minneapolisparks.org to make arrangements.


Plan Highlights

The plan addresses many concerns and ideas discussed by the CAC and community members during nearly two years of community engagement:

Ecology and Water Management

Ecological enhancement, flood mitigation and stormwater management are at the heart of the plan. At full implementation the plan would:

  • Add 1.7 miles to the creek’s length within Minneapolis
  • Create numerous water-cleansing, habitat-enhancing wetlands and floodplain improvements
  • Turn the Lake Harriet tributary into an open, free flowing stream
  • Remove enough phosphorous to achieve City of Minneapolis and MPRB responsibility for phosphorous reduction in the Minnehaha Creek and Lake Hiawatha

Bike/Walk Safety

The plan envisions an improved environment for bicyclists and pedestrians while preserving continuous motorized vehicle traffic on the parkway road in both directions. Improvements are focused at key intersections:

  • Near Lynnhurst Park
  • 50th Street and Portland Avenue
  • Minnehaha Parkway and Bloomington Avenue
  • Minnehaha Parkway and Cedar Avenue

Recreation Improvements

Increased recreation opportunities are found throughout the plan:

  • New canoe/kayak launches (including ADA accessible options)
  • A new adventure play area under the Nicollet Avenue bridge
  • Bike skills and mountain bike parks near Bloomington Avenue and near 34th Avenue
  • A westward extension of bike and pedestrian trails from Lynnhurst Park to Morgan Avenue

Next Steps

  • The draft Master Plan public comment period is open until Aug. 17, 2020.
  • After the comment period closes, the Master Plan may be modified based on responses received during the comment period.
  • A public hearing on the Master Plan will be held at a regular meeting of the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board of Commissioners, likely this fall.
  • The Master Plan will be considered for adoption by the Board of Commissioners
  • After the plan is adopted, the MPRB will spend approximately $1 million in the corridor. Specific projects have not yet been determined.
Button Visit Project Page

To learn more about this project and others, visit www.minneapolisparks.org/planning.

About this project

The Minnehaha Parkway Regional Trail Master Plan will set a vision and priorities for future park improvements and management along the trail for the next 20-30 years.

Project Manager

Adam Arvidson

612-230-6470

aarvidson@minneapolisparks.org

Park Info

612-230-6400

info@minneapolisparks.org

Minnesota Relay System: 711

Ward 11 update from Jeremy Schroeder

Ward 11 Neighbors,

Below you’ll find the latest updates on key issues like COVID-19, public safety, and more. As always, you are always welcome to get in touch with me directly about issues that matter to you. If you have immediate questions about City services like garbage pick-up, potholes, parking violations, and more, please call 311 or use these online reporting tools for the most efficient service.


Apply for Your Mail-In Ballot Today!

Though polling locations will be open for the primary and general elections, COVID-19 is still a serious health threat and I continue to encourage you to vote early by mail to minimize person-to-person contact at polling places. All Minnesota voters can request mail-in ballots without giving a reason for the Aug. 11 primary and the Nov. 3 general election. To make sure you have enough time to receive your ballot and vote, the City’s Elections & Voter Services team recommends applying for your mail-in ballot at least 10 days before Election Day. We are just 14 days away from the primary, so take a few minutes and request your ballot today! So far, more than 2,000 Ward 11 voters have cast primary ballots by mail – let’s see if we can get that number even higher.

Your mail-in ballot comes with a postage-paid envelope to return it plus an I Voted sticker. For the primary, your ballot will count as long as it is postmarked on or before Election Day (Aug. 11) and is received in the mail no later than two days after Election Day (by Aug. 13). Nationally, there are reports of slower-than-usual mail delivery. To be on the safe side, send your ballot in as soon as possible. You can also return your ballot in person to the City’s Early Vote Center (980 E Hennepin Ave) or Hennepin County Government Center (300 S 6th St) by 3 p.m. on Aug. 11.

Get more information on voting by mail here.


City Council Adopts Revised 2020 Budget

On Friday, the City Council completed its revisions to the 2020 budget after the COVID-19 pandemic caused a $156 million revenue shortfall. My colleagues and I made a series of changes to the budget that will help keep the City fiscally sound as we continue to weather the COVID-19 crisis with limited federal assistance. These were tough but necessary choices. I take very seriously my responsibility to spend your tax dollars efficiently and to the benefit of our community. I’m grateful to community members who shared their perspective at multiple public hearings, via email, at my virtual community meetings, and in phone conversations.

The City Council started its COVID-19 budget revisions earlier this year by approving a hiring freeze – which we extended Friday through the end of this year – and wage freeze, as well as a pause on major planned purchases and a 15% reduction in contractual and professional services. In addition, many City employees agreed to take voluntary unpaid leave to help prevent permanent layoffs. Certain City workers will likely be required to take unpaid leave going forward, again to help prevent permanent cuts. These are big changes, but unfortunately only solved part of our even bigger budget problem.

To further close the gap, the Council on Friday finalized additional changes that you can find in full here. This came after Mayor Frey proposed his revisions earlier this month, some of which the City Council also approved. Our budget amendments prioritize funding for programs and initiatives that benefit the community by, for the most part, moving funding from programs and initiatives that can survive with less – many times due to impacts of COVID-19 – or were redundant within the City enterprise. There were a number of these duplicated efforts within the Minneapolis Police Department.

I would like to highlight the budget amendment that I co-authored alongside Council Member Steve Fletcher that eliminates redundancies in our communications processes. The amendment shifts personnel from a separate, independent MPD public information office to the existing City Communications Department. There will still be an employee whose job is providing timely, accurate information on public safety issues. The reality is, we need this change. We saw glaring problems with the status quo most recently when the official news release describing George Floyd’s death did not match what the world saw on video. The Star Tribune called the MPD news release “troubling misinformation.” We’ve caught discrepancies like this before. Rebuilding our public safety communications process is vital to rebuilding community trust in general. As we create this new system, accuracy, transparency, and accessibility are paramount – and my standards for all three will be high. That’s what the public is entitled to.

The City Council also approved an investment of $1.1 million in efforts within our Office of Violence Prevention, including proven models like Cure Violence. There has been some confusion about whether we are supporting armed community patrols, which is not the case.

Our process to build the 2021 budget will begin soon, in mid-August, when Mayor Frey outlines his proposed budget. This will follow our more typical schedule, with City Council approval expected in December. Between now and then, community members will have multiple opportunities to weigh in and my colleagues and I will discuss and debate revisions to the mayor’s proposal. I look forward to sharing information as it becomes available and hearing from Ward 11 community members along the way.


Get to Know Our Office of Violence Prevention

Violence prevention is important because it improves public safety and equity in our community. While we will need focused, accountable law enforcement to respond to crimes after they have occurred, we have a huge opportunity to make Minneapolis a better place to live by investing in strategies to reduce crime upfront rather than focusing on retroactively responding to crimes that have already occurred.

The City Council’s increased investment in violence prevention builds on a successful track record for this type of work in our community. The City’s Office of Violence Prevention was launched officially in 2018 to focus on addressing the root causes of violence, intervening at the first sign of risk, and leading healing in the aftermath of violence to expand on more than a decade of similar work within our Health Department. Our approach in Minneapolis has been a model for other cities across the U.S.

I encourage you to explore the Office of Violence Prevention’s new webpage that features a host of information on violence prevention in Minneapolis. Specifically, you might want to learn more about violence prevention initiatives already underway in our city.

The Office of Violence Prevention approaches its work with the following in mind:

  • Violence is not inevitable; as with other health conditions, we can prevent, treat, and heal from violence
  • Violence is rooted in social, economic, political, and cultural conditions that include but are not limited to racism, classism, inadequate economic opportunities, community disinvestment, poor housing conditions, and harmful norms around gender and masculinity.
  • Violence takes a disproportionate toll on communities of color and specific neighborhoods in Minneapolis, and violence prevention must include work to undo structural racism
  • Everyone has a role to play in creating communities that don’t include violence; it takes all of us to make our communities safe, healthy, hopeful, and thriving

I encourage you to offer your input through this brief survey to help inform City violence prevention priorities for the coming years. In addition, the Office of Violence Prevention is supporting a series of two-hour online trainings to promote racial trauma healing, resilience, and restorative justice for all who live, work, and play in Minneapolis. The trainings are designed to help participants understand various types of trauma and common responses to psychological trauma, the links between unhealed trauma and cycles of harm and violence, practices for increased racial healing and equity, and ways to apply resilience and restorative justice practices. The last of these trainings are pay-what-you-can, up to $30, and will be held Friday, July 31 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. You can register here.


Proposed Charter Changes Still Under Consideration

The Minneapolis Charter Commission continues it work to review and respond to the City Council’s unanimous decision to advance a provision that would allow voters to decide whether to create a new Department of Community Safety & Violence Prevention in our City Charter, which is essentially our constitution. The Commission, an appointed 15-member body, is required by state law to submit its recommendation on a proposed amendment before it can be printed on the ballot and presented to voters. State law sets a deadline of Aug. 21 to include any questions for voters on this November’s ballot.

The proposed amendment submitted by the City Council proposes adding a new Community Safety & Violence Prevention Department with a Division of Law Enforcement Services within the department. Check out my recent newsletter for more details on what the charter amendment would mean for our community. I believe this amendment is necessary to give us the tools we need to make changes that many community members are demanding, to ensure that all Minneapolis residents feel safe in our city. By allowing residents to vote on the amendment this year, policymakers will get the direction we need to move forward. If it passes, we will be able to deepen our engagement with the community build a public safety system that reflects the needs and preferences of neighbors. Without first changing the charter, we would be unable to make the structural improvements many, many Ward 11 residents are calling for. As I’ve said many times before, we will need trained, armed officers to respond to extreme, violent situations. However, it is critical that we right-size this part of our public safety system to meet the need – and to provide more targeted, supportive responses to the situations that don’t require this type of response. These other needs may include taking theft reports and mental health calls, to name just a couple.

The Charter Commission is also considering a proposed amendment from one of its members that would eliminate required staffing levels in the MPD. You can learn more about each proposal and the Charter Commission’s process here.


Ongoing Work to Transform Public Safety

There is a lot of work underway to improve and transform our public safety system to ensure it works for everyone in Minneapolis. It can be difficult to keep up with everything that’s happening, but the City has compiled a number of related resources on one centralized webpage. This resource includes information on the civil rights investigation that the Minnesota Department of Human Rights launched into the MPD, recent City Council actions, and how you can provide input, information, and ideas.


City Looks to Expand Shelter Space

The City Council last week preliminarily approved a package of roughly $8 million in federal COVID-19 response funding to expand shelter space for those experiencing homelessness. This funding would help create a women’s-specific year-round shelter in partnership with Hennepin County and a nonprofit service provider. It would also support a partnership with Catholic Charities to add shelter beds for medically frail people experiencing homelessness, alongside the County and state. The funding would also support a new emergency shelter designed to serve Native American people experiencing homelessness in partnership with the American Indian Community Development Corporation with funding from the City, County, and state. The City Council will consider formal approval of this action at our meeting this Friday.

In addition, the Park Board is now regulating encampments in parks through a new permit process which will allow up to 20 parks to hold temporary encampments with up to 25 tents each. These permits can be issued to a person or organization that agrees to be responsible for day-to-day oversight of an encampment. Within 48 hours of issuing such a permit, the Park Board would provide restrooms or portable toilets, hand-washing stations, and trash/recycling containers. Find more information on park encampments in general and the Park Board’s new permitting process here. Park Board staff will share updates with the Park Board’s elected commissioners on Sept. 15 that detail progress on moving encampment residents into shelter and housing suitable for winter conditions.

We continue to work with Hennepin County to help connect people experiencing homelessness to housing, shelter, and services. Our Health Department coordinates public health services at large encampments and City staff continue to evaluate ways to expand outreach and rapid rehousing services. Find more information on the City’s ongoing efforts here.


Statewide Mask Mandate Takes Effect

The City continues to track COVID-19 cases in Minneapolis based on data gathered by the Minnesota Department of Health.  It is still vitally important that we all cover our faces and practice physical distancing when around folks not in our households. Governor Walz over the weekend imposed a statewide mask mandate for indoor public spaces, mirroring the rule has been in effect in Minneapolis since this spring. Data show COVID-19 may have a high rate of transmission through respiratory droplets, particularly indoors, and that wearing a mask can reduce the risk of community spread. People who do not show signs of the virus can still spread it to others. To report noncompliance, call 311 or use the online reporting tool.

Help ensure everyone can stay safe by donating homemade masks every Monday between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at any Minneapolis fire station. Donated masks are distributed to those most in need, including food shelves, congregate living facilities, small corner stores, and shelters. Please keep six feet between yourself and others when you drop off masks. Fire stations are not able to take other donations at this time.


Resources for Families During COVID-19

Hennepin County continues to offer assistance to residents in need that can be used to cover this month’s rent or past-due rent from previous months. To qualify you must:

  • Rent anywhere in Hennepin County.
  • Have had household income below 50% of the area median income (about $46,550 for a three-person household) before COVID-19.
  • Lost income due to COVID-19 that has not been replaced by unemployment insurance or other emergency assistance.
  • Can’t afford housing costs this month.
  • Not currently receive Section 8 or other rental assistance.

Priority will be given to households with the lowest incomes and those not eligible for unemployment insurance. Learn more and apply for assistance here. If you do not have internet access or cannot complete the form in English call 612-302-3160.

Additionally, Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) will continue serving free meals to all children 18 and under through Friday, August 21. Families can pick-up food boxes at 50 schools and parks across Minneapolis, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To keep families and staff safe, sites offer contact-free pick-up. All youth are invited to participate in this program and do not need to be enrolled in MPS to receive food boxes. Youth, parents, or siblings can pick up one box for each child in their family, per week. Find more information, including pick-up locations and schedules, here.


Public Hearing: Heather’s Seeking Outdoor Seating

Heather’s, the restaurant which earlier this year filled the long-vacant former Mario’s property at 5201 Chicago Ave, is seeking City approval to expand their outdoor seating area. A public hearing is required on this application, which seeks to expand the outdoor portion of the restaurant and allow food and beer and wine to be served in that area. The outdoor area would also be pet friendly. Under the license requested, it would not have live entertainment. Heather’s is open Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Fridays from 7 a.m. to midnight, Saturdays from 9 a.m. to midnight, and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Information is available here.

To offer your input, you can email me at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov and/or Licensing Inspector Phil Schliesman at philip.schliesman@minneapolismn.gov. You can also testify at a virtual public hearing on Tuesday, Aug. 4 at 1:30 p.m. Sign up to participate in the public hearing here.


City Seeking Applicants for Workforce Advisory Board

Are you interested in workforce issues? Do you want to help ensure economic inclusion for all Minneapolis residents? Apply by this Friday, July 31 to serve on the Minneapolis Workforce Development Board, one of 16 boards across Minnesota that provides policy and program guidance for state workforce development activities. Members help guide local workforce development in our community, with a focus on creating equitable opportunities and supporting workforce development services like career training and job placement. The board’s work prioritizes high-demand occupations with family-sustaining wages. Learn more and apply here.


Pet Vaccinations Available Through Animal Care & Control

Many residents have grown to rely on the Minneapolis Animal Care and Control (MACC)’s annual vaccination clinics. Due to COVID-19, MACC was unable to hold two clinics this spring and has heard from pet owners about difficulties in getting their animals vaccinated at private clinics following closures and lack of appointments. Beginning the week of July 6, MACC will implement a new pilot program to provide clinic services by appointment only at the Minneapolis Animal Shelter (212 17 Ave N).

This service is open to Minneapolis residents only. Folks will need to show or purchase a current pet license. MACC will offer the following services:

  • Rabies vaccine for $20 (animals with prior proof of current rabies vaccination will be given a three-year rabies vaccine; all others will be provided a one-year vaccine)
  • Da2PP or PRC vaccine for $25
  • Microchip for $35

Appointments are available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. In order to maintain the health and safety of our staff and residents by ensuring social distancing, MACC cannot accommodate unscheduled appointments. Residents can sign up for services here or by calling 311. Getting animals vaccinated is an important public health and safety service, and MACC is doing its part to help the community during these difficult times.


Have You Taken the Census Yet?

Ward 11 neighborhoods have some of the highest census response rates in Minneapolis but we still have hundreds of households in our community that need to be counted. This is critical to getting the federal resources we need for schools, roads, and other public services. It also ensures our community is fully represented at all levels of government. If you haven’t taken the census yet, visit my2020census.gov and check it off your to-do list. It only takes about 10 minutes to complete the census online, or you can do it by phone. Learn more about why the census is so important here.


Wash your hands and cover your face!

DBA: Town Hall Tap  Purpose: To gather public opinion and solicit comments regarding the application from Town Hall Tap

Licenses and Consumer Services 350 S 5th Street, Room 1 City Hall Minneapolis, MN, 55415 612-673-2080 www.minneapolismn,gov Notice of Public Hearing 

All public hearings shall be conducted by telephonic or other electronic means to limit the potential spread of COVID-19, pursuant to Minn. Stat. 13D.021. 

DBA: Town Hall Tap 

Purpose: To gather public opinion and solicit comments regarding the application from Town Hall Tap for an On-Sale Liquor License, No Entertainment with Sunday Sales and Sidewalk Café. The business is also expanding into the space next door with additional seating for 50 patrons and an outdoor patio located on private property with seating for 61 patrons. The patio will be enclosed by an 8ft high privacy wall with no live entertainment. 

Date: July 30, 2020 

Time: 6:00 pm 

Place: Microsoft TEAMS virtual meeting: +1 612-276-6670, Conference ID: 805 600 203# 

Applicant’s Name (Legal Entity): Town Hall Tap, LLC 

Complete Address: 4810 Chicago Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55417 

Telephone Number: 612-767-7307 

Current License(s): On-Sale Wine with Strong Beer, No Entertainment and Sidewalk Café 

Requested License(s): On-Sale Liquor License, No Entertainment with Sunday Sales and Sidewalk Café 

Zoning District: AP/C1/PO 

Neighborhood and Ward: Field/ Ward 8 

Hours of Operation: Indoor: Monday- Friday 11a.m.-1a.m.; Saturday 10a.m.- 1a.m.; Sunday 10a.m.- 12a.m. Sidewalk Café: Sunday-Wednesday closes at 10p.m.; Thursday-Saturday closes at 11p.m. Patio: Monday- Saturday closes at 11p.m.; Sunday closes at 10p.m. 

Nature of Entertainment: No Live Entertainment: No entertainment other than the use of radio, television, electronically reproduced music and jukebox. The applicant intends to provide relaxing music indoors and outdoors. 

This application is subject to final approval of all ordinance requirements which may include zoning, health, criminal background, and financial reviews. You are invited to express your opinions and/or submit such in writing by contacting Inspector Lisa Chmelar at 612-673-3911 or lisa.chmelar@minneapolismn.gov

If you would like to participate in the public hearing by telephone using Microsoft TEAMS, please call: +1 612-276-6670 Minneapolis Conference ID: 805 600 203# 

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats, contact the Licenses and Consumer Services Division at 612-673-2080. People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service by calling 311 or 612-673-3000. TTY users call 612-673-2157. Information in Other Languages: Para asistencia 612-673-2700. Rau kev pab 612-673-2800. Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500. 

DBA/Trade Name: Town Hall Tap Date of Public Hearing: July 30, 2020 

Your Name: ______________________Your Address: ___________________________________ 

Comments:______________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ 

Signature: __________________________________________ Date: _______________________ 

You may return this response to: 

Division of Licenses and Consumer Services Room 1 City Hall 350 S 5th Street Minneapolis MN 55415 

BusinessLicenses@minneapolismn.gov 

Attn: Inspector Lisa Chmelar

Ward 8 Update from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Hello Neighbors,

I want to acknowledge these extraordinary challenging times. We are all seemingly living on the edge of uncertainty and varying levels of uncomfortableness. We have a serious uptick in violence, we have many of our neighbors sleeping in ours parks because they don’t have access to safe and affordable housing, and we are still in the throes of a global pandemic.

Today my colleagues and I, along with Mayor Frey had the unenviable responsibility of amending the 2020 budget to address the $158 million-dollar gap created by the response to the pandemic. While this work is never easy, I am proud that we were able to stick to our stated values to emphasize and demonstrate equity. We invested $1.1 million dollars in our Office of Violence Prevention to help address public safety. We increased funding for legal support to prevent evictions and we restored funding to youth programming that was proposed to cut be cut from Mayors proposal.

It is important to note that we were able dedicate $100,000 to begin the community engagement process to determine how best to memorialize that tragic murder of George Floyd and the events that followed. A part of this process will include community plans to determine how best to begin a partial reopening. The goal is to work with artists, healers and community groups to lead this process.

Additionally, I will be hosting a “Virtual Public Safety Town Hall” in the coming weeks, we will promote this event through neighborhood organizations, phone calls, the Ward 8 Facebook Page and e-newsletter. This meeting will be joined by Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo.

Stay Safe,

signature

City Council adopts revised 2020 City budget

city of minneapolis banner

The City Council has approved Mayor Jacob Frey’s revised 2020 City budget proposal that addresses roughly $156 million in projected revenue losses because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The mayor and City Council have trimmed the budget through a combination of spending freezes, use of cash reserves, program cuts and employee furloughs. The revised City budget is approximately $1.5 billion.

The first phase of the response to the economic impact of the pandemic included spending and hiring freezes that saved approximately $58 million. The revised budget plan adopted today includes plans to offset approximately $100 million in additional revenue losses.

As part of the Council’s budget markup process, approximately $1.1 million has been shifted from the Minneapolis Police Department to the Health Department for violence prevention efforts. In addition, the City added $100,000 to the budget to support initial community engagement in the co-creation of a vision for a permanent memorial for George Floyd.

The mayor will present a recommended 2021 City budget to the City Council later this summer. Learn more about the City budget at minneapolismn.gov/budget.

View Council members proposed amendments to the mayor’s revised budget proposal.


City leaders provide updates on response to homelessness, COVID-19 and ongoing recovery work

video clip of city leader press conference

City of Minneapolis leaders provided updates on the City’s response to the increase in homelessness, efforts to enforce COVID-19 safety protocols in bars and restaurants, and ongoing recovery/rebuilding work during a news conference July 22.

Watch the news conference.


Rental Assistance available through Hennepin County

hennepin county logo

Hennepin County has up to $15 million available to help low-income renters who can’t afford their housing costs due to COVID-19. Even though there is a temporary hold on evictions, rent is still due.

Folks may qualify for emergency assistance if they:

  • Rent anywhere in Hennepin County.
  • Had household income below 50% of the area median income (about $46,550 for a three-person household) before COVID-19.
  • Lost income due to COVID-19 that has not been replaced by unemployment insurance or other emergency assistance.
  • Can’t afford housing costs this month.
  • Are not currently receiving Section 8 or other rental assistance.

There is no deadline to apply. Priority will be given to households with the lowest incomes and those not eligible for unemployment insurance.

Apply

Residents can learn more and apply at www.hennepin.us/rent-help and find more information here:

If you do not have internet access or cannot complete the form in English call 612-302-3160.


Next steps for proposed charter amendment creating new Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention

city of minneapolis banner

The Minneapolis Charter Commission has held two public hearings to gather feedback on the proposed charter amendment establishing a new Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention authored by five City Council members.

The Minneapolis Charter Commission is also planning a public hearing 5 p.m. Monday, July 27 on a separate proposed charter amendment eliminating minimum funding level requirements for the police force. The proposal has been submitted by a Charter Commission member.

The proposed Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention would have responsibility for “public safety services prioritizing a holistic, public health-oriented approach,” according to the proposed charter amendment. As a charter department, the director would be nominated by the Mayor and approved by the City Council. The director would have non-law enforcement experience in community safety services, including but not limited to public health and/or restorative justice approaches.

The ordinance provides that the City may maintain a division of law enforcement services composed of licensed peace officers subject to the supervision of the Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention.

The City Council voted June 26 to advance the proposal as a ballot measure to be considered by Minneapolis voters. Under state law, the Charter Commission has at least 60 days to complete its review and submit its recommendation to the City Council. The statutory deadline for submitting questions on the Nov. 3 general election ballot is Friday, Aug. 21. If approved by voters, the changes would become effective May 1, 2021.

Learn more about the proposed charter amendment and submit feedback.


COVID-19 Testing Sites and Information available on the Minnesota Department of Health’s Website

covid-19 testing sites

Where can I get tested for COVID-19?

COVID-19 testing facilities are located across the state of Minnesota. To find the nearest testing location in your community, click on the MN COVID-19 Testing Locations web page. PLEASE NOTE: This site changes on a daily and sometimes hourly basis based on testing demand and supply availability across the United States. This website is updated regularly, but may not immediately reflect changes at a particular clinic throughout the day.

To view all Minneapolis testing locations refer to the MN Department of Health webpage for testing here. 

Is testing free?

Federal law requires health insurance plans to cover diagnostic and serological or antibody testing AT NO COST to patients. There may be charges associated with the visit to obtain the testing, but most health insurance companies in Minnesota have waived copays, coinsurance, and deductibles associated with these charges. Check with your insurance company for more details.

What should I do if I don’t have health insurance?

If you don’t have health insurance- you may be eligible for coverage. Contact Mnsure or the Minnesota Department of Human Services to learn more about coverage options.


35W@94 Downtown to Crosstown Construction Updates

mndot logo

Eastbound I-94 overnight closure July 26

MnDOT will need to move some barrier on I-94. To do this safely, they need an overnight closure of eastbound I-94. From 10 p.m. on Sun, July 26 through 5 a.m. Mon, July 27, eastbound I-94 will be closed between I-394 and I-35W.

Stay connected

For real-time travel information anywhere in Minnesota visit 511mn.org or dial 5-1-1.


Notice of Planning Commission Public Hearing to add a commemorative street name of George Perry Floyd Jr Place to Chicago Ave between 37th St E and 39th St E.

George floyd place sign

The City Planning Commission will meet on Monday, August 3, 2020, at 4:30 p.m. to consider designating a commemorative street name of “George Perry Floyd Jr Place” to Chicago Ave between 37th St E and 39th St E.

During the declared local public health emergency, Minneapolis has transitioned to an electronic format for its public meetings and hearings, authorized under Minn. Stat. Section 13D.021, to minimize the risk of exposure to or potential spread of COVID-19. The public may view the public hearing using the following options: Watch on Comcast Channel 14 or 799, CenturyLink Channel 8001 or 8501, or live on www.minneapolismn.gov/tv/citycounciltv.   

In accordance with the Zoning Code, all property owners within 350 feet of the subject property are notified of this public hearing.  The public may submit comments or participate by phone in the meeting by using the following website: www.minneapolismn.gov/meetings/index.htm.

If you have questions about the project, please contact the City staff person listed below.  If you would like to submit comments, you may submit them via the link above or by emailing:

Matt Hanan – 309 2nd Ave S #200, Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone (612) 673-3607 E-mail: Matt.Hanan@Minneapolismn.gov

Planning Department staff will issue a recommendation to the Planning Commission. After hearing from the public, the Planning Commission will make a determination based on required legal findings of fact. Please visit www.minneapolismn.gov/meetings/planning for the agenda with staff reports (web page will be updated by the end of the day Wednesday prior to the meeting date).

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please contact 612-673-3710. People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.


State Primary Election Tuesday, August 11; Polling places changing due to pandemic

your city your vote graphic

To help keep voters and Minneapolis residents safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, 50 of 125 polling places in Minneapolis are moving for the 2020 primary and general election. The changes will help protect people living in residential facilities and provide more space to keep voters a safe distance from elections staff and each other.

Of the 50 polling places being relocated, 16 were in senior homes, high-rises and other residential sites. Another 32 were in areas with limited space that would make it difficult for people to keep at least 6 feet from others inside. Two were moved due to on-site construction.

Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services partnered with Minneapolis Public Schools and the Minneapolis Park & Recreation board to find new locations for voting during the pandemic. In total, 94 buildings will be open for the Aug. 11 primary and Nov. 3 general elections, with 35 in schools and 22 in park buildings. Some buildings will have more than one voting precinct.

Registered voters will receive a postcard in the mail indicating their new polling locations. The Minnesota Secretary of State’s polling place finder can also provide voters their new polling places. These locations will be the same for the Aug. 11 primary and Nov. 3 general elections. All voters choosing to vote in person on Election Day should check the online polling place finder or call 311 to verify their polling place.

Keep safe and vote by mail

Though polling locations will be open for the primary and general elections, the City encourages voting early by mail to minimize direct contact with others. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages voting early by mail, and Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services supports this and other CDC and Minnesota Department of Health recommendations to make sure all voters in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballots this election year.

More information on how to vote by mail is available at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail.

For those going to the polls on Election Day, we will have COVID-19 protocols in place to provide a safe and healthy environment for all voters and election judges. The polling place protocols follow best practices from the Minnesota Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, the protocols follow Emergency Regulation 2020-12, which requires people in Minneapolis to wear a cloth face covering when they are in an indoor public space.

Voting at the Early Vote Center

The Early Vote Center, 980 E. Hennepin Ave., makes early voting in person more convenient for Minneapolis voters. It’s especially helpful to people who need language support or other special accommodations, such as curbside voting. And while we are in a pandemic, voting early can help people avoid lines and crowds at polling places on the day of the election.

The Early Vote Center’s hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. The center will also have Saturday hours for the last two weekends before the primary. All early voting hours are posted on the Elections & Voter Services website: vote.minneapolismn.gov/events.


The Division of Race & Equity’s BIPOC Trans and Gender Nonconforming (TGNC) Data Narrative Phase 1 RFP is open until Friday, July 31

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The Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) transgender, gender non-conforming (TGNC) Data & Narrative Project will acquire data and narratives that have not been recorded on this scale due to erasure of the community. The Project attempts to respond to demands for data and narratives about BIPOC TGNC folk to shape policymaking, organizing, and culture in support of the community. The Project will center Black Trans Women & Femmes as the most marginalized and leading organizers in transgender/gender non-conforming equity. The data and narratives drawn from the Project will provide another opportunity for agencies and organizers to center and support BIPOC TGNC people in different areas of work. The data will strengthen awareness about the status, conditions, and experiences of the local BIPOC TGNC community in terms of equity relative to the following:

  • Housing
  • Health Care
  • Employment
  • Food
  • Transportation
  • Disability
  • Sex Work
  • Migrant Status
  • Policing/Incarceration
  • Community Safety
  • Physical/Mental Health
  • Education

Often, data about TGNC people is conflated which fails to recognize the ways in which intersectionality affects the community. The Project intends to emphasize the intersecting experiences of the BIPOC TGNC community regarding marginalization and inequities. Furthermore, the Project hopes to collect enough data to be able to disaggregate data further – separating by race, ability, gender, etc.  The disaggregated data about BIPOC TGNC folks reinforces the demand to advance equity in support of the most vulnerable groups in the community.

The data is also an opportunity to show the importance of already existing leadership and organizing that supports BIPOC TGNC folk. Leaders and organizers center the experiences and narratives of BIPOC TGNC folk to shape work and efforts in support of the community. The data collected as part of the narratives will also push agencies to collaborate with BIPOC TGNC leaders and organizers already doing work to advance equity in the community.

The full RFP can be found on our website. Applications will be accepted through Friday, July 31, 2020. Questions around the RFP can be directed to track.trachtenberg@minneapolismn.gov.


Minneapolis Foundation Funding Opportunity: OneMPLS Rebuild Grants

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The Minneapolis Foundation’s next round of OneMPLS grants will provide flexible resources to organizations that support BIPOC-led Minneapolis businesses that were economically impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, and which are now facing additional financial distress as a result of the civic unrest following the killing of George Floyd. These grants will support work performed in the next 1-6 months by Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs), technical service providers, and collaboratives that serve businesses in the Lake Street, North Minneapolis, and University Avenue areas of Minneapolis.

Purpose

Funds will be deployed to support immediate and short-term (1-6 months) strategies to assist Minneapolis BIPOC businesses as they navigate challenges related to financial crisis, damage, and destruction due to public unrest after the killing of George Floyd and longstanding injustice in Minneapolis.

The Minneapolis Foundation will fund:

    • Direct financial support for the immediate relief, transition, or closure of BIPOC-led businesses.
    • Technical assistance, immediate support, legal consultation, and protection from predatory practices.
    • Organizational capacity of intermediaries and technical assistance providers as they manage the added financial and physical challenges of supporting businesses impacted by the pandemic.

Questions? The Minneapolis Foundation is hosting a Zoom meeting at 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 30 to share information and answer questions about this grant round.

Register for the grant information session >>


City reimagining public access television with new vendor BFRESH Productions

b fresh productions

The City is transforming its public access television services. As media consumption has evolved, it has become clear that the City should transition from a public access programming approach to explore new initiatives that support local storytelling and content creation and encourage community engagement.

The City has contracted with BFRESH Productions to reimagine public access television as community media. BFRESH will manage the City’s three public access channels and provide community media services to Minneapolis residents. Community media content will continue to air on Comcast channels 16, 17 and 75 and CenturyLink channels 8007, 8008 and 8009. Community media services and cablecasting will begin in July 2020.

Transitioning from public access to a community media approach will open new doors for public collaboration. This new vision seeks to:

  • Take a multimedia approach to developing, creating and distributing stories and content.
  • Provide the training skills necessary for residents to compete in the current and future workforce.
  • Create additional opportunities to build connections between communities.
  • Provide resources for hyperlocal media organizations to tell their stories.

BFRESH will build on the City’s commitment of promoting a local focus; diversity of voice; and independent, non-commercial media content created for and by the people of Minneapolis. BFRESH will provide community media services such as training, access to production equipment, space and provide and manage free airtime on the City’s public access channels. Programming for the channels will consist of community-produced TV shows, shorts, films and other hyperlocal storytelling content.

About BFRESH Productions 

BFRESH Productions is a media production and communications agency based in north Minneapolis. The collective experience of its diverse, multi-generational team spans broadcast, media training, journalism, program management, data insight, technology and public access television.

Share your feedback

BFRESH invites the community to provide feedback by taking a survey as BFRESH gathers data and opportunities to best serve Minneapolis residents. Ideas for content and partnerships in the evolving community media access model are encouraged. BFRESH will also host several virtual conversations in July and August for residents to help shape the future of community media in Minneapolis.

To contact BFRESH Productions, email info@bfreshproductions.com.


Gov. Walz issues statewide mask mandate for indoor businesses, public settings

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Gov. Tim Walz has signed an executive order requiring Minnesotans to wear a face covering in indoor businesses and indoor public settings. Researchers have advocated for masking, calling it a simple and effective step to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The mandate goes into effect on ​Saturday, July 25.

Individuals with a medical condition, mental health condition, or disability that makes it unreasonable for the individual to maintain a face covering are exempt from the order. Children ages 5 and younger are also exempt. Children under 2 should never wear a face covering due to the risk of suffocation.

For information and resources on the mask mandate, including frequently asked questions, visit mn.gov/COVID19.


Use online forms for non-emergency requests to 311

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When 311 is closed, use our online forms to file non-emergency requests:


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

Ward 11 Update, Jeremy Schroeder

Ward 11 Neighbors,

Below you’ll find the latest updates on key issues like public safety, COVID-19, and more. As always, you are always welcome to get in touch with me directly about issues that matter to you. If you have immediate questions about City services like garbage pick-up, potholes, parking violations, and more, please call 311 or use these online reporting tools for the most efficient service.


City Council Continues Revising the 2020 Budget

The City Council is set to vote this Friday, July 24 on a revised 2020 budget to account for a $156 million revenue shortfall brought on by COVID-19. For context, that’s about 10% of our total budget. Last week, Mayor Frey week outlined proposed cuts including reduced investments in several programs and some facilities in addition to the use of cash reserves to balance the budget. Then, my City Council colleagues and I on Friday had a lengthy discussion on those proposed changes and approved a series of our own budget changes.

In addition, the City Council has already pursued a hiring freeze and wage freeze, paused major planned purchases, and reduced contractual and professional services by 15%. Many City employees are considering taking voluntary unpaid leave to help prevent permanent layoffs.

Community members will have another chance to weigh in on revisions to this year’s budget at our second and final public hearing this Wednesday, July 22 at 10 a.m. See how to participate here. You can also submit written comments to the public record by emailing councilcomment@minneapolismn.gov and/or can email me at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov.

Beginning in mid-August, City policymakers will begin our work to build a budget for 2021. That work will continue through the rest of this year and will include additional opportunities for public input.


Weigh In on Proposed Charter Amendment This Week

Late last month, the City Council unanimously initiated a process to allow voters to decide whether to adopt a proposed charter amendment whether to create a new Department of Community Safety & Violence Prevention. You can find the language for this proposed ballot measure here. The Charter is essentially the City’s constitution, and this change (if approved by a majority of voters) would allow much more flexibility in how we ensure public safety for everyone in our City. The charter amendment would not eliminate law enforcement. Instead, this measure is needed so that we can incorporate strategies in addition to traditional policing. Check out my recent newsletter for more details on what the charter amendment would mean for our community.

More than 200 community members registered to speak at last week’s initial public hearing before the Charter Commission. The Commission will hold a second and final public hearing on the proposed charter amendment this Tuesday, July 21 at 6 p.m. If you’d like to participate in this week’s public hearing, sign up here. If you prefer, you can submit written comments to the Charter Commission. Please note that any comments you submit to any public body or official become part of the public record.

The question before the Charter Commission is whether the proposed measure would fit within the scope of the charter. The Commission must issue a nonbinding recommendation before any ballot measure is put to voters. You can learn more about the Charter Commission and its process here. It is my strong belief that Minneapolis voters – not an unelected commission – should decide how our city approaches public safety going forward, whether we pursue a new department or stick with something closer to the status quo. Minneapolis residents deserve this democratic process.

Find information about the City’s actions to transform public safety, as well as the Minnesota Department of Human Rights’ civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department, the ongoing work of our Office of Violence Prevention, and more here.


How to Stay Updated on City Business

At a time when many community members are eager to stay informed about City business, I’d like to again remind you that our Legislative Information Management System – or LIMS for short – includes a searchable database and calendar with up-to-date City Council agendas, official actions, and more. It’s also a great resource to find out about upcoming public hearings and public meetings related to the City Council and the City’s many appointed boards and commissions. If you’re interested in tracking City business, I encourage you to keep an eye on LIMS and subscribe to email updates on committees and topics that interest you.

You can tune into City Council meetings (and select others) live via City Council TV, or they are also broadcast on Comcast channels 14 and 799 and CenturyLink channels 8001 or 8501. Access archived broadcast recordings for on-demand replays via the City’s YouTube page. Upcoming Charter Commission meetings and Budget Committee meetings will be broadcast live on City Council TV.


City Declares Racism a Public Health Emergency

The City Council on Friday approved a resolution declaring racism a public health emergency in the City of Minneapolis and committed to a series of action steps to dedicate more resources to racial equity work.

The resolution notes that “racism in all its forms causes persistent discrimination and disparate outcomes in many areas of life, including housing, education, health, employment, public safety and criminal justice; exacerbated further by the COVID-19 pandemic crisis” and “a multitude of studies connect racism to inequitable health outcomes for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), including cancer, coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high infant and maternal mortality rates demonstrating that racism is the root cause of social determinants of health.”

The resolution also highlights studies indicating that Black people are three times more likely to be killed by police as white people in this country and the killings of unarmed Black men are associated with an increase in depression and emotional issues for Black people. It also notes that Minneapolis has some of the “starkest racial inequities in the country” and ranks as one of the worst regions for racial gaps in home ownership, poverty, median income and obtaining a high school diploma.

The resolution commits the City Council and mayor to recognize the “severe impact of racism on the wellbeing of residents and the city overall” and to allocate funding, staff and resources to “actively engage in racial equity in order to name, reverse, and repair the harm done to BIPOC.” Find more information on the resolution and our specific action steps here.


Tracking COVID-19 in Minneapolis

The City continues to track COVID-19 cases in Minneapolis based on data gathered by the Minnesota Department of Health, and with concerns nationwide about continued spread of the virus it’s important we all continue to do what we can to limit its impact in our community. Contact between people is increasing as more places open back up, and we need to remain careful about how and when we interact with others. Importantly, young adults now account for more than 50% of cases. I offered some health and safety tips last week but want to share them again:

  • Wear masks when in public. Up to 50% of virus carriers are asymptomatic, so they don’t even know they’re sick. Wearing masks helps control the virus and has been shown to lower COVID-19 spread.
  • Avoid enclosed spaces with groups of people, where the virus can linger in the air for long periods of time.
  • Get tested if you have cold or flu-like symptoms. Find testing locations.
  • Stay 6 feet away from others.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or sleeve, or a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands afterwards.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom or before eating. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face – especially your eyes, nose and mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Do not go to “COVID parties.” Young adults face a real risk of significant illness and complications. They can also pass the virus along to family members and other people in the community.

To help ensure everyone can stay as safe as possible, the City is still coordinating homemade mask donations. Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday. The City’s Health Department continues to get requests from the community for help securing masks and these donations make a big difference in meeting those needs.


Request Your Mail-in Ballot Today

Another way you can help limit the risk of spreading COVID-19 is to request your mail-in ballot for this year’s Aug. 11 primary and Nov. 3 general election. All Minnesota voters can sign up here to get ballots by mail — you don’t need to give a reason. Many Ward 11 voters have already done so, which will help limit crowds at polling places. Ballots will arrive up to several weeks before each election, along with postage-paid envelopes to return them — and an I Voted sticker. Request your ballot at least 10 days before an election so you have enough time to receive and return it. Get more information about voting by mail here. If you have already requested your mail-in ballot, you can check on its status here.

Please note that, if you do choose to vote in person, several Ward 11 polling places have been relocated due to COVID-19. The following changes are in effect for next month’s primary and were made to avoid residential buildings and to support physical distancing:

pollingplaces


Park Board Adopts Guidelines for Encampments

At its meeting last week, the Park Board adopted a resolution limiting the total number of parks available for temporary encampments to 20 citywide. The Park Board also passed provisions that regulate these encampments to support the health and safety of those living there, including by limiting the number of tents allowed in each park to 25. In addition, the Park Board established a new temporary permit that can be issued to an individual or body that agrees to be responsible for day-to-day oversight of an encampment. Within 48 hours of issuing such a permit, the Park Board would provide restrooms or portable toilets, hand-washing stations, and trash/recycling containers.

In addition, the Park Board’s resolution directs staff to formally request assistance from agencies and organizations that have clear and defined responsibility for addressing homelessness. Park Board staff will share updates with the Park Board’s elected commissioners on Sept. 15 that detail progress on moving encampment residents into shelter and housing suitable for winter conditions.

Meanwhile, the City continues to work with Hennepin County to help connect people experiencing homelessness to housing, shelter, and services. Our Health Department is coordinating public health services at large encampments, and the City continues to work with community partners to secure federal COVID-19 funding to expand outreach and rapid rehousing services. City staff is working to bring several new shelters into operation. Find more information on our ongoing efforts here.


Grand Avenue Reconstruction Open House This Week

The City plans to reconstruct more than two miles of Grand Avenue South between Lake Street and 48th Street. The 60-year-old pavement has reached the end of its useful life and needs to be replaced. With the total reconstruction of Grand Avenue, we have the opportunity to replace aging infrastructure, improve safety, incorporate pedestrian infrastructure that is accessible to all, calm traffic speeds, and enhance greening and stormwater facilities.

Based on public feedback to date and in alignment with city policies, Public Works has refined the design, which will be presented to the City Council in August. Learn more at a virtual open house this Wednesday, July 22, from 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Public Works staff will be on hand to give a presentation and take questions. Visit the project website to learn more and see how to participate. If you can’t attend the open house, you can find a recorded presentation on the project website.


Open Streets Canceled Due to COVID-19

After making some initial cancellations and postponements earlier this year, Open Streets Minneapolis organizers have canceled all Open Streets events planned for this summer due to the risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus poses an ongoing threat to our community, and gathering in large groups exacerbates the risk of transmission and infection. Our community will miss this celebration of public space, biking and walking, and local businesses. I look forward to continuing this tradition in future years. Learn more here.


COVID-19 Unemployment Benefits Set to End

The federal government has not so far approved an extension of the additional unemployment benefit folks have been able to receive since this spring due to mass job losses caused by the pandemic. Without federal action to extend it, the additional $600 weekly benefit distributed for the past several months will end after July 25. Those receiving unemployment benefits will continue to get their base amount, but the scheduled elimination of the additional federal benefit is a frustrating change that will put even more strain on families in our community. If you have questions or want to check out additional resources during this challenging time, the state has put together a helpful list here.


Resources for Families During COVID-19

Hennepin County continues to offer assistance to residents in need that can be used to cover this month’s rent or past-due rent from previous months. To qualify you must:

  • Rent anywhere in Hennepin County.
  • Have had household income below 50% of the area median income (about $46,550 for a three-person household) before COVID-19.
  • Lost income due to COVID-19 that has not been replaced by unemployment insurance or other emergency assistance.
  • Can’t afford housing costs this month.
  • Not currently receive Section 8 or other rental assistance.

Priority will be given to households with the lowest incomes and those not eligible for unemployment insurance. Learn more and apply for assistance here. If you do not have internet access or cannot complete the form in English call 612-302-3160.

Additionally, Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) will continue serving free meals to all children 18 and under through Friday, August 21. Families can pick-up food boxes at 50 schools and parks across Minneapolis, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To keep families and staff safe, sites offer contact-free pick-up. All youth are invited to participate in this program and do not need to be enrolled in MPS to receive food boxes. Youth, parents, or siblings can pick up one box for each child in their family, per week. Find more information, including pick-up locations and schedules, here.


“20 is Plenty” Yard Signs Available Through Friday

You only have through this Friday, July 24 to pick up your blue “20 is Plenty” yard signs to help raise awareness of the City’s efforts to implement lower speed limits in support of safer streets. Starting this fall, the new speed limit will be 20 mph in both Minneapolis and St. Paul unless otherwise posted. Slower speeds on local streets make travel safer for everyone no matter how you get around. Learn more about lower speed limits here.

You can get a “20 is Plenty” sign of your own from any Minneapolis fire station — they’ll be placed outside for no-contact pickup. Signs and metal stands will be available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., through Friday, July 24 or while supplies last. Find your nearest fire station here.


Ward 11 Community Conversation – Thursday, July 23

I will host my next virtual Community Conversation on Thursday, July 23 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. In keeping with guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic, I will host this meeting via Skype. All Ward 11 community members are welcome to join online or by phone. In the interest of keeping this conversation as constructive and productive as possible (and to avoid frustrations with background noise) I will be taking questions via email and answering them on the call. If there are specific questions or topics you would like to discuss, please share them with me via email at jeremy.schroeder@minneapolismn.gov. You can send them in advance of Wednesday’s event or during it. We’ll get through as many as we can during our time together.

To participate, click this link during the meeting time on Thursday. Alternatively, you can join by calling 612-276-6670 and entering 697555709# as your conference ID.

Andrea Jenkins: Ward 8 Update

A Message from Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins

Hello Neighbors,

We are experiencing some of the most challenging times this City has ever witnessed. The City Council met earlier today to discuss an amended budget proposal submitted by Mayor Frey, which would make some very difficult cuts to programs that will be very painful. We have several growing encampments throughout the city including a very large one at Powderhorn Park. City leaders and staff are responding to the devastation of small businesses and lives along Lake Street, Broadway Ave and Cedar-Riverside. And as many of you know there is an unprecedented amount of violence that is being perpetrated in our communities and communities around the country as a result of the murder of George Floyd and other unarmed Black people. I want to assure folks that the City is working hard to address these issues and some of the measures being taken are identified below.

Any one of these crisis’ would be all consuming and challenging to find solutions, but all of them together can begin to feel overwhelming. I am attempting to approach these challenges methodically; we are developing a community engagement strategy to collaborate with community on the best way to bring stability and safety to the intersection of 38th and Chicago and the surrounding area. We are working with multiple jurisdictions to address the homeless crisis, and my colleagues and I are working to create a Public Safety Continuum that keeps everyone safe in our community. I know there is a lot of consternation and uncertainty about the future, there is a desire for the council to have a “plan”. But that is where community comes in, there is a charter amendment proposal that has been submitted to a Hennepin County Judge appointed Charter Commission. That proposal among other things would replace the existing charter department (MPD) with a Department of Public Safety and Crime Prevention. But this only happens if the Charter Commission puts this on the ballot and then you, the voters determine that we should pursue this. If voters determined that we should, then we would embark upon a year long process with all residents that want to engage to determine what the Department of Public Safety and Crime Prevention would consist of.

I supported this proposal because in my opinion is represents true democracy, it puts the question to the voters and invites the public to be a part of shaping what comes next. Folks, we are at a very pivotal moment in American history. There has been an unequal balance of power for far too long. Some people have been fine with that as they benefit from the ways our society functions. However, many people have not been ok with the status quo for a very long time, now those voices are finally being heard and it has come time for us as a society to determine how we live together in the future. As the councilmember of the 8th Ward, I ask for your engagement, your patience and most of all your humanity as we work to solve these centuries in the making issues.

Sincerely,

electronic signature

Public hearings set for July 15 and 21 on the proposed charter amendment creating new Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention

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I’ve heard from many of you about the proposed amendment to the City Charter related to the future of public safety in our city. The Charter Commission is seeking public comments on the proposed charter amendment and will host two public hearings in the coming weeks. People can submit their comments online or provide them directly to members of the commission at a public hearing on Wednesday, July 15 or July 21.

The proposed amendment, submitted by the City Council, proposes removing the Police Department from the charter and adding a new Community Safety & Violence Prevention Department. Under State law, the Charter Commission is required to review and submit its recommendation(s) on the proposed amendment before a ballot question can be presented to voters.

The virtual public hearings will take place at 5 p.m. Wednesday, July 15, and at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 21. Participation instructions will be published on the City’s website. If you’re interested in speaking at either or both of the public hearings, you can pre-register using the online registration form.

Other ways to comment:

The City Council voted June 26 to advance the proposal as a ballot measure to be considered by Minneapolis voters.

Under state law, the Charter Commission has at least 60 days to complete its review and submit its recommendation to the City Council. The statutory deadline for submitting questions on the Nov. 3 general election ballot is Friday, Aug. 21. If approved by voters, the changes would become effective May 1, 2021.

For more information about this process, please visit the City’s webpage for the proposed charter amendment as well as the newly developed frequently asked questions section.

You can also watch the Wednesday, July 8 Charter Commission Meeting where the five Council Members that authored of the amendment presented to the commission and stood for questions.


The City’s response to unsheltered homelessness and growing encampments

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Minneapolis has experienced an unprecedented growth in homeless encampments since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. There are several large encampments citywide with the largest currently at Powderhorn Park in south Minneapolis. There are roughly 100 encampments throughout the city, most of which are small in size.

Response

The City is working with Hennepin County to help connect people experiencing homelessness to housing, shelter and services while preserving dignity and respect. The response includes:

  • The City has placed more than 15 hygiene stations throughout the city including portable toilets, handwashing stations, used syringe containers and trash receptables.
  • The City Health Department is coordinating public health services at large encampments.
  • Officers from the Minneapolis Police Department Homeless and Vulnerable Persons Initiative deliver food and water and help people access resources.
  • The City works with contracted outreach providers to connect encampment residents with services, shelter and housing.
  • The City and County will work with community partners to secure federal COVID-19 funding to expand outreach and rapid rehousing services and expand long-term culturally appropriate shelter capacity.

Affordable housing

Housing ends homelessness, and the City and County have significantly increased investments in affordable housing development in 2019 and 2020, with priority for housing serving people experiencing homelessness.

  • Since 2006, the City has provided more than $68 million to help develop more than 900 units of supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness.
  • About 290 new units for people experiencing homelessness will close on financing from City and County, State and/or Minneapolis Public Housing Authority (MPHA) funding programs and start construction in 2020.
  • We are working with partners to prevent evictions during this time of crisis. The City made $3 million available for Emergency Housing Assistance for people who have lost income due to COVID.
  • The County has made $15 million available for Emergency Housing Assistance through CARES Act funds. Applications for County housing assistance are currently being accepted.

Find out more on the City website.


Public hearings scheduled for July 14 and 22 on the revised 2020 City budget

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The City Council’s Budget Committee will hold two public hearings, July 14 and 22, on proposed revisions to the City’s 2020 budget. The City is facing approximately $156 million in projected revenue losses because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Revised budget proposal

Mayor Jacob Frey presented the second phase of his revised budget proposal to the City Council’s Budget Committee on Thursday, July 9th. The proposal avoids mass layoffs of City employees by relying on existing spending freezes, use of cash reserves, program cuts and furloughs. The budget also prioritizes preserving housing, economic development and racial equity work that will benefit the communities of color who have been hit hardest by COVID-19.

Frey’s Phase 1 response to the impact of COVID had included spending and hiring freezes and has saved approximately $58 million to date.

Public hearings

Engage and share your voice in this process during two online public hearings:

  • 6:05 p.m. Tuesday, July 14
  • 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 22

The City Council is scheduled to hold a budget markup July 17 and vote July 24 on a revised 2020 budget.

You can watch the online meetings and participate in the online public hearings.

For more information about the City’s budget, visit minneapolismn.gov/budget.


Public hearing set for Monday, August 3 to establish 38th and Chicago with the commemorative street name “George Perry Floyd Jr. Place”

mock up of george floyd perry sign

Image Description: proposed mock up for the commemorative street sign in honor of Mr. George Perry Floyd Jr.

In collaboration with Ward 9 Council Member Alondra Cano, we have directed staff to bring forward an application to commemoratively rename the intersection of 38th St. and Chicago Ave “George Perry Floyd Jr Place” at the request of the community. This is a small action that we can take now to ensure that the life and tragic death of Mr. George Floyd will never be forgotten.

This application will go before the City’s Planning Commission for an initial public hearing on Monday, Aug. 3rd at 4:30 pm. Upon approval, it will be sent to the Council’s BIZ committee on Tuesday, September 8th and then for a final vote at the Friday, September 18th full City Council meeting. More information will be shared as the application is finalized.


Voters are encouraged to vote by mail this election year; Horn Tower Polling site relocated to Lyndale Community School

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Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is encouraging voting early by mail, and Minneapolis Elections & Voter Services supports this and other CDC and Minneapolis Department of Health recommendations to make sure every voter in Minneapolis can safely cast their ballots this election year.

One Ward 8 poll has been relocated

With concerns surrounding coronavirus, several polling sites have been relocated in Minneapolis; either due to a poll being located in a residential building, or due to distancing limitations at a site. The following polling place relocation for Ward 8 is in effect for the Aug. 11 Primary and Nov. 3 General Election:

Ward-Precinct

New Polling Place

8-1

Lyndale Community School, 312 34th St W

MOVED FROM Horn Towers Highrise, 3121 Pillbury Ave

What’s on the ballot?

Minneapolis voters will cast ballots for the following primary races:

  • U.S. senator.
  • United States representative (District 5).
  • School Board member at large.
  • Council member (Ward 6 only).

State law allows voters to bring materials into the polls to help complete their ballots, and the sample ballot is the best tool available for this purpose. By downloading and printing their sample ballots (which are customized to their specific ward and precinct), voters can practice marking their ballots. They can bring this marked-up sample ballot as a reference to the voting booth when completing their official ballots. This is the best way to reduce the time spent waiting in lines.

Find sample ballots for all 134 Minneapolis precincts here: vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/ballot.

To minimize direct contact with others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends voting by mail if possible. All Minnesota residents are eligible to vote early by mail. Should you wish to avoid going to your polling location on Election Day, you can apply now to receive a mail ballot for both August and November. It’s an easy process online or by paper application.

For the online application:  vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail

For a paper application, please call 311 to request a copy.

We recommend you apply for a mail ballot no later than 10 days before Election Day. For the State Primary only, your ballot will count as long as it is postmarked on or before Election Day (August 11) and is received in the mail no later than two days after Election Day (by August 13). This is a change from previous election law requiring mail ballots to be received by Election Day. Please note that if you deliver your ballot in-person to the Elections office, it still must be returned by 3 p.m. on Election Day.

Currently, for the November 3 General Election, your mail ballot will not count if we receive it after Election Day, even if it was postmarked on or before Election Day.

Changes to voting by mail

Any Minnesota voter can vote early; no reason is needed. However, due to a recent court action, some of the requirements for voting by mail have changed. These affect witness requirements and the deadline for returning your ballot. Currently, these changes only apply to the State primary.

  • If you are registered to vote at your current address you will not need a mail ballot witness for the Aug. 11 State primary.
  • If you have moved, changed names or need to register for the first time, you will need a witness to sign your mail ballot envelope.

For the State primary, a voter’s ballot will count as long as it is postmarked on or before the day of the primary (Aug. 11) and is received in the mail no later than two days after the primary (Aug. 13). This is a change from previous election law requiring mail ballots to be received by the day of the primary. Please note that if voters deliver their ballot in-person to the Elections & Voter Services office, it still must be returned by 3 p.m. on the day of the primary.

More information on how to vote by mail is available at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail.

Voting at the Early Vote Center

The Early Vote Center, 980 East Hennepin Ave., makes early in-person voting more convenient for Minneapolis voters. It’s especially helpful to people who need language support or other special accommodations, such as curbside voting. And while we are in a pandemic, voting early can help people avoid lines and crowds at polling places on the day of the election.

The Early Vote Center’s hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday (closed Friday, July 3). The center will also have Saturday hours for the last two weekends before the primary. All early voting hours are posted on the Elections & Voter Services website: vote.minneapolismn.gov/events.

Election judges needed

Election judges are needed for the State primary Aug. 11 to serve voters in local polling places. Election judges are paid $17.15 per hour for their service, which includes training. Depending upon schedule and preferences, people can choose which elections they work in, and whether they want to be at a polling place close to where they live or anywhere else in Minneapolis.

Serving as an election judge provides an opportunity to learn about the election process and is an important service to our community. Judges who are fluent in a second language are especially needed to provide additional language support in the polling place, including Spanish, Somali, Hmong, Oromo, Lao, Vietnamese, Russian and American Sign Language.

Find out more about this opportunity at vote.minneapolismn.gov/judges or call 311.

Voters can save time by taking these three steps

  1. Make sure you’re registered to vote, or pre-register at least 21 days before the election. Voters can register or check the status of their registrations at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/register.
  2. Download and complete the absentee ballot application form in advance, and bring it when you go to vote. Find the request form at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/bymail.
  3. Look at a sample ballot ahead of time; even bring it to refer to when you go to vote. Find your sample ballot at vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/ballot.

The City’s 911/MPD Workgroup is seeking input on Non-Emergency Crime and Mental Health Crisis Calls to 911

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In November of 2019, The City Council directed the City Coordinator’s Office to convene a work group comprised of internal City staff and community members to analyze dispatch 911 call categories and determine whether there are opportunities to expand the City’s ability to respond to those calls beyond the Minneapolis Police Department. (Full staff direction can be found on page 4 of this presentation.)

Recommendations from the work group focus on two call areas: 1) Mental Health Crisis calls to 911 and 2) non-emergency report-only calls to 911. Surveys have been created to learn from the experiences of those most impacted and the City is looking for your feedback.

The primary purpose of the surveys is to gain insight from individuals who have experience calling 911 for either a mental health crisis or non-emergency crime calls. A team of residents and staff are redesigning the way calls are handled by the city and they want to hear your perspectives and uplift your voices to make real change in our communities.  Both surveys are open to all and responses are anonymous.

Help redesign the system for reporting non-emergency crimes to the City of Minneapolis

We are looking to hear from residents who have experienced and reported a non-emergency crime.  Such situations include theft, property damage, or parking issues.  Who did you talk to?  Were your needs met?  What was the experience like?

Click here to start the survey now

If you have questions, please email the Office of Performance & Innovation at innovate@minneapolismn.gov

mental health crisis survey

Have you experienced a mental health crisis?

We are looking to hear from residents who have experienced or witnessed a mental health crisis.  Who did you call?  Who showed up?  How were you treated?  Did you feel safe?  Were your needs met?

Click here to start the survey now


City launches a new webpage for the Office of Violence Prevention

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The City of Minneapolis Office of Violence Prevention has a new web presence describing its work within the City’s “transforming public safety” content. The office uses a community-focused public health approach to address the roots of violence, intervene at the first sign of risk, and lead healing in its aftermath.

The Office of Violence Prevention approaches violence prevention with this these things in mind:

  • Violence is not inevitable. As with other health conditions, we can prevent and treat violence, and we can heal from it.
  • Violence has roots in social, economic, political and cultural conditions. These can include:
    • Oppression.
    • Limited economic opportunities.
    • Community disinvestment.
    • Community disconnectedness.
    • Poor housing conditions.
    • Harmful norms around gender and masculinity.
    • Classism.
    • Racism.
  • Violence takes an unequal toll on communities of color and on specific neighborhoods in Minneapolis. Violence prevention must include work to dismantle structural racism.
  • Everyone has a role to play in creating communities that don’t include violence. It takes all of us to make our communities safe, healthy, hopeful and thriving.

Participate and learn more

The Office of Violence Prevention formed in 2018 building on Health Department violence prevention work since 2006. The work has been a national model for other cities across the country.


City reimagining public access television with new vendor BFRESH Productions

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The City is transforming its public access television services. As media consumption has evolved, it has become clear that the City should transition from a public access programming approach to explore new initiatives that support local storytelling and content creation and encourage community engagement.

The City has contracted with BFRESH Productions to reimagine public access television as community media. BFRESH will manage the City’s three public access channels and provide community media services to Minneapolis residents. Community media content will continue to air on Comcast channels 16, 17 and 75 and CenturyLink channels 8007, 8008 and 8009. Community media services and cablecasting will begin in July 2020.

Transitioning from public access to a community media approach will open new doors for public collaboration. This new vision seeks to:

  • Take a multimedia approach to developing, creating and distributing stories and content.
  • Provide the training skills necessary for residents to compete in the current and future workforce.
  • Create additional opportunities to build connections between communities.
  • Provide resources for hyperlocal media organizations to tell their stories.

BFRESH will build on the City’s commitment of promoting a local focus; diversity of voice; and independent, non-commercial media content created for and by the people of Minneapolis. BFRESH will provide community media services such as training, access to production equipment, space and provide and manage free airtime on the City’s public access channels. Programming for the channels will consist of community-produced TV shows, shorts, films and other hyperlocal storytelling content.

About BFRESH Productions 

BFRESH Productions is a media production and communications agency based in north Minneapolis. The collective experience of its diverse, multi-generational team spans broadcast, media training, journalism, program management, data insight, technology and public access television.

Share your feedback

BFRESH invites the community to provide feedback by taking a survey as BFRESH gathers data and opportunities to best serve Minneapolis residents. Ideas for content and partnerships in the evolving community media access model are encouraged. BFRESH will also host several virtual conversations in July and August for residents to help shape the future of community media in Minneapolis.

To contact BFRESH Productions, email info@bfreshproductions.com.


Pay-what-you-can trainings provided by the MN Peacebuilding Leadership Institute

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Introduction to Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience for Cultural Competence – 2 hour online training

When terrible things happen, like COVID-19, racism, police brutality, our peace is stolen from us. Most people want to build peace back into their lives and community. These 2-hour online trainings are partially funded by the City of Minneapolis’ Office of Violence Prevention to promote racial trauma healing, resilience, and restorative justice for all who live, work, and/or play in Minneapolis. Pay-what-you-can up to $30

Click the date/time link to register:

This 2-hour online training teaches basic concepts, models, and strategies of the 5-day Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience – STAR Training. STAR is a research and practice-supported community education training integrating neuropsychology, trauma healing and resilience, restorative justice, nonviolent conflict transformation, and broadly defined spirituality for increasing cultural competence. All are welcome to join us. Space is limited to 30.

Minnesota social workers, teachers, and nurses can earn 2 hours of continuing education for $45. These trainings are in high demand. Register early. Sponsored by Minnesota Peacebuilding Leadership Institute.

Online STAR-Lite Training: Learning Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience in a Single Day for Cultural Competence – 8-hour online training

This training is being partially grant-funded by the Engelsma Family Foundation for those who live, work, and/or play in Minneapolis. Pay-what-you-can-up-to $40.

Click here for details and to register:

Wednesday, July 22, 2020, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. CST

STAR-Lite is a single-day, evidence-based online training integrating neuropsychology, trauma healing and resilience, restorative justice, nonviolent conflict transformation, and broadly defined spirituality. STAR-Lite is for professionals, paraprofessionals, and laypeople. All are welcome to join us. This training is partially funded by the Engelsma Family Foundation. Space is limited to 60. Optional 6.5 CEs and 5.5 CLEs available for an additional $35. Please register as soon as possible and at least by 9am the day before the training.

Free Monthly Racial Healing Circle: Coming to the Table

Join Peacebuilding Assistant Executive Director and CTTT facilitator Crixell Shell and others invested in transforming racialized trauma into nonviolent power with positive productive alternatives to revenge to make Minneapolis a peacebuilding power city for all. 20 people maximum per circle.

Register for these free monthly online talking circles at: https://www.mnpeace.org/events.html

Introduction to Restorative Justice for Community Healing and Transformation   2-hour online training

Relationships are ruptured by harm and violence. Restorative justice heals and repairs individual and community relationships to prevent violence.
Pay-What-You-Can-Up to $50. This training is for everyone who wants to learn the basics of Restorative Justice.
Details and registration:  
Friday, July 24, 2020, 10am – 12noon

Training objectives:
1. Learn the basic Restorative Justice philosophy, principles, and practices.
2. Learn the differences between Restorative Justice and other types of justice.
3. Discuss how to apply Restorative Justice concepts through a trauma-informed lens for community healing and transformation.


“20 is Plenty” speed limit yard signs available at Minneapolis fire stations

Minneapolis and Saint Paul are in the process of implementing new, lower speed limits to support safer streets. Slower speeds on local streets make travel safer for everyone no matter how you get around.

The new speed limit starting this fall will be 20 mph in both cities unless otherwise signed. To help get out the word about the new speed limits and the importance of slower speeds for safety, the City has yard signs available for community members.

You can pick up your “20 is Plenty” yard sign at any Minneapolis fire station. Signs will be available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Fridays through July 24 while supplies last. Due to COVID-19, signs will be available outside the stations for no-contact pickup. Signs come with metal stands. Find your nearest fire station here.

You can learn more about new speed limits here.

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Everyone can work to reduce the spread of COVID-19

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We’re working hard to slow the spread of the coronavirus to save lives. Social exposures and contacts are increasing as more places open back up, and young adults now account for more than 50% of cases.

  • Wear masks when in public. 10-50% of virus carriers are asymptomatic, so they don’t even know they’re sick. Wearing masks helps control the virus and has been shown to lower COVID-19 spread.
  • Avoid enclosed spaces with groups of people, where the virus can linger in the air for long periods of time.
  • Get tested if you have cold or flu-like symptomsFind testing locations.
  • Stay 6 feet away from others.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or sleeve, or a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands afterwards.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom or before eating. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face – especially your eyes, nose and mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Do not go to “COVID parties” – Young adults face a real risk of significant illness and complications. They can also pass the virus along to family members and other people in the community.

Donate homemade face masks at Minneapolis fire stations for Mask Drive Mondays

Minneapolis residents can deliver homemade masks to their local fire station from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Monday for Mask Drive Mondays. The City’s Health Department continues to get requests from the community for help securing masks and the donations make a big difference in meeting those needs.


Visit us at minneapolismn.gov/ward8

Central • Bryant • Bancroft • Field • Regina • Northrop • Lyndale • Kingfield

Andrea Jenkins, 350 S. Fifth St., City Hall Room 307, Minneapolis, MN 55415

For reasonable accommodations or alternative formats please call 311 at 612-673-3000.

People who are deaf or hard of hearing can use a relay service to call 311 at 612-673-3000. TTY users can call 612-673-2157 or 612-673-2626.

Para asistencia 612-673-2700, Yog xav tau kev pab, hu 612-673-2800, Hadii aad Caawimaad u baahantahay 612-673-3500.

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